PDA

View Full Version : price a yard


guido316
10-30-2009, 11:36 PM
i'm starting my own company how much should i charge a yard in ohio and how much on mulch as well if there are other prices you can think of that would help that would be awesome like edging ect.

CrewKut
10-31-2009, 04:35 AM
This is a joke, right?

Team_Green
10-31-2009, 08:20 AM
It's going to depend on the size of the lawn, and the amount of mulch you are using.

tamadrummer
10-31-2009, 08:23 AM
Shoot for $1,000,000/yr on each yard. If you can do that you will do well in this business.

clean_cut
10-31-2009, 10:15 AM
There is almost no way to accuratley price a yard with the provide information, one yard might take 30 miniutes to cut, while another takes 3 hours, and hopefully you wouldn't price them the same, maybe some more details would help.

guido316
10-31-2009, 02:30 PM
ok i guess what i was trying to ask is how much do i charge per hour i cut do you charge extra for edging and if i buy a cy. of mulch for 22 how much would i charge to install. i was hoping for a broad answer to give me a general ideal.

jhawk60
10-31-2009, 04:21 PM
Here is a broad answer on pricing that I posted in answer to another thread on pricing:

"Every company, every job, and every area is different. You can't base your prices solely off what someone else would charge for a job. Someone in your area may be able to help with the going hourly rate for labor, but the rest of the items that need to be addressed when figuring out a price are something only you can calculate.

Only you can determine how much of what material you will need and how much, if any, you need to mark them up. You must know what equipment you will be using on a job and how much it costs to run, maintain, and replace it. Only you know how much you need to cover gas, vehicle, estimating time, insurance etc. Only you can determine what percentage of profit you want your business to generate. And only you can know how long it will take you to complete a job.

How did you set your goal of $50.00 per hour? Did you take into account all of the costs associated with running the business, the profit margin you hope to achieve, and the wage you feel you should receive for operating a business, or does $50.00 per hour/per man just sound like a good number? What if you get the $50.00 per hour, but you find out it is costing $51.00 per hour to run the business? I'm not saying it would, I'm saying if you don't know the costs then it's just a shot in the dark.

I am not trying to discourage you in any way shape or form. I am simply stating that if running this business is what you want to do, you have to know every cost associated with its operation in order to make it a profitable enterprise.

Determine your costs and put them in this formula:

((labor + material + tool charge + overhead) x (1 + profit margin)) x hours to complete job = price

That is how you come up with prices.

If someone tells you they are charging $75.00-$125.00 for fall cleanups how does this help you? You don't know the size of the properties, the number of trees on them, the equipment being used, or whether the person is running a successful company, barely staying afloat, or working for beer money.

I know it can be frustrating and at times it would be nice for someone to tell you "if you are doing this, you charge this much", but it doesn't work that way, and if it did, then you wouldn't really be running a business, now would you?"

guido316
10-31-2009, 07:48 PM
thanks man that does help i just wish i knew the the competitive prices were for my area but the formula will help for sure thanks man

SangerLawn
10-31-2009, 09:07 PM
thanks man that does help i just wish i knew the the competitive prices were for my area but the formula will help for sure thanks man

I hope you make invoices more professional then you type on here. Periods are real simple to use. It is 2 keys to the right of the m key on your keyboard. You might want to consider using some kind of spell check also.

SangerLawn
10-31-2009, 09:08 PM
Shoot for $1,000,000/yr on each yard. If you can do that you will do well in this business.

Excellent advice!!!!

Big C
11-01-2009, 03:03 AM
Do them for free....you'll get more customers that way:dizzy:;)......just that stupid question alone says one thing-------I am getting into a biz without doing a lick of research.....not a good start my friend.

Hanau
11-01-2009, 03:13 AM
Shoot for $1,000,000/yr on each yard. If you can do that you will do well in this business.

Low baller. :laugh:

Hoy landscaping
11-01-2009, 10:14 AM
ok i guess what i was trying to ask is how much do i charge per hour i cut do you charge extra for edging and if i buy a cy. of mulch for 22 how much would i charge to install. i was hoping for a broad answer to give me a general ideal.

for mulch i charge what the price of the mulch is. 22 per yard, 22 for me to spread it. but my minimum is 20. also over 10 yards i add 5 per yard

tamadrummer
11-01-2009, 01:41 PM
Low baller. :laugh:

Yes I know but you have to start somewhere. When I get big like you guys I can try for the big bucks......:dizzy:


(Don't you just love these threads)

mdlwn1
11-01-2009, 01:49 PM
I was gonna start an airline. Me and my buddy..(he's a cop) were wondering how much to charge........

guido316
11-01-2009, 08:10 PM
hey thanks for the advice spell check would be a good tool thanks man and periods that would really help you think well guess what this isnt a buisness invoice and i dont care to go back to look over it time is money in the field your in i would think you would know that all i was tring to do was ask a simple question to what i though would be a cool group of guys not a bunch of smart a$$es but thanks for the advise

Ole' Hickory
11-01-2009, 09:00 PM
Well, I guess he showed You!

cooltype
11-01-2009, 09:02 PM
i think you should just stop now please.

CrewKut
11-01-2009, 09:37 PM
Kind of off to a rough start.

Spelling, grammatical, and punctuation issues aside, I think mdlwn1 nailed it. Go back and re-read your original question. What did you expect the response to be? If you would have done any lurking or reading on this site, you would have at least known to provide more info in the question. You will find a wealth of information here.

I would suggest you get to know the feel of the site and do a little searching before jumping in with both feet. Also, perhaps check the attitude and thin skin at the door. Just my observation. Take it with a grain of salt.

Other than that... Welcome to Lawnsite and good luck.

Dan

Landscape Poet
11-01-2009, 11:10 PM
Shoot for $1,000,000/yr on each yard. If you can do that you will do well in this business. Just come in $1 below this and you will get all of his yards - LOL

Landscape Poet
11-01-2009, 11:19 PM
thanks man that does help i just wish i knew the the competitive prices were for my area but the formula will help for sure thanks man
This is my real advice to you. If you can use the yellow pages, call up several of the local contractors and have them bid your property. Then you will see what kind of rate your yard goes for. This gives you a starting point. Ask amount different options such as monthly contract price, weekly cut price, ask what services they include in there cut, does that include trimming the hedges, edging beds etc? If not ask how much more that stuff is.
But then figure out if YOU can make money doing it at that price, well at least make more money than you can make somewhere else.

Just my thoughts on how you could get started gathering information BEFORE you decide to jump into the business.

LouisianaLawnboy
11-02-2009, 12:35 AM
Shoot for $1,000,000/yr on each yard. If you can do that you will do well in this business.

Confusing advice, but the question is more confusing.

I can't charge 1,000.00 a yr for a 7 acre yard.

This is the dumbest question.

MowMasters
11-02-2009, 01:58 PM
Kinda funny the crap that some of these folks mention on here and the bad mouthing that goes on. Not very professional. One thing to keep in mind is to keep your eyes peeled in the legal notices in your local newspaper for open bids that will be coming out for properties for the year of 2010. Also try calling your local landscape companies and have them come give you a estimate on your own lawn and that will help you compare there price with the size of your lawn and then use that for a guide when handing out estimates by comparing your personal lawn with the customers. It could be a start i guess until you get familiar with the buisness

CrewKut
11-02-2009, 05:20 PM
Kinda funny the crap that some of these folks mention on here and the bad mouthing that goes on. Not very professional. One thing to keep in mind is to keep your eyes peeled in the legal notices in your local newspaper for open bids that will be coming out for properties for the year of 2010. Also try calling your local landscape companies and have them come give you a estimate on your own lawn and that will help you compare there price with the size of your lawn and then use that for a guide when handing out estimates by comparing your personal lawn with the customers. It could be a start i guess until you get familiar with the buisness

Really? So wasting the time of legitimate LCOs would be the professional way to handle this inquiry? I mean to have them come out and estimate the cost of doing your lawn services, knowing full well that you have absolutely no intention of hiring them for these services. You are merely fishing for the price that they would have charged you if you were to hire them. Exactly how does that help the OP calculate his next estimate? How does he know if he is covering his costs and making a profit? I guess my definition of professional differs from yours.

I have had this happen to me and I'll tell you what, I wasn't too happy about wasting my time. I'd have been less PO'd if they would have just been honest up front and told me their situation. I might have been more likely to help and not wasted a trip.

jhawk60 gave him a good answer.

You know, this is a great place to find helpful information, you just gotta look for it. A little research goes a long way. Do your homework and figure out what you need to make a living and be successful. Nobody here can tell him what to charge without a lot more info. Even then it would be a ballpark guess. Only the OP and possibly his CPA could actually pin it down after crunching the numbers.

Based on the original question, what would you expect the answers to be?

Dan

Landscape Poet
11-02-2009, 06:20 PM
Really? So wasting the time of legitimate LCOs would be the professional way to handle this inquiry? I mean to have them come out and estimate the cost of doing your lawn services, knowing full well that you have absolutely no intention of hiring them for these services. You are merely fishing for the price that they would have charged you if you were to hire them. Exactly how does that help the OP calculate his next estimate? How does he know if he is covering his costs and making a profit? I guess my definition of professional differs from yours.

I have had this happen to me and I'll tell you what, I wasn't too happy about wasting my time. I'd have been less PO'd if they would have just been honest up front and told me their situation. I might have been more likely to help and not wasted a trip.

jhawk60 gave him a good answer.

You know, this is a great place to find helpful information, you just gotta look for it. A little research goes a long way. Do your homework and figure out what you need to make a living and be successful. Nobody here can tell him what to charge without a lot more info. Even then it would be a ballpark guess. Only the OP and possibly his CPA could actually pin it down after crunching the numbers.

Based on the original question, what would you expect the answers to be?

Dan

REREAD MY POST - yes, call another landscaper and get a price! I guess you are SOOOOOO Great at this line of work that you never have to guess what others are doing do you? Get real - you mow yards for a living too - it is not like you are doing open heart surgery - you must know what the competitive price is in your area - if you do not, you suck at business.
If you do not know what your market is doing then you have your head up your a$$. So yes I think calling others and getting bids on your own property is a good way to gain insight into what his market pays.
Again - read the post again - I went on after suggesting this to say something about after seeing what they give as a price - if he thinks he can make a living doing that before getting into the business.

Landscape Poet
11-02-2009, 06:33 PM
Really? So wasting the time of legitimate LCOs would be the professional way to handle this inquiry? I mean to have them come out and estimate the cost of doing your lawn services, knowing full well that you have absolutely no intention of hiring them for these services. You are merely fishing for the price that they would have charged you if you were to hire them. Exactly how does that help the OP calculate his next estimate? How does he know if he is covering his costs and making a profit? I guess my definition of professional differs from yours.

I have had this happen to me and I'll tell you what, I wasn't too happy about wasting my time. I'd have been less PO'd if they would have just been honest up front and told me their situation. I might have been more likely to help and not wasted a trip.

jhawk60 gave him a good answer.

You know, this is a great place to find helpful information, you just gotta look for it. A little research goes a long way. Do your homework and figure out what you need to make a living and be successful. Nobody here can tell him what to charge without a lot more info. Even then it would be a ballpark guess. Only the OP and possibly his CPA could actually pin it down after crunching the numbers.

Based on the original question, what would you expect the answers to be?

Dan

You are partly right on this - but trying to bash me will not go unnoticed.
Yes he must figure out his cost to figure out what he must charge. But he can know that he must charge $55 a hour to make his profit goals, but if the going rate in his area averages out to $45 per hour then it does not matter what he MUST make on paper.
Wal-mart does this all the time ( I know I ran there stores for 8 years) - you must figure out what the price of the market is before you can figure out what your potential profit is. Otherwise you are just paying your accountant to play with numbers and that does not make much since either does it?:hammerhead:

CrewKut
11-02-2009, 09:00 PM
You are partly right on this - but trying to bash me will not go unnoticed.



Michael - Calm down. Where in my post did I single you out and bash you? Please show me, I must have missed it.

Yes he must figure out his cost to figure out what he must charge. But he can know that he must charge $55 a hour to make his profit goals, but if the going rate in his area averages out to $45 per hour then it does not matter what he MUST make on paper.

The reason I said "do your own homework".

REREAD MY POST - yes, call another landscaper and get a price! I guess you are SOOOOOO Great at this line of work that you never have to guess what others are doing do you? Get real - you mow yards for a living too - it is not like you are doing open heart surgery - you must know what the competitive price is in your area - if you do not, you suck at business.

I never claimed to be great at anything, so lighten up.

Again - read the post again - I went on after suggesting this to say something about after seeing what they give as a price - if he thinks he can make a living doing that before getting into the business.

So we agree. He has to figure it out using his numbers.

I've been in business long enough to know that your numbers are probably different than mine. And that what works for you may or may not work for me. I also know that service rates vary in different regions, as does material and labor costs.

I have written a lot of estimates in my life and I can't recall one that was based on what my competition charges. Also, I don't need have my competition come over and give me an estimate to find out what the going rate is.

I guess I just do things differently.

Dan

STIHL GUY
11-02-2009, 09:11 PM
estimate it based on how long you will take to mow it and enought to cover your overhead costs

mdlwn1
11-02-2009, 09:15 PM
The cost ARE over his head....

Landscape Poet
11-03-2009, 10:03 AM
So we agree. He has to figure it out using his numbers.



Dan

LOL - yes we agree - LOL - just different ways of expressing it on paper I guess. But yes he must know what his numbers are - and he must know what the going rate is in his area to see if he can make a living doing it. Sorry I went off a little - it was the end of a long day and I thought you were coming after me. LOL:laugh: