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View Full Version : stupid foundation guys make my job hard!!


E.L.Co
11-13-2009, 09:27 AM
hey guys im in need of advice or confirmation on my plan.
there is an investment property that recieved a large addition. when the foundation guys graded to intall the foundation they pusheds all the dirt to the back of the yard:hammerhead: so now all the water flows right to the foundation because the grade is the opposite of what it should be. so i am called upon to put the grade within code and install a drainage solution. my plan is to regrade with a dingo seeing as the only acess to the yard is under a carport with support posts every 5 feet! so i will use the dingo to take the dirt that was laid at the back of the yard and in essence reverse its location to around the foundation so the water flows away from the foundation. once the grade is in order i will use a mini excavator to trench for a french drain on both sides of the house but i think even that will be a pain in the ass to manuver. my goal is to get the slope to divert water away from the house and the french drain is for extra insurance. stupid people! the grade should have been adressed before building a 200k addition carport and driveway!!!!

JB1
11-13-2009, 09:54 AM
yep, well thats typical construction.

procut
11-13-2009, 09:02 PM
Do you have a pic? Seems like a decent plan, but it sounds like a lot of soil to move with a dingo. The local rental place here has a small bobcat that will fit through a 36" gate, something like that would probably be faster and easier than a dingo.

My only question would be if you get the grade correct so all the water runs away from the building, do you really even need a French drain? Seems like with the proper slope you shouldn't need it. If you had a couple pics I'd give you my opinion some more, good luck!

E.L.Co
11-17-2009, 10:48 AM
Do you have a pic? Seems like a decent plan, but it sounds like a lot of soil to move with a dingo. The local rental place here has a small bobcat that will fit through a 36" gate, something like that would probably be faster and easier than a dingo.

My only question would be if you get the grade correct so all the water runs away from the building, do you really even need a French drain? Seems like with the proper slope you shouldn't need it. If you had a couple pics I'd give you my opinion some more, good luck!

yea ill get some pics today...i opted to spend a day with the dingo to see if proper grading could solve it alone. but yeah youd have to see it to believe it, and advise me so ill put somes pics up this evening

LB1234
11-17-2009, 06:28 PM
rent the trencher for the dingo if you have to install a french drain or drain tiles. it will be perfect if you are just running solid 4" pipe tied to the drain tiles, otherwise with some manuevering you can get a more than adequate french drain installed.

stuvecorp
11-17-2009, 07:25 PM
yep, well thats typical construction.

I am positive they sit down and plan how to make things harder.

Caterkillar
11-18-2009, 11:19 PM
It is hard to help with out a pic. Where is the natural slope of the land going? back toward the house? Are they wanting to waterproof the foundation w/ french drains? Grading will be easy, but waterproofing a house might be a different story.

LindblomRJ
11-22-2009, 08:57 PM
Will re-grading take care of all the drainage and eliminate the need for a french drain? It sounds like they were short sighted on backfilling the foundation and how they wasted out rest of the dirt.

Pictures would be very helpful.

E.L.Co
11-22-2009, 10:21 PM
ill get pics soon. i have decided to do a french drain and grade to divert the water to the french drain, it then flows to a sump pump set up and shoots the water through 2 in pipe under the house and to the front.

LindblomRJ
11-23-2009, 11:32 PM
ill get pics soon. i have decided to do a french drain and grade to divert the water to the french drain, it then flows to a sump pump set up and shoots the water through 2 in pipe under the house and to the front.

Sounds like a good plan. However my concern would be what would happen if there is a heavy rain storm and power outage? What happens when the sump pit fills, and the pump does not run or is unable to keep up with the run off? If the system fails for whatever reason will it cause any damage to the house or other property?

With slope and drainage without assistance up pumps it is more reliable. And it is possible for french drains to fail over time.

E.L.Co
11-24-2009, 08:13 AM
Sounds like a good plan. However my concern would be what would happen if there is a heavy rain storm and power outage? What happens when the sump pit fills, and the pump does not run or is unable to keep up with the run off? If the system fails for whatever reason will it cause any damage to the house or other property?

With slope and drainage without assistance up pumps it is more reliable. And it is possible for french drains to fail over time.

as it sits now it is a hazard to the foundation and due to the odd location of the trouble area i dont see another way...i forgot pics again:hammerhead:

LindblomRJ
11-24-2009, 01:48 PM
as it sits now it is a hazard to the foundation and due to the odd location of the trouble area i dont see another way...i forgot pics again:hammerhead:

So they built the addition on the lowest part of the property?

AGLA
11-24-2009, 06:06 PM
A good thing to add as part of your standard landscape contract is a line that says that the rough grading has to be within 6" of final grade prior to commencing with your work. I don't know if you got stuck with having to fix their grade in order for you to do your thing, or if you got hired to fix it as an extra or as a specific contract. It is a good time to think about adding it to your contract none the less.

E.L.Co
11-30-2009, 07:35 AM
So they built the addition on the lowest part of the property?

yes indeed, they made it the lowest by pushing all the dirt to make way for the addition instead of hauling it out and on the side of thisaddition the drive they poured sits sits as high if not higher then the foundation with an uber low 2 ft gap in between that the water flows right too and flodds the foundation. im writng a sticky note and slapping it on my forehead so i dont forget pics again:hammerhead:

E.L.Co
11-30-2009, 07:39 AM
A good thing to add as part of your standard landscape contract is a line that says that the rough grading has to be within 6" of final grade prior to commencing with your work. I don't know if you got stuck with having to fix their grade in order for you to do your thing, or if you got hired to fix it as an extra or as a specific contract. It is a good time to think about adding it to your contract none the less.

it cost me about 400 bucks to regrade but i had anticipated this from the start and allowed for it in the bid. the project manager for a real estate investment firm out of dallas is somewhat of an extended surrogate family friend if that makes sense so there is no hassle in getting more money if i have to do extra to fix the intial screw up.

AGLA
11-30-2009, 12:59 PM
The note in the contract has a lot less to do with getting paid for the regrading and a lot more to do with not taking ownership of a bad grading and drainage scheme. It might not apply to your situation, but it is a good time to remind people that this is an important issue to cover in your standard contract.