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dtelawn
11-22-2009, 05:39 PM
Two part question. How deep should I expect to make River Pebbles(2-4 inch) in beds. Should I use fabric under them. No additional flowers or bushes will be put in after this initial planting. I guess I am asking more of an opinion from others.

AGLA
11-22-2009, 09:04 PM
The bigger the stone, the deeper the minimum depth. If you have big stones (don't go there) there will be big gaps between them when you lay them 1 stone deep . That means that you'll need at least a second layer of stones to cover the gaps. If you have 3/8" inch stone you can fully cover in less than an inch. That won't happen with 2-4" stone. You'll probably need at least 4".

I remember this from working for a guy who priced covering a McDonald's landscape with river rock. He estimated the materials at 1". It took three inches so that the black weed cloth did not show up and look rediculous. ... not a lot of profit on that job. ... not to mention that it was a real pain in the neck to spread big stone on cloth. The loader wheels turning and the weed cloth were not a good combo. ... neither were shovels, wheel barrows, and rakes. That job totally sucked.

93Chevy
11-22-2009, 09:13 PM
Yeah, I always use weed block with river gravel. I never do with mulch, but always gravel. I'd say 4" is about good for #3 gravel. You don't want to have it too thin.

LindblomRJ
11-22-2009, 09:51 PM
3/8" pea rock 2" will cover.
2" river will need 3 or 4 to cover well. And yes use a good barrier if you are laying down rock. For mulch nope...

White Gardens
11-22-2009, 11:35 PM
Only thing I might add is using a bigger rock rather than a pea-gravel type of mulch.

The reason being is that the smaller rock generally doesn't stay in place, ever. Especially when you use a leaf blower on it.

AGLA
11-23-2009, 08:02 AM
He is using 2"-4" stone. The other sizes were references for describing why he needs to calculate for a deeper application and what happens if he does not.

White Gardens
11-23-2009, 08:04 AM
He is using 2"-4" stone. The other sizes were references for describing why he needs to calculate for a deeper application and what happens if he does not.

He just made a reference to river "Pebbles" and I think that's what stuck out in my mind.

dtelawn
11-23-2009, 10:05 AM
Thanks for the info. The customer requested the larger 2-4 inch stones. I am excited about the size of the job, but I know how much of a pain it will be to get all the rock put in and spread. There is is a few places where equipment will not fit into. Well thanks again for the input.

LindblomRJ
11-24-2009, 12:25 AM
Only thing I might add is using a bigger rock rather than a pea-gravel type of mulch.

The reason being is that the smaller rock generally doesn't stay in place, ever. Especially when you use a leaf blower on it.

I hate to split hairs and point out things, rocks really do not constitute mulch. Mulch generally will amend soil quality. Just saying. :)

White Gardens
11-24-2009, 07:51 AM
I hate to split hairs and point out things, rocks really do not constitute mulch. Mulch generally will amend soil quality. Just saying. :)

Yes and no. Some people consider rock as a mulch generically. I've heard it referred to as mulch by other professionals in discussion before.

I agree, rock isn't mulch. The only similar characteristic to wood mulch is that it will help stabilize the moisture in the soil and that's about it. I only refer to it as mulch in discussion generically.

All semantics I guess, or, splitting hairs. :laugh:

dtelawn
11-24-2009, 11:27 PM
I have another question. What kind of coverage per ton should I be able to expect using the 2-4 inch rock.

White Gardens
11-24-2009, 11:53 PM
I have another question. What kind of coverage per ton should I be able to expect using the 2-4 inch rock.

130 sq ft. per 1 ton. Give or take

Stillwater
11-25-2009, 10:27 AM
I hate to split hairs and point out things, rocks really do not constitute mulch. Mulch generally will amend soil quality. Just saying. :)

sure rocks can be considered mulch, absolutely, it would be an inorganic mulch as apposed to organic mulch like Pine bark,pine straw Their is also rubber mulch used in commercial play grounds,schools and some res. that would be considered inorganic mulch as well. allot of time when you xeriscape you would use an inorganic mulch like river rock.

Travel'n Trees
12-10-2009, 05:02 PM
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Travel'n Trees
12-10-2009, 05:08 PM
All rock weighs different around here we get 50 to 65 sq ft at 4 in depth. As far as rock vs mulch in 2-3 years mulch pays for itself. No bugs or termite issuses either black 4 mil plastic will last 25-30 years easy with no weed problems. What kind of equipment is needed a dump truck and a few wheelbarrels. Loaders waste alot of product and cut deep into profit. Besides damage and very un cost effective. I would almost never use a skid loader to or dingo for rock install.
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