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View Full Version : If the price is right?


DaddyRabbit
05-16-2002, 10:22 PM
I am bidding on a job involving cleaning out a creek which flows through a ladys front yard, this creek has much debris in it but she has a place to dump the debris at via the backhoe. She wants to line it w/Rip Rap stone. This creek is 140' in length and shall be sloped to be 9' wide and a pipe installed which is to be supplied by the owner for vehicle crossings. The stone after hauling is $1900.00, my price. The supplies including the back hoe, stone, fabric, sod staples, grass seed, lime, fertilizer and wheat straw come to around $2650.00. I am estimating this project to take 2 days w/the massive amount of tractor time involved trucking the stone and moving dirt. I am bidding this job at $5410.00. What do you guys think? Does the bid sound about right?

kris
05-16-2002, 10:40 PM
Sorry ..not much to say on the price but a concern in this area would be that you have to go through many proper channels to get approval to work on any waterfront ... I believe she would not own this creek and you may be in for some huge fines.

Mykster
05-17-2002, 03:07 AM
Is there any form of life in this creek? Fish or any other wildlife? The reason I ask is the fact if there is the Dept. of Fish and Wildlife will be all over you for altering their habitat and, they have their own ways of doing these type of jobs. At least in my area anyway.

thelawnguy
05-17-2002, 08:17 AM
You generally need to get all sorts of permits and permissions to do any work in any kind of wetland area and this includes streams ponds drainage basins etc. Do your homework first since DEP EPA Army Corp of Engineers etc are not very forgiving.

AGLA
05-17-2002, 06:02 PM
Wetlands Protection Act (usually governs work within 100' from resource area)
Rivers Act (usually governs work within 200' from edge of stream)

...are both federal acts that would come into play here. They are usually permitted and enforced by the state and local conservation regulatory agency, but applicability is usually determined at the local level.