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View Full Version : Is this bad for my truck??


STIHL GUY
11-25-2009, 12:26 AM
i have an automatic Ford Ranger 4.0 V6. i was wondering if it is bad for the engine/transmission for me to shift into low gears 1 or 2 to slow down when towing??

Jpeg lawn maintenance
11-25-2009, 12:48 AM
look at it this way what is cheaper brakes or a transmission thats how i look at it good luck.

STIHL GUY
11-25-2009, 12:52 AM
look at it this way what is cheaper brakes or a transmission thats how i look at it good luck.

lol i was thinking that same thing the other day but wasnt sure if it was actually damaging the truck

Jpeg lawn maintenance
11-25-2009, 12:54 AM
lol i was thinking that same thing the other day but wasnt sure if it was actually damaging the truck

Ya i would assume its not god for it thats small truck i woul just fan the brakes.

MnGreen
11-25-2009, 03:57 AM
i have an automatic Ford Ranger 4.0 V6. i was wondering if it is bad for the engine/transmission for me to shift into low gears 1 or 2 to slow down when towing??

I wouldn't be dumping it in to low other then to "start" loaded and up hill maybe.
Slower speeds and down shift to 2nd accordingly when stopping issues arise.

Jason'sLawnCare
11-25-2009, 09:45 AM
Engine braking. The wear would be minimal on the tranny but still there. It's good for going downhills while loaded when the breaks would overheat. Just obviously don't overrev it, although it may be electronically controlled and not allow you to downshift to too low of a gear.

topsites
11-25-2009, 08:36 PM
No, it's not good for it at all, automatic transmission are designed to be left in the D position at ALL times,
the gears work on bands and what you're doing is burning those bands, keep doing it and soon the whole thing
will start to slipping and then you get to pay for a rebuild or buy another, so if you want to shift get a standard.

Now if I were you I would take it to a transmission place and get them to change the fluid and filter immediately,
it's probably gotten contaminated with metal shavings due to the wear on those steel bands, that's if you want to play it safe.
I change it in mine every 10k miles, religiously.

How do I know this...
Took me a while to figure it out, but after about the 5th or 6th transmission, I had it down.

On that note you really need a bigger truck, the brakes on that puny p'up are nowhere near beefy enough.

Jason'sLawnCare
11-25-2009, 11:44 PM
No, it's not good for it at all, automatic transmission are designed to be left in the D position at ALL times,
the gears work on bands and what you're doing is burning those bands, keep doing it and soon the whole thing
will start to slipping and then you get to pay for a rebuild or buy another, so if you want to shift get a standard.

Now if I were you I would take it to a transmission place and get them to change the fluid and filter immediately,
it's probably gotten contaminated with metal shavings due to the wear on those steel bands, that's if you want to play it safe.
I change it in mine every 10k miles, religiously.

How do I know this...
Took me a while to figure it out, but after about the 5th or 6th transmission, I had it down.

On that note you really need a bigger truck, the brakes on that puny p'up are nowhere near beefy enough.


Even when you park? Damn. I've been doing it wrong. I put it in P when I park.

Moderen automatics are a little more reliable than the feet thru the floor board you used to drive.

zabmasonry
11-26-2009, 01:58 PM
I personally avoid the brake pedal like the plague, although i generally drive stick ( in which case i usually avoid the clutch) but when I'm in an auto I tend to usually keep it in drive, i like to drop it out of over drive to slow when coming off the highway or something of that sort, and very rarely drop it into 2 (or 3 depending on the vehicle) to slow at lower speeds.

mnglocker
11-26-2009, 02:11 PM
Even when you park? Damn. I've been doing it wrong. I put it in P when I park.

Moderen automatics are a little more reliable than the feet thru the floor board you used to drive.

Not quite. Older transmissiona have far less components to break, and they weren't designed to be soft shifting sissy ride propulsion gear boxes either.


Down shifting on an auto is absolute hell on the bands and clutches. When decellerating your foot is off the throtle and no longer pulling on the Transmission's TV Cable (throtle valve) that controls line pressure... The hydraulic pressure needed by the solinoids to properly apply the band pressure needed to prevent excess slipping.

So if you like burning up the bands and heating the crap out of your transmission, be my guest, I'll even refer you to a good tranny shop that will through me some commission. :cool2:

Jason'sLawnCare
11-26-2009, 02:47 PM
^^^ as long as you maintain your trans and don't bang back and forth between gears unnecessarily, the it will be fine.

Also don't coast in neutral.

Jason'sLawnCare
11-26-2009, 03:35 PM
Not quite. Older transmissiona have far less components to break, and they weren't designed to be soft shifting sissy ride propulsion gear boxes either.


Down shifting on an auto is absolute hell on the bands and clutches. When decellerating your foot is off the throtle and no longer pulling on the Transmission's TV Cable (throtle valve) that controls line pressure... The hydraulic pressure needed by the solinoids to properly apply the band pressure needed to prevent excess slipping.

So if you like burning up the bands and heating the crap out of your transmission, be my guest, I'll even refer you to a good tranny shop that will through me some commission. :cool2:

As much as I appreciate your offer to refer me to a good tranny shop it won't be neccesary.

Per my trucks manual.

http://www.tacomaworld.com/gallery/data/500/medium/DSC_0071re.jpg (http://www.tacomaworld.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/50405/cat/500)



http://www.tacomaworld.com/gallery/data/500/medium/DSC_0072re.jpg (http://www.tacomaworld.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/50406/cat/500)

hosejockey2002
11-26-2009, 06:35 PM
Down shifting on an auto is absolute hell on the bands and clutches. When decellerating your foot is off the throtle and no longer pulling on the Transmission's TV Cable (throtle valve) that controls line pressure... The hydraulic pressure needed by the solinoids to properly apply the band pressure needed to prevent excess slipping.

If I'm not mistaken, most transmissions made in this century are electronically controlled, with no physical linkage hooked to the accelerator pedal. In fact, modern automatics are actually designed to downshift when braking (when in tow haul mode). Why would the manufacturers design the transmissions to do something that was harmful?

93Chevy
11-26-2009, 06:40 PM
When I downshift in my auto, I always throw it in neutral, rev the engine, and try to match the revs before I throw it into 2 so the engine is going the same speed.

AAXteriors
11-26-2009, 11:53 PM
In all of my trucks ( Fords and dodges ranging from 1500's to 3500's) the manuals say to downshift with a auto trans to help you slow down when hauling heavy loads.

STIHL GUY
11-27-2009, 12:22 AM
In all of my trucks ( Fords and dodges ranging from 1500's to 3500's) the manuals say to downshift with a auto trans to help you slow down when hauling heavy loads.

well thats what i usually do but after reading these responces i wont be doing that anymore

AAXteriors
11-27-2009, 05:07 PM
well thats what i usually do but after reading these responces i wont be doing that anymore

Im not saying that what others have said isn't true but why would truck manufactures state that you can downshift with an auto trans to help slow the vehicle down?

pusher21
11-27-2009, 08:31 PM
Not quite. Older transmissiona have far less components to break, and they weren't designed to be soft shifting sissy ride propulsion gear boxes either.


Down shifting on an auto is absolute hell on the bands and clutches. When decellerating your foot is off the throtle and no longer pulling on the Transmission's TV Cable (throtle valve) that controls line pressure... The hydraulic pressure needed by the solinoids to properly apply the band pressure needed to prevent excess slipping.

So if you like burning up the bands and heating the crap out of your transmission, be my guest, I'll even refer you to a good tranny shop that will through me some commission. :cool2:



TV cables? they havent used those in for a while now.

greendave
11-27-2009, 08:51 PM
Every time you manually shift that transmission into a lower gear to 'brake' your rig you are asking the friction material in the transmission clutch packs to slow all that weight down. And you are asking the transmission fluid to endure the excess heat of that action, causing it to break down faster, causing it to lose it's lubricating properties.

Brake pads are a hell of a lot cheaper to replace than clutch packs in a tranny.

WHY would you want to replace those expensive parts instead of brake pads?????

DUH.

but then again, I'll bet the transmission chain stores would encourage this behavior.

clinicalengineer
11-28-2009, 08:10 PM
The RENTAL truck i was driving when my oil pump crapped out was equipped with a jake brake:laugh::laugh:. You just had to shift into it when you need it haha. It sure did sound like a jake brake when i shifted into P while rolling:laugh::laugh:.

LCPullman
11-29-2009, 05:50 PM
No, it's not good for it at all, automatic transmission are designed to be left in the D position at ALL times,
the gears work on bands and what you're doing is burning those bands, keep doing it and soon the whole thing
will start to slipping and then you get to pay for a rebuild or buy another, so if you want to shift get a standard.

Now if I were you I would take it to a transmission place and get them to change the fluid and filter immediately,
it's probably gotten contaminated with metal shavings due to the wear on those steel bands, that's if you want to play it safe.
I change it in mine every 10k miles, religiously.

How do I know this...
Took me a while to figure it out, but after about the 5th or 6th transmission, I had it down.

On that note you really need a bigger truck, the brakes on that puny p'up are nowhere near beefy enough.

If that is entirely the case, then I wonder why we have tow-haul modes on the newest transmissions which automatically down shift to slow down the truck. On my Chevy - Allison you can put it on cruise and go down some pretty steep grades (with load e.g. 14,000LB trailer) and it will keep you down to speed. (I don't believe the manufacturer would give you this feature if it ruined your tranny - they would open themselves up to liability and lawsuits)
The tow haul mode does lock up the TC which greatly reduces heat generation.

I will agree that you need good trans oil cooling, but then you need good cooling for any towing. I definately support running synthetic oil, which many of the newer transmissions already do.

I think that if you have ever gone down a long steep grade using your brakes and wound up with hot weak brakes at the bottom, you would gladly use the engine/tranny to brake you.

Any way, I down shift on all my auto trannies (4L60, 4L80 & Allison 1000) and haven't had any problems. Of course I can't vouch for any trannies which are lighter duty.

greendave
11-29-2009, 08:35 PM
If that is entirely the case, then I wonder why we have tow-haul modes on the newest transmissions which automatically down shift to slow down the truck. On my Chevy - Allison you can put it on cruise and go down some pretty steep grades (with load e.g. 14,000LB trailer) and it will keep you down to speed. (I don't believe the manufacturer would give you this feature if it ruined your tranny - they would open themselves up to liability and lawsuits)
The tow haul mode does lock up the TC which greatly reduces heat generation.

I will agree that you need good trans oil cooling, but then you need good cooling for any towing. I definately support running synthetic oil, which many of the newer transmissions already do.

I think that if you have ever gone down a long steep grade using your brakes and wound up with hot weak brakes at the bottom, you would gladly use the engine/tranny to brake you.

Any way, I down shift on all my auto trannies (4L60, 4L80 & Allison 1000) and haven't had any problems. Of course I can't vouch for any trannies which are lighter duty.

that 4L60 is not a heavy duty transmission

LCPullman
11-30-2009, 01:21 AM
that 4L60 is not a heavy duty transmission

Your right, but its heavier duty than alot of FWD car trannys, which is what I had in mind. The 4L60 can handle towing within the limits of a 1/2 ton truck, which is nearly 10,000 LB on some of the newer ones, and it comes with a tow-haul mode.

White Gardens
11-30-2009, 01:39 AM
i have an automatic Ford Ranger 4.0 V6. i was wondering if it is bad for the engine/transmission for me to shift into low gears 1 or 2 to slow down when towing??

Drive in 3rd, not D. Third will help you slow down better and you won't be shifting or "hunting" for 4th or 3rd. This is probably the hardest abuse on a tranny.

All smaller displacement trucks are recommended to tow in 3rd. I always haul in my S-10 in third and don't feel the need to down-shift when coming to a stop.

South Florida Lawns
12-01-2009, 01:48 AM
Down shifting's for b*****s.

LindblomRJ
12-01-2009, 04:15 PM
Watch the shifting and transmission temperature. Constant shifting heats up the transmission. If it does lock it down a gear. Again since the 90s transmissions are electronically controlled.

Rangers have a overdrive lockout. Its a good idea to utilize that feature. If there is a tow/haul mode use it when pulling a trailer. It keeps the temperature down and shifts are a lot more crisp.

The newer tow/haul mode Ford uses when pulling will downshift automatically. Using the transmission to hold back speed should not be harmful on newer vehicles.

mnglocker
12-05-2009, 10:57 AM
TV cables? they havent used those in for a while now.


GM 700R4, Chrysler 44RE, 46RE, 47R/RE, 48RE, off the top of my head. I do believe Dodge used those trannies up until about 2004?

The only thing electronic on the Chrysler transmissions I listed is the torque converter lock-up solinoid.

topsites
12-05-2009, 11:54 AM
If that is entirely the case, then I wonder why we have tow-haul modes on the newest transmissions which automatically down shift to slow down the truck. On my Chevy - Allison you can put it on cruise and go down some pretty steep grades (with load e.g. 14,000LB trailer) and it will keep you down to speed. (I don't believe the manufacturer would give you this feature if it ruined your tranny - they would open themselves up to liability and lawsuits)
The tow haul mode does lock up the TC which greatly reduces heat generation.

I will agree that you need good trans oil cooling, but then you need good cooling for any towing. I definately support running synthetic oil, which many of the newer transmissions already do.

I think that if you have ever gone down a long steep grade using your brakes and wound up with hot weak brakes at the bottom, you would gladly use the engine/tranny to brake you.

Any way, I down shift on all my auto trannies (4L60, 4L80 & Allison 1000) and haven't had any problems. Of course I can't vouch for any trannies which are lighter duty.

Fair enough but what takes an Allison and an S-10 are two completely different trucks, according to a quick search the Allison
goes into anything from a Silverado to an F-350 and possibly bigger, evidently it's a transmission that not only fits a variety of
beefier trucks but it also leads me to believe it might come in a variety of flavors.

The reason I come off strong was because some folks, you give them an inch...
And so it wasn't an S-10, but a Ranger...
Now I'm guessing the Ranger is a go-between the S-10 and the 1/2 ton,
but that doesn't make it capable of big jobs all of the sudden either.

At least I thought it was for a diesel, this Allison, then you speak of 14,000 pounds of weight...

Anyhow, you change your trans oil and filter every 10,000 miles like you're supposed to, and when you do so
you of course inspect the pan for shavings and you know full and well what you're doing, then you can do
with that transmission what you want, I think.

All right, I can deal with the o/d feature for towing, I'll also give in there.

But it's a whole lot easier, if you need to slow down, to let off the gas a ways up the road.
Because if you want to be relatively certain that your tranny isn't going to drop out on you
somewhere down the road, then you leave that POS in D and don't touch it!

XLS
12-05-2009, 01:25 PM
sthil guy it is fine the manufactures recomend you do so as you are doing it correctly
change fluids and its the same as changing brakes if you hit your brakes long enough with your load on a hill its not brakes you replace it s brakes rotors and drum work

the auto is designed to slip with out damage , like it dosent slip everyday when your going down the road come to a hill let off the gas , the torque converter lets off and the rpms drop then at the bottom you touch the gas to make it up the other side , WAIT the transmission just slipped because you foot reved the engine and the fluid passed through the valve body as designed until it formed enough pressure to grab and pull .
most truck do this fine 1000s of time a week it does use the clutches to hold the pressure but the fluid is the slippng factor overall . we run heavy loaded rangers with 3.0/4.0 v-6's with push button overdrive and they are doing just fine after 100k no problems