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Chilehead
12-11-2009, 11:31 AM
I have a question about fire pits/fire code. Where I live, the law says that no open burning may take place closer than 30 feet to a residence. I have a customer who wants a patio with a built in fire pit. The pit would be closer than 30 feet to the house. If one were to burn/cook food in it, would that technically be considered open burning? I don't want to install a fire pit, and then be called back should the customer get a citation and then not be allowed to use it. It would be built with Pyzique and would use the fire insert. Thanks.

Dreams To Designs
12-11-2009, 07:29 PM
Contact the local fire official or fire marshal, laws are different in every state, county, town and sometimes individual fire districts.

Kirk

Chilehead
12-11-2009, 08:34 PM
Contact the local fire official or fire marshal, laws are different in every state, county, town and sometimes individual fire districts.

Kirk

I already did, hence my knowledge of the code. When I asked, "Does this mean I can't build a fire pit?", all they do is repeat the code. They won't give me a yes or no.

lawnspecialties
12-11-2009, 08:44 PM
When we've responded to "illegal burning" calls here (Raleigh), if the people were using it for cooking, we couldn't do a thing. Even last year during the drought and burning ban.

Oddly enough, during a certain stage of the burning ban, people out of the city limits could burn yard waste ONLY if it was within 100 ft. of the residence and they had some type of extinguishing device (water hose, extinguisher, etc.) with them. That shows you how regulations differ from region to region.

In my opinion, a fire pit would be legal but that's just my opinion. Go ask the fire station guys who would respond to this particular house. They'd be the first ones to have to interpret the law in this situation.

Chilehead
12-11-2009, 10:37 PM
Go ask the fire station guys who would respond to this particular house. They'd be the first ones to have to interpret the law in this situation.

See my above post.

glaciator
12-12-2009, 10:19 AM
I've seen guys slap a hamburger onto a rock next to a bon fire. The fire marshal said that makes it a BBQ, not a bon fire so they didn't get a ticket. That said, to limit your liability, I'd suggest that the homeowner decides where to put the fire pit and takes all responsibility for it. If it does not need a permit, then build it where they tell you. Put the responsibility on the owner to research the law.

Isobel
12-12-2009, 10:24 AM
well if the fire guys aren't giving you a clear answer, and people here will give you all sorts of different answers--go find another source closer to you. Either go to town hall, and ask the building inspector there, or go chat with a lawyer. I say a lawyer b/c if someone gets a stiff fine for having a firepit, you might need one.

Most likely though, when they just "repeat the code," the answer is "no." Gotta read between the lines.

Chilehead
12-12-2009, 11:08 AM
Most likely though, when they just "repeat the code," the answer is "no." Gotta read between the lines.

Yeah, I thought so. Imagine me telling the customer that it is not illegal to own one, just be ready to face a misdemeanor if you use it. Stupid government.

Isobel
12-12-2009, 12:08 PM
Yeah, I thought so. Imagine me telling the customer that it is not illegal to own one, just be ready to face a misdemeanor if you use it. Stupid government.

yep. :)

good luck.

neckbone
12-13-2009, 11:40 AM
the laws are funny you can burn a tree limb but if you make a 2 x4 out of it you can't burn it

Isobel
12-13-2009, 12:57 PM
yea but a 2x4 generally differs from a tree limb as 2x4's are dried. Most tree limbs have some sort of moisture content to them.

Toy2
12-13-2009, 01:06 PM
I was a FF years ago, and my understanding of the law states that if its used to cook something, one can do it......we rolled up on a guy burning pallets and when he saw us he grabbed a bag of hot dogs and a large metal rod and we had our hands tied and this was a large department.............I say build it..........

lawnrx
12-14-2009, 10:40 AM
I work for DEKALB FIRE. So in henry it may be a little different. but if you call it a open grill with a grate on top of it. it just work.

Stuttering Stan
12-14-2009, 07:55 PM
As mentioned above, it is legal to have a fire for food preparation purposes. A fire pit will be a very small volume of fire/smoke. The fire code is intended to limit risky fires, such as brush, bonfires, etc.
There is also a common sense issue here. If someone is burning a large pile of leaves and has a marshmellow close by, obviously the marshmellow was not intended for the fire.

castle555
12-20-2009, 06:41 PM
In California we have our own EPA and Air Resources Board -a nightmare of regulation.
Now fire code- UFC 2007 Edition or ? Your local city ordinances.
30" min.clearance from ordinary combustibles to protect from radiant -just don't make it a bonfire.
On the design side I usually try to convince the customer to use a portable type pit. Instead of a built-in. Here's a couple of my projects attached pics.

Use piped-in natural gas or propane with a burner instead of a carbon fire.
call it a barbeque -for roasting marshmallows or else it is for cooking (that smoked salmon)
30 year FF -retired.
Check out this really good company -I've used them for custom built burners.
www.moderustic.com/Fire-Pits-2.html

KC lawn guy
02-10-2010, 11:43 AM
here in kc its like in other places, if you have hot dogs or marshmellows it is not just a fire. we cant do a thing if they have those out there. but i would also write on the contract that the home owner take all responseability so if they get a ticket from the fire marshal they dont send the ticket to you or have you remove it. ask the marshal about the hotdog thing that could make it legal for ya