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View Full Version : Name that plant-3


Lite4
12-28-2009, 09:30 PM
I planted these about 3 years ago.

Common Name:
Botanical Name:

What is your guess?

STRINGALATION
12-29-2009, 12:00 PM
yucca?
:>....

Isobel
12-29-2009, 03:11 PM
looks like Yucca

Twitchy
12-29-2009, 03:42 PM
looks like Yucca
Looks like something they run over during the Baja 1000. LOL

Lite4
12-29-2009, 08:12 PM
Yes, it is a yucca. What variety?

Isobel
12-29-2009, 09:58 PM
no clue on that, none of our around here get up that high.

AGLA
12-30-2009, 07:01 AM
I'm guessing that it is a young Joshua tree.

STRINGALATION
12-30-2009, 05:35 PM
hey fly i'm sure thats your up lighting on those

Az Gardener
12-30-2009, 07:14 PM
I'm guessing that it is a young Joshua tree.

Its not a Joshua their spines/frawns are shorter, more rigid and more of a gray/blue color.

It looks a little like an elata but not quite, frawns are too wide and not close enough together also missing the white tips.

I have looked at that picture for quite a while on several occasions but I can't figure it out.

We have all kind of yucca's here but not that variety. It must be pretty hardy to take the Indy winters. Yuccas are amazing in their diversity.

Lite4
12-30-2009, 11:08 PM
We imported 7 different varieties of trunked Yuccas for this project in Boise. Yucca Elata's fronds are more ridgid and stand straight out from the crown, Yucca brevifolia (joshua tree) has shorter, stiffer leaves that are generally born on multiple branches. This variety of Yucca that is shown has leaves that are pendulous and not nearly as stiff. I will post photos of some of the other Yuccas we planted there also.
And yes, they are incredibly hardy. They are thriving in the Boise climate. I have found also that, although they are able to withstand very dry conditions, when they are watered very regularly and have very good drainage they produce some absolutely incredibly deep, rich green full foliage and much more rapid growth.

Lite4
12-30-2009, 11:14 PM
Here is the Yucca brevifolia (Joshua Tree)* We have about 30 of these in this development.

Lite4
12-30-2009, 11:21 PM
Yucca elata

Lite4
12-30-2009, 11:27 PM
Yucca faxoniana

Lite4
12-30-2009, 11:32 PM
Yucca torreyi

Lite4
12-30-2009, 11:39 PM
Yucca rigida

NORTHWOOD LANDSCAPE SER.
01-02-2010, 09:58 PM
This is my first time posting on this site, however and correct me if I'm wrong but I think it is a Yucca 'rostrata'. My gut and my experience tells me it is a rostrata because of the growth rate and the shape of the head. My second guess would be a Yucca 'thompson'. Thanks Greg

Lite4
01-03-2010, 04:22 PM
This is my first time posting on this site, however and correct me if I'm wrong but I think it is a Yucca 'rostrata'. My gut and my experience tells me it is a rostrata because of the growth rate and the shape of the head. My second guess would be a Yucca 'thompson'. Thanks Greg

Good Job, you nailed it! This is one of my favorite yuccas. I am sure you see them everywhere there in Texas.

Groomer
01-05-2010, 03:26 PM
Those grow in Boise? who'd a thunk it. Do they grow in Indy, is the question.

NORTHWOOD LANDSCAPE SER.
01-05-2010, 04:04 PM
There are a lot of yuccas in West Texas and growers, designers and wholesalers are pushing the trends into Dallas and Ft. Worth. I am also suprised that they grow that far north. One of the leading suppliers that I use is Southwest Wholesale Nursery in Carrollton, Texas.

Lite4
01-05-2010, 08:51 PM
Well they are certainly not native to Boise I can tell you that for sure. We harvested them out of Texas, Arizona and Nevada. They have been in for 4 winters now and they are just thriving. Typically they grow in the high desert and can stand some very low temps. Some of them can go easily -10 to -20 for short durations without any problems, however Boise is not that cold. They are also a high desert and usually see winter temps of around 5 for a low temp. We also planted 3 varieties of Agave, 3 varieties of prickly pear (opuntia), cholla, ocatillo (which did not do too well) and numerous cactus varieties that are doing very well. You just have to study their native climates, find hardier varieties and be adventurous.

Now will they grow in Indy? Well, I would say it is a very good possibility. Indy is only 1/2 a climate zone colder than Boise. There is a big difference in annual rainfall though. 70+ inches of rain in Indy vs. 12 inches in Boise annually. I have found though, that with good drainage the yuccas actually look and grow better with regular watering as oppossed to struggling along in the desert. So I would say, yes, I would give em a try here. You would have to bring in a truck from the south though. Nurseries aren't as daring as I am.

PlantNut
01-06-2010, 04:09 PM
Nolinaceae family (Beaucarnea, Dasylirion, and Calibanus) also have this neat look. Beaucarnea's tend to be to warmth loving, but some of the Dasylirion are fairly cold tolerant if on the dry side, and Calibanus has been seen down to the low teens if not too wet. But some of the yucca family are better at the cold for longer periods of time. Nice photos.

Lite4
01-06-2010, 07:01 PM
Nolinaceae family (Beaucarnea, Dasylirion, and Calibanus) also have this neat look. Beaucarnea's tend to be to warmth loving, but some of the Dasylirion are fairly cold tolerant if on the dry side, and Calibanus has been seen down to the low teens if not too wet. But some of the yucca family are better at the cold for longer periods of time. Nice photos.

We planted probably about 20 Dasylirions (desert spoons). About half of them survived the first season and the rest have done ok but not great. Just slightly too cold in Boise for that plant, just like the ocatillo.