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View Full Version : When to Advertise?


dwight1moore
12-31-2009, 12:01 AM
I did ok in my first year. I managed to maintain 17 yards on a regular basis but now i wanna double that in 2010. I'm always advertising but when would you guys say primetime is. I'm gonna say mowing begins about mid to late march here in my area. I have heard some say the first of the year is when they start but i dont wanna go out and waste flyers, business cards, etc. now and then the people forget about me 3 months down the road. BUT if i wait closer to mowing time i could be to late and the people already have someone else. What is yall guys suggestions?

CkLandscapingOrlando
12-31-2009, 08:01 AM
I say watch the big box stores. They spend millions to target the right product at the right time. When they start pushing out doors you start the same

RigglePLC
12-31-2009, 12:07 PM
Prime time is about the date of the grass greenup, about April 15 in Michigan. The first mowing is about a week or two after that.

bohiaa
12-31-2009, 04:44 PM
about a month b4 the season starts

LandscapeSavannah
12-31-2009, 09:04 PM
I stay in the eye. Advertise all year. When you suddenly pop up in the spring- you look just like all the people that sat at home deciding to start a "lawn care company."

DA Quality Lawn & YS
01-01-2010, 03:07 AM
about a month b4 the season starts

I agree, so OP for you, around Valentines Day.
Also agree - keep your name in front of people at all times in the offseason using whatever method of marketing suits you.

Kennedy Landscaping
01-01-2010, 04:05 AM
I plan to start within a week hammering the town with flyers.

dwight1moore
01-04-2010, 11:46 AM
sounds good guys, thanks for the input

tinman
01-05-2010, 07:23 PM
I'd advertise alll year to keep your name at the front of folks minds then kick it up a notch a few weeks before busy season.

lawnkingforever
01-05-2010, 08:06 PM
I try to keep my name out there year around, but I wait to do any flyers until mid-March. With so many people doing lawncare now and pushing hard in the Spring, I actually have picked up more new customers in June than in the Spring. It works out good, the scrubs do the hard work during the heavy growth and rainy season and then they give up after a couple months and I am there to pick up the pieces. Then it is smooth sailing until fall.

JAMEYBAXTER
01-06-2010, 04:53 PM
The right time to advertise depends on a few things:

(1) what are you advertising
(2) to whom are you advertising
(3) why are you advertising
(4) how are you advertising

Then you get into
(1) Product
(2) Promotion
(3) Place
(4) Price

I assume you are wanting to advertise to drum up new business. Are you advertising to "past/current" business yet? I would advise you to market to "lost" business right now as well, and right after the start of the season when their "new" company has taken over. Buyers' remorse is a high motivator for people to switch back, especially if you did a good job.

You obviously aren't advertising your actual service to happen anytime soon, so you would be foolish to make it seem like you are gonna shop up ready to cut or treat tomorrow. Give the customer a reason to contact you. If a lawn service were to come to my house today to ask about acquiring my business, but had not compelling reason as to WHY I should decide to go with them now, I would laugh. There is SNOW on the ground, and it is 23 degrees in January. Without a reason for them to respond now, you are wasting time and money.

Doubling from 17 to 34 isn't really THAT much more business in pure numbers. If you get one job close to each of your currently served, and you have doubled. I would think that for your purpose, knocking down a few doors might be highly beneficial. Get a "professional looking" flyer or brochure. Not a kinko's black and white or something that looks like you did it on Word. Ask your current clients if you can use them as a reference. Then you are selling to new people by "partnering" with a person that they live close to.


On a side note,
Know your product and the cost associated with it. Ask the potential customers if you can see their prior invoices so that you can quote them an "apples to apples" comparison. Find out their needs. That way, you can see if you are offering more than they previously had, or if the cost for you to serve them is going to be more than your actual "cost". Maybe the "offer" is a cost comparison.

bohiaa
01-06-2010, 05:04 PM
The right time to advertise depends on a few things:

(1) what are you advertising
(2) to whom are you advertising
(3) why are you advertising
(4) how are you advertising

Then you get into
(1) Product
(2) Promotion
(3) Place
(4) Price

I assume you are wanting to advertise to drum up new business. Are you advertising to "past/current" business yet? I would advise you to market to "lost" business right now as well, and right after the start of the season when their "new" company has taken over. Buyers' remorse is a high motivator for people to switch back, especially if you did a good job.

You obviously aren't advertising your actual service to happen anytime soon, so you would be foolish to make it seem like you are gonna shop up ready to cut or treat tomorrow. Give the customer a reason to contact you. If a lawn service were to come to my house today to ask about acquiring my business, but had not compelling reason as to WHY I should decide to go with them now, I would laugh. There is SNOW on the ground, and it is 23 degrees in January. Without a reason for them to respond now, you are wasting time and money.

Doubling from 17 to 34 isn't really THAT much more business in pure numbers. If you get one job close to each of your currently served, and you have doubled. I would think that for your purpose, knocking down a few doors might be highly beneficial. Get a "professional looking" flyer or brochure. Not a kinko's black and white or something that looks like you did it on Word. Ask your current clients if you can use them as a reference. Then you are selling to new people by "partnering" with a person that they live close to.


On a side note,
Know your product and the cost associated with it. Ask the potential customers if you can see their prior invoices so that you can quote them an "apples to apples" comparison. Find out their needs. That way, you can see if you are offering more than they previously had, or if the cost for you to serve them is going to be more than your actual "cost". Maybe the "offer" is a cost comparison.

Kind of .............DUH.. dont ya think :hammerhead: