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lsylvain
01-12-2010, 09:27 AM
I am thinking about scaling back to a single axle trailer since gas is predicted to take another big hike and also because the dual axle trailers seem to burn through tires quicker. I am wondering if people can give me some input into how many miles they are getting on their tires for single and double axle trailers?

I go through 2 sets a year it seems like. So I would save 50% by having only 2 tires to replace each time plus single axle trailers should last longer with tires since there is no drag on the rear tires when you turn.

Any thoughts?

ALC-GregH
01-12-2010, 09:33 AM
I need tires on my single axle trailer after the second year with it.

Littleriver1
01-12-2010, 09:34 AM
Are you under inflating the tires? I max mine out and get 2 yrs out of them. I also switched to radial tires. If you are not halling a lot of weight then switch to single axle. If you are maxing the weight of the trailer then stay with 2 axles.

vanncann
01-12-2010, 11:08 AM
It sounds like you either need new axles or you need your current axles aligned. I get about 40,000 miles out of a set of radials, about 2.5 years.

dishboy
01-12-2010, 11:10 AM
If your axle is straight and you buy long wearing tread you should get what the tire is rated at for mileage. That said I seem to have my right tire separate and self destruct every 1.5 years and never have problems on the left. I don't know if the issue is coincidental or if I have another problem.

sjessen
01-12-2010, 11:44 AM
I have a tandem axle trailer and am lucky to get 6000 miles per set of tires. Weight distribution has something to do with it because the front ones last twice as long as the rears. the main thing that kills tread life on this trailer is turns. The tread is worn off as the trailer goes around the corners.

dwlah
01-12-2010, 11:46 AM
IDK Ive never worn out a set usually the tires find something in the road and have to be replaced before the tread is gone

A Leaf Above
01-12-2010, 08:27 PM
I have a tandem axle trailer and am lucky to get 6000 miles per set of tires. Weight distribution has something to do with it because the front ones last twice as long as the rears. the main thing that kills tread life on this trailer is turns. The tread is worn off as the trailer goes around the corners.

Same here ..The rears always wear faster than the fronts ..I think it has to do with the tire dragging during turning ..I also do not use trailer tires anymore ..I run all car steel belted tires on my trailer..I dunno whether its the heat down here or what , but the trailer tires only last 3-4 months tops ...

Mike Blevins
01-12-2010, 09:00 PM
I'm still on my first set of tires on my 2004 single axle trailer. I got an extra set of tire covers with my camper that work really well in the winter. I give the tires a good scrubbing and then on goes the tire protectant and the covers.

lsylvain
01-12-2010, 10:09 PM
Are you under inflating the tires? I max mine out and get 2 yrs out of them. I also switched to radial tires. If you are not halling a lot of weight then switch to single axle. If you are maxing the weight of the trailer then stay with 2 axles.

Are you running singles or doubles?

lsylvain
01-12-2010, 10:10 PM
IDK Ive never worn out a set usually the tires find something in the road and have to be replaced before the tread is gone

Singles or doubles?

lsylvain
01-12-2010, 10:15 PM
It sounds like you either need new axles or you need your current axles aligned. I get about 40,000 miles out of a set of radials, about 2.5 years.

Good god. How are you getting 40,000 miles out of a trailer tire? I'm sure you are running only a small single axle. That is nearly 4 times what the tire makers say they last.

topsites
01-12-2010, 10:58 PM
I couldn't say on a double but I can tell you on a single axle weight is a major consideration, more than
anything that's what wears the tires, so the heavier you like to load, the faster they will wear.

More so most trailers come with bias-plies from the factory, or at least mine did,
biggest POS tire you've ever owned lol, but they last about one season.

For this reason the tires I run are radial C-load rated, they're one step over the manufacturer's "best tire" recommendation
and two to three steps up from the bias plies, they run about $100 each + labor but I get at LEAST two full years of service
out of them, I find a 6-ply tire is well worth the extra expense, the sidewalls are so good you can ALMOST run them flat.
That's not saying yours would last as long, but definitely on a single axle trailer DO get radials.

Worst thing is you HAVE to watch the axle when loading, 6-ply tires give little indication in way of tell-tale signs that your trailer's
getting too heavy, keep in mind if you overload a single axle trailer too heavy you'll bend the frame or bust the axle or the springs.

My tires call for 50 psi but I run 55 in them because I frequently carry a bit of weight.
Couldn't say what others will hold but my 6x12 will haul up to 3 thousand pounds...
I've carried two cubic yards of dirt in it before, supposedly that's 4 thousand, not sure but it also holds 5 cubic yards of mulch.

Tell you what thou, better get the best trailer your money can buy, I spent 1500 (+ttlir) on mine 8 years ago.

Ooomwizard
01-26-2010, 02:38 AM
First, is your trailer level? Adjust car/truck tongue height to provide a level trailer. (important!)

Second, use radial tires. (I overinflate by 5 psi.)

Third, if electric braked, is you're braking level too high?

Fourth, there should be more weight in front of the trailer axles than behind. (Prevents swaying.)

Fifth, use only "trailer" tires.

Sixth, only same size trailer tires and wheels.

7th, don't overload.

8, don't underinflate. Causes heat which degrades.

Sure there are more hints but these are probably main concerns.

At $100 a pop it can add up to a signifant expense.

GL!

topsites
01-26-2010, 03:29 AM
At $100 a pop it can add up to a signifant expense.

Correct, and on a double axle the wear is so different from my own that I could not say but at least on a single
axle a cheaper tire may not be a better deal, whether the most expensive tire is the best deal is another story,
but certainly I feel on a single axle a good tire is cheaper in the long run.

Case in point, I can get bias-plies I think around $60-70 each.
They last one year, remember now it costs $20 each for installation as well (+ tdv)
Radials, $100 each +itdv
iTdv = installation, Tax, disposal, valve stem.

So...

Which is cheaper?
(65 + 20) x 2 = $170 a year?
Or...
(105 + 20) x 2 = $250 every two years.

Not counting the time it takes to run down and get them put on now...
It's the same with cars, and trucks, stay away from high performance thou

Richard Martin
01-26-2010, 05:19 AM
Good god. How are you getting 40,000 miles out of a trailer tire? I'm sure you are running only a small single axle. That is nearly 4 times what the tire makers say they last.

If you buy good tires you should easily get more than 10,000 miles out of them. I have Goodyear Marathon radial tires with about 9,000 miles on them. They come with 10/32" tire tread. My rears are down to about 7/32" and my fronts have a little over 8/32" of tread left. I'm going to rotate them today. I expect to get around 35,000 miles total out of them.

These tires are not that expensive. A 205/75R15 is only $86.00. You can get them here... http://www.tirerack.com/tires/Sizes.jsp?make=Goodyear&model=Marathon+Radial

If you're paying $50 a piece for regular trailer tires that go 10,000 miles and $90 a piece for radials that go 35,000 miles then the radials end up being far cheaper in the long run.

$50 X 4 tires X replaced 3.5 times = $700 plus tire mounting 3 times.
$90 x 4 tires only replaced 1 time = $360

Almost half the cost.