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dubb
01-23-2010, 06:08 PM
i have a customer that we will be building a patio for soon and they want a chimney fireplace. i have never done one of these before but have been researching alot about how to build one. if anyone could help me with the basics of building a fireplace it would be greatly appreciated and also about how much do you charge for install? o and if anyone has some pics of some they have built can you please post. thanks

Twitchy
01-23-2010, 07:53 PM
Check into a company called Fire Rock. http://www1.firerock.us/

scagrider22
01-24-2010, 04:30 AM
Pay me to do it!

tthomass
01-24-2010, 02:40 PM
Use that kit ^^^^ and then build around it with block for the shape you desire. Don't ask us how much to charge. Figure how much you need per day/hour and add that to your materials. The kit will be around $1,500.

Bustedblade
01-24-2010, 02:52 PM
Make sure you pour a solid base, I've seen a few of those things tilt after a year or so.
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dubb
01-24-2010, 05:10 PM
i found a dealer that sells the firerock kits that is about 5 miles from me. they seem like a nice and easy way to build a fireplace and also not bad at all on the price. thanks for all the input guys

Pittsburgh Stone83
01-24-2010, 06:31 PM
i have a customer that we will be building a patio for soon and they want a chimney fireplace. i have never done one of these before but have been researching alot about how to build one. if anyone could help me with the basics of building a fireplace it would be greatly appreciated and also about how much do you charge for install? o and if anyone has some pics of some they have built can you please post. thanks

Depending how much you have in the bid will determine how you build it and with what materials. If you want to make it real easy just by a MOD from unilock.

dubb
01-24-2010, 07:38 PM
i have looked at the unilock mods but cant find a dealer anywhere close to chattanooga. also customer is willing to spend from 5-7k for the fireplace, i think the unilock is a little more expensive than that. they dont want nothing huge or real fancy just kindof a medium size fireplace with also a place on one side to store wood and they want the fireplace to have a stone veneer to match what is on their house.

2low4NH
01-24-2010, 10:56 PM
i am currently building a couple prefab units in my shop. i can build these units for under a thousand. the rest is all profit. i am selling my first one around 1800 plus install. i am also a 4th generation mason and grew up around it so bricks run through my blood! i can do them cheap because i have the skills and knowledge.

dubb
01-24-2010, 11:34 PM
i am currently building a couple prefab units in my shop. i can build these units for under a thousand. the rest is all profit. i am selling my first one around 1800 plus install. i am also a 4th generation mason and grew up around it so bricks run through my blood! i can do them cheap because i have the skills and knowledge.

please post some pics, im sure we would all like to see your work!!

2low4NH
01-24-2010, 11:54 PM
heres one for ya! it will be finished 2moro i hope. i plan on doing several over the next month if i get enough local intrest in them

2low4NH
01-24-2010, 11:55 PM
sorry forgot to attach the pic

2low4NH
01-24-2010, 11:59 PM
ok lets try it again

glaciator
01-28-2010, 04:09 PM
2low4nh...I like that. Very cool. I'm not a stone or brick mason (drystack work only thus far), so my question might sound dumb to you....is that what is called "fire brick"? I assume fire brick takes heat better without cracking like "regular" brick? And what about the mortar...how is it different to handle the heat?

Thanks,

2low4NH
01-28-2010, 04:29 PM
the "fire box" is made with fire brick and refractory cement. this is what all fireplaces are done with. the brick you can see in the picture are KF Mohawk Matte solids. they are a typical modular brick. this unit is almost done.
But to answer your question in short regular brick and mortar can handle some heat. they will spall and break apart over time. fire brick are much more dense and are made to handle large amounts of heat. refractory cement is not really a cement at all. i use heat stop brand. there are secrets to working with this that i will not share.

glaciator
01-28-2010, 04:35 PM
Thanks for your answer....i won't ask about the heat stop "cement".

2low4NH
01-28-2010, 06:16 PM
i will tell you this much! you put on a thin layer with a margin trowel and set the brick the koint will be about 1/8 inch thick scrape off the excess. heat stop does not completely set until heat is applied. this stuff is messy to work with but is a great product. if you do it like that it will work just fine but its messy

Paverman
02-25-2010, 06:13 PM
Both Unilock and Anchor/Belgard have pre made units that are placed with a forklift. they are quite pricy Cambridge has kits that can be assembled in less than a day. Also much less expensive since you are providing the labor which you can control.