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View Full Version : 2WD Getting Stuck--tire options


TomberLawn
01-25-2010, 01:15 AM
I really love my truck, except that it's 2wd. It's been stuck in what wouldn't seem to bad situations 4 times in the past 4 months or so. Right now, I've got 245/75/16 mud tires on the back from Aurora (I think they are owned by Kumho).

Most of the time, it seems like the tread just filled up with mud and they start spinning. It doesn't rut really bad, unless it's really soft ground. The tire just sits on the surface (or no more than about 2 inches deep) and spins. The last 2 times I had a trailer behind me.

My thinking is this: I need some wider tires that will have more tread on the ground, giving better traction and more flotation in soft ground. I'm trying to decide if a heavy-duty all terrain will do the job or if I need a really aggressive mud terrain. I'm leaning towards mud.

Trying to decide between 265 or 285 tread width.

I'm looking for tires less than $200 each. If you have suggestions for a good tire for a 2wd truck that will perform off-road and not sing too much on-road, I need them. These have caught my attention:

Goodyear DuraTrac
http://www.goodyeartires.com/goodyeartireselector/display_tire.jsp?prodline=Wrangler+DuraTrac&mrktarea=Light+Truck&treadwidth=265&aspectratio=75&rimdiameter=16&sidewall=OWL&requestFrom=Search%20By%20Size

Mickey Thompson Baja MTZ Radial
http://www.mickeythompsontires.com/truck.php?item=BajaMTZRadial

Kumho MT KL71
http://www.kumhousa.com/Tire.aspx?id=f8656bd8-0a87-4166-82b5-0df52d4ac17e&cat=25

Cooper STT
http://www.coopertire.com/html/products/tires_lighttruck.aspx?page=discoverer_stt

Gravel Rat
01-25-2010, 02:04 AM
My brother has the goodyears you posted they are okay they don't sing but boy are they soft. He is running the 235/85R16 and they are not really long wearing.

What does your truck have in the diff do you have a positraction ?

Have you thought about a ARB selectable locker works as a open diff unlocked and locked its like a spool. Both wheels are locked together and spin together.

topsites
01-25-2010, 02:43 AM
Keep it on the pavement, there you just saved yourself $800 and another tow.

TomberLawn
01-25-2010, 08:31 AM
My truck has a locking diff, so both tires spin.

Glad to hear about the Goodyears being soft. Don't want them wearing down too fast on me.

topsites, the problem is I can't keep it on pavement. I only need 2 tires anyway. I've got brand new Firestone Transforce AT's on the front and they handle great.

srl28
01-25-2010, 09:41 AM
May be a stupid question but often overlooked---if its a pickup or something like that, is there any weight in the bed? If not then your tires arent really making good contact and that could be part of the problem. Sounds like you have decent tires so

93Chevy
01-25-2010, 09:50 AM
I just bought Cooper ATR about a month ago. Awesome tire. I have an extended cab full size bed, so my truck is long and I traditionally need 4wd in the winter. With these new tires, I've been in 4wd once, and that's only because I was at the bottom of an icy driveway with a $40K SUV 4 feet behind me. They also have a 50K tread wear warranty. I'll never buy a different set of tires for a daily driver again. I'm sure the STT will also be a good choice. Plus I have a great Cooper dealer closeby, so that helped narrow the decision for me.

TomberLawn
01-25-2010, 10:46 AM
The bed is usually empty, so not much weight back there. The fuel tank is 34 gallons and usually at least 1/2 full, so that's 100-250 pounds, plus the tongue weight of the trailer. With the tractor on the trailer, the tongue doesn't weigh much because most of the weight is on top of or slightly behind the trailer axles. Three of the four times I've been stuck, the trailer was empty or there was no trailer.

rip&tear
01-25-2010, 11:12 AM
Screw all those weinie tires, there is only one mud tire out there and if you get stuck with that than your farked!

Hold it to the wood and Rip & Tear it up, it will throw sod pieces the size of kittens, they clean out awesome

Let me introduce you to Super Swamper Boggers:

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj39/chick_in_Indiana/ss_bogger.jpg

Yeah baby:drinkup:

srl28
01-25-2010, 11:23 AM
The bed is usually empty, so not much weight back there. The fuel tank is 34 gallons and usually at least 1/2 full, so that's 100-250 pounds, plus the tongue weight of the trailer. With the tractor on the trailer, the tongue doesn't weigh much because most of the weight is on top of or slightly behind the trailer axles. Three of the four times I've been stuck, the trailer was empty or there was no trailer.

Extended cab or crew cab? Long bed? If so that may be your problem, not the tires. No weight in the back is the biggest part sometimes. Wish I a had a dime for everytime I see people in 4x4 pickups driving, or trying to drive, in the snow and getting no where and wondering why. Gotta put weight in that big empty light tail to weigh it down and keep those tires touching pavement.

rcslawncare
01-25-2010, 07:10 PM
Screw all those weinie tires, there is only one mud tire out there and if you get stuck with that than your farked!

Hold it to the wood and Rip & Tear it up, it will throw sod pieces the size of kittens, they clean out awesome

Let me introduce you to Super Swamper Boggers:

http://i268.photobucket.com/albums/jj39/chick_in_Indiana/ss_bogger.jpg

Yeah baby:drinkup:

Those are meats right there!!!

360ci
01-25-2010, 07:22 PM
I'd stick with an A/T tire, but NOT too aggressive, or you'll have more traction problems. If you want to get mud terrains, be sure to get the siped to give you better traction. Runs about $20 a tire, and is worth it!

JMLandscaping
01-25-2010, 09:46 PM
I have a small pickup, just put Firestone destination AT they are silent and smooth like car tires but have excellent grip etc. I now park in snow banks and do stuff I wouldnt think about with all season tires.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Firestone&tireModel=Destination+A%2FT

If you want a winter tire DO NOT GET MUD TIRES you want the maximum rubber on the road.

TomberLawn
01-25-2010, 10:50 PM
Nice tires, JM.

I'm not looking for a winter tire. Here in NC, people flock to the grocery store for bread and milk when there's a slight chance of flurries. I need a tire that will grip well and provide flotation in off-road conditions. I'm not mud bogging with this truck, but it does need to be able to get out of a little mushy stuff once in a while.

I may go as large as a 305/70/16 tire. This is the same height as a 285/75/16 and has about 1" more width.

By the way, the truck is a 1999 Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins, extended cab, short bed.

360ci
01-25-2010, 11:39 PM
By the way, the truck is a 1999 Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins, extended cab, short bed.

That would definitely put a LOT of weight on the front end. Say about 35% on the rear wheels when empty. I suggest sticking with all terrain tire, as they offer good traction for the rubber surface area, where as mud terrains have less rubber surface area and they're named 'mud' for a reason. A lot of owners with 2wd vehicles in my area think it's OK to put mud terrains on a rwd trucks in the winter, only to find out that a standard all season can out perform in the snow and slush. Getting a mud tire siped would be a better option to at least get better traction overall as an all terrain. Muds have more sidewall bite, but if you go with say, Michelins new AT2 tire, it's a great build and I haven't had any issues with my set on a 2003 Astro cargo van, which has next to no weight in the rear and tire spin is minimal in the snow, and even on wet grass areas. It has some sidewall bite should the tires try to sink, but the tread is still aggressive enough to get you out of low traction situation without slipping. the only downside is the price. Runner up would be the BFG A/T. If you must go with a mud tire on a rwd vehicle, be sure to get it siped. Siping will allow better wear characteristics and allows some flex in the tread to allow better grip.

pitrack
01-25-2010, 11:42 PM
At least put sand bags back there man. A 2 wheel drive pickup with no weight in the bed is almost useless.

TomberLawn
01-25-2010, 11:53 PM
If you must go with a mud tire on a rwd vehicle, be sure to get it siped. Siping will allow better wear characteristics and allows some flex in the tread to allow better grip.

I wrote a short article about siping in a newsletter advertising tire service for the truck shop I work at part-time.

I know A/T's will handle better on the road. I just don't want tires becoming slicks like the tires I have now. One revolution and the tread is packed with mud.

Gravel Rat
01-26-2010, 12:06 AM
I have never had much luck with Firestone tires I found the rubber compound to be very hard.

Your problem is the diesel adds alot of front axle weight the second problem is the power breaks the traction and causes wheel spin.

I have had good sucess with the Toyo M55

www.toyotires.ca/products/M55.asp

TomberLawn
01-26-2010, 10:12 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions. I know more weight would be good, but it's just not feasible to haul an extra couple hundred pounds of lead in my bed. I'll probably throw 265 or 285 on the front next time around too, to help keep the Cummins from sinking in.

I think I've narrowed my choices down a little. At least until I see something else that catches my eye...lol. Each has 18 or 19/32" of tread, which I was thinking wasn't all that deep until I remembered I've been working with big rig tires at work that have 32/32" tread.

Dunlop Maxx Traction M/T
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/BigPic.jsp?sidewall=Blackwall&tireMake=Dunlop&tireModel=Rover+M%2FT+Maxx+Traction&partnum=07QR6ROVMT&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

Kumho KL71
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/BigPic.jsp?sidewall=Blackwall&tireMake=Kumho&tireModel=Road+Venture+MT+KL71&partnum=07QR6KL71&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

And depending on what kind of deal I can find, Goodyear MTR
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/BigPic.jsp?sidewall=Outlined+White+Letters&tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Wrangler+MT%2FR+with+Kevlar&partnum=875QR6WMTRKOWL&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

ruffs
01-27-2010, 12:48 PM
tires atrnt your prop a realy good locker or lsd can be had for the price of a set of tires.
a locker will take you further than tires . If you have one wheel spining you cae put on the e break this will stop the spining tire and equlizing the torque and make bothe wheels turn . diy traction control. In a 4wd just ride the brake

TomberLawn
01-27-2010, 01:37 PM
The truck has a limited slip differential. Both tires are spinning already.

ruffs
01-27-2010, 02:32 PM
sorry missed that

Mickhippy
01-27-2010, 04:49 PM
How about putting wider tires on your trailer. Sounds like there becoming ankers!

From what you've described, I would sell the truck and get a 4wd!

360ci
01-27-2010, 06:08 PM
Kumho KL71
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/BigPic.jsp?sidewall=Blackwall&tireMake=Kumho&tireModel=Road+Venture+MT+KL71&partnum=07QR6KL71&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes

I've had these tires on two previous trucks. They work GREAT. My only negative is that braking distance will be longer, as there's less rubber to road contact when compared to another M/T or of course an A/T

TomberLawn
01-27-2010, 10:55 PM
I've had these tires on two previous trucks. They work GREAT. My only negative is that braking distance will be longer, as there's less rubber to road contact when compared to another M/T or of course an A/T

My friend's dad just put some of these on his truck, a 2006 or so Ram 2500 4x4 Cummins. It's actually the friend whose field I got stuck in. I don't think his dad goes off-road much with his truck, but I'll ask him what he thinks about those Kumhos too.