PDA

View Full Version : This time not adding the Mulch


OrangeToys
01-26-2010, 03:48 PM
Everyone is always talking about add mulch to landscaping but what about have to remove it? When do you do this and how?

Thanks for the input.

Jim Bo
01-26-2010, 04:46 PM
On my properties when I edge I always remove some mulch, the main thing with too much mulch is you don't want it piling up on the plantor the root ball, that's when you start getting plant material dying off. As an example if I have a property that takes 10 yards of mulch I will usally have 2-3 yards of edges and old mulch that gets hauled away. Hope this helps.

Kevin M.
01-26-2010, 05:55 PM
ALL mulch helps the roots of shrubs and trees and will decompose into the soil and only help the trees and shrubs roots. I have mulched thousands and thousands of plants and trees and have never killed one and most of the time the plants thrive when you add mulch to there root balls. I am mesmorized when I here of companies removing mulch from around trees and shrubs. I also think if a client can afford mulch then why not try to upsell them on a plant health care program for there entire landscape. jmo

OrangeToys
01-26-2010, 06:27 PM
ALL mulch helps the roots of shrubs and trees and will decompose into the soil and only help the trees and shrubs roots. I have mulched thousands and thousands of plants and trees and have never killed one and most of the time the plants thrive when you add mulch to there root balls. I am mesmorized when I here of companies removing mulch from around trees and shrubs. I also think if a client can afford mulch then why not try to upsell them on a plant health care program for there entire landscape. jmo

this sound dumb but I didn't know mulch helped, i thought it was really just something to cover dirt and give some more color to the landscaping.


And what are you guys talking about edging?

GreenmanCT
01-26-2010, 06:29 PM
Everyone is always talking about add mulch to landscaping but what about have to remove it? When do you do this and how?

Thanks for the input.

I removed 30 yards of mulch once to replace the areas with turf. I just took a bobcat and dumped it in a 30 yard roll off.....the roll off was a mistake though, next time im just gonna use the trucks at the local materials recycling place, its way cheaper then the roll off.

Kevin M.
01-26-2010, 06:37 PM
Denbow dont be afraid to ask questions here on lawnsite since there are many fantastic landscape owners all over the country and I have gotten some good ideas here. My background is I have an associates in horticulture and the landscape business has been in the family for over 50 years and I am 35 !

phasthound
01-26-2010, 06:47 PM
ALL mulch helps the roots of shrubs and trees and will decompose into the soil and only help the trees and shrubs roots. I have mulched thousands and thousands of plants and trees and have never killed one and most of the time the plants thrive when you add mulch to there root balls. I am mesmorized when I here of companies removing mulch from around trees and shrubs. I also think if a client can afford mulch then why not try to upsell them on a plant health care program for there entire landscape. jmo

Mulching can be of tremendous benefit to woody ornamentals. But like everything else it must be done properly.
http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/mulching.aspx

As for plant health care programs, they are a great way to improve your clients' landscape and your business.

Oh, any organic matter removed from properties should go composting facilities,

Jim Bo
01-26-2010, 07:11 PM
Thank you Barry, that is what I was to trying to point out. Your link explains it very well.

grassman177
01-26-2010, 07:53 PM
i have had to remove mulch b4 where it WAS killing off the plants. it was crappy cypress mulch. here it does not decay very well and forms a mat. if you mulch year after year it jsut builds up and then the roots try to grown in it and end up drying out and it hurts the plant.

it was a hard rake, pitch fork and wheel barrow kind of work and it sucked.

i convinced them to stick with hardwood and it is much better now and does not build up as fast. we actually remove much of the mulch when doing our fall and spring landscape cleanups but it is inadvertant while blowing and raking leaves etc.. it always gets a fresh layer after the cleanup.

if your landscape beds are close to the street or drive, or you can drive on the lawn, you can use your leaf vac to remove the mulch. just be sure not to over do how much your trailer and dump can handle!!

phasthound
01-26-2010, 08:30 PM
Thank you Barry, that is what I was to trying to point out. Your link explains it very well.

You're welcome Jim. I love getting a call from a new prospect who is having tree problems. They start pointing up while I'm looking down. :)

jeffslawnservice
01-28-2010, 04:44 PM
Correct me if I am wrong but I thought mulch helped plants even after it lost its color? It is organic so it should help the plants. Only reason I would remove mulch would be if it had a fungus growing on it or if they wanted turf or something besides mulch.

rob7233
01-28-2010, 06:53 PM
ALL mulch helps the roots of shrubs and trees and will decompose into the soil and only help the trees and shrubs roots. I have mulched thousands and thousands of plants and trees and have never killed one and most of the time the plants thrive when you add mulch to there root balls. I am mesmorized when I here of companies removing mulch from around trees and shrubs. I also think if a client can afford mulch then why not try to upsell them on a plant health care program for there entire landscape. jmo

Well almost, but I don't see any Rock or rubber mulch decomposing in my area or contributing to plant health. However, organic type mulches do generally break down and adds nutrients & organic material to the soil that supports microorganisms that improves soil structure.

Also, it controls water loss by evaporation, suppresses weed seed germination, improves soil surface tension to better allow for absorption, controls soil temperature which can add to plant stress and slows erosion. On top of all that it adds beauty to the landscape.

For all the above reasons I hate rock that's used as mulch for plants. The day it's put in, is the best it will ever look! It sinks, traps organic material within it's spaces, holds water underneath which weed seeds just love and is hard to maintain (to keep out of the grass areas). It doesn't have any plant benefits, it's heavy and it a real PITA to take out years later.

Lastly, it offers no annual renewal income to replace, is a liability when it takes flight and IMHO it's fugly.

Jim Bo
01-28-2010, 07:13 PM
Man you nailed that one on the head !

rob7233
01-28-2010, 09:25 PM
Man you nailed that one on the head !

Thanks, Jim Bo.

Come to think of it, what I kind of did was list some selling points for Mulch to your clients. Oh well, feel free to copy. :drinkup:

glaciator
01-28-2010, 09:33 PM
I agree mulch is great for the soil, is more aesthetic than rock, and has soil temperature and moisture regluating capabilities. I use it when I can. However, here in Colorado we have something called wind. Mix wind with very dry conditions, and that wood mulch can easily end up in Kansas. So, I have to be careful when using wood mulch in certain exposures. When I have to, I like to break up large expanses with a mixture of 2-4" and 5-12" cobble in some areas, then 1 1/2" river rock in others, and then wood mulch in others. That way there isn't a "sea" of 1 1/2" river rock everywhere. I HATE THAT!

Anyway, good question and great link Barry!