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rosarioslawncutters
02-09-2010, 06:36 PM
hi..

i have a 89 extended cab 2wd with 235/75/16 BG GOODRICH TIRES M+S BUT MY TRUCK SUCKS IN THE SNOW..IS ADDING WEIGHT HELPS? IF YES HOW MUCH WEIGHT? THE TRUCK IS A 2500 3/4..I SHOULD OF GOTTEN A 4 WHEEL DRIVE BUT I AM JUST STARTING MY LAWN CARE BIZ AND FOR $400 THAT I PAYED FOR THE TRUCK WHO CAN COMPLAIN...

THANKS

GOD BLESS AMERICA

SchnabelLawnCare
02-09-2010, 07:00 PM
hi..

i have a 89 extended cab 2wd with 235/75/16 BG GOODRICH TIRES M+S BUT MY TRUCK SUCKS IN THE SNOW..IS ADDING WEIGHT HELPS? IF YES HOW MUCH WEIGHT? THE TRUCK IS A 2500 3/4..I SHOULD OF GOTTEN A 4 WHEEL DRIVE BUT I AM JUST STARTING MY LAWN CARE BIZ AND FOR $400 THAT I PAYED FOR THE TRUCK WHO CAN COMPLAIN...

THANKS

GOD BLESS AMERICA

I've added 100lbs to the bed of my Chevy S10. Good tread also helps on the tires.

DoetschOutdoor
02-09-2010, 07:02 PM
The 100lbs or whatever you get from the sandbags or whatever is totally pointless. Just makes for solid frozen 50lb flying missiles in the bed of your truck when you slam on the brakes. You need a lot more weight that what can reasonably be put in there. Just gotta deal with it or dont drive until roads are clear.

OrganicsMaine
02-09-2010, 07:03 PM
If you really want good traction, you should put at least 1k# in that thing, if possible, at or behind the rear wheels

STIHL GUY
02-09-2010, 07:20 PM
yeah load it up. experiment with different amount of weights to see what works best for you

BTM Lawn Maintenance L.L.C
02-09-2010, 07:22 PM
Tire chains ? or snow tires in the rear should help...

OrganicsMaine
02-09-2010, 07:27 PM
Tire chains ? or snow tires in the rear should help...

Still need a lot of weight!:weightlifter:

ProcsLC
02-09-2010, 07:59 PM
Being from NY we know all about snow and 2 wheel drive trucks!

The best advice is go to home depot, buy (12) 70lb sand bags... Then, go to the lumber section and buy 2 8" wide boards to make a box within your truck, if you have a bedliner there will already bee side slots molded into them so you can just cut the boards across and drop them in. Then make a full row of 6 and double stack them over the wheel wells... Make sure your tires are properly inflated (usually 35psi) This will assist you with driving in the snow...

Scagmower48
02-09-2010, 08:45 PM
Its amazing what 200 pounds can do and don't forget to fill up before a snow storm. A full tank weighs alot more than a half tank.

wannabamower
02-09-2010, 09:08 PM
If you don't want to buy sandbags you can use fire wood. I have a 02 ext cab GMC 2wd I start filling it up until it starts to sag. It gets around pretty good.

joslawn33
02-09-2010, 09:40 PM
I got the same tires on a 07 F250 powerstroke 4x4 except their 265s 2 wheel drive sucks bad in snow or mud dont get me wrong the front is heavy but damn its crazy.im putting maxis buckshot mudders on it just for winter keep the goodrich for summer.

Hawg City Lawns
02-10-2010, 12:51 AM
ive got 500 in my half ton right now plus snow weight shes starting to sag

Tinkerer
02-10-2010, 01:46 AM
My 2wd 04 Ranger worked well with Blizzak snow tires and 300 pounds in the back.
My 2wd 93 F150 worked well with BFG All Terrain tires in the back and at least 500 pounds.
My 2wd 94 F250hd gets around o.k. with nearly 1000 pounds in the back. If a big storm is coming along I will shovel more snow in the back and then pack it down. Like mentioned above those "sand in a tube" will soak in moisture through the fabric and turn into a brick. I was delivering auto parts in a company truck, jumped on the brakes and one of them slid ahead and punched open the front wall on the pickups box and made it rub against the back of the cab and squeek. The safest way to add weight is to go and buy a bunch of water softener salt bags and keep the reciept. The bags are flexible. And when winter is over go back to where you bought them and return them or just put them in storage and use again next year. Just check for rips in them so they don't leak salt all over the bed.

Gravel Rat
02-10-2010, 03:27 AM
A good set of siped snow tires and some weight is the only way to go. A mud tire siped helps with traction. If the snow is bad enough then snow chains.