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John Deere Mann
02-13-2010, 10:12 PM
I have been seeing alot of advertisement on rubber mulch. I was just wondering if this a high customer demand and if any one had luck with it.
The one i seen in Total Landscape care is 30lb bag for $ 5.50 comes in 7 colors. Don't know if it would be worth trying?

whosedog
02-13-2010, 11:10 PM
I have been seeing alot of advertisement on rubber mulch. I was just wondering if this a high customer demand and if any one had luck with it.
The one i seen in Total Landscape care is 30lb bag for $ 5.50 comes in 7 colors. Don't know if it would be worth trying?
A lot of parks departments around here use it around playground equipment,probably safer(bouncier)when kids land on it and no splinters or bugs in it.I never see it used on planting beds just playgrounds.

Barefoot James
02-13-2010, 11:27 PM
Hell no - run away fast. This stuff is a nightmare, it blows away (when using blowers) and everytime it rains it goes everywhere and it has ZERO nutritional value to the plants, plus it is VERY expensive - but it is an excellent surface for playgrounds that have a large border to contain it in one place - like rail road ties.

GKchris311
02-14-2010, 01:47 PM
I would never use that junk on my customers landscapes. It's hideous, horrible stuff and I wouldn't want my name on a job that has it. Fine for playgrounds, but use good ole hardwood for anything else.

John Deere Mann
02-14-2010, 03:08 PM
Thanks guy's for the input. Lesson # 1 befor you do anything ask your friends at Lawnsite.com!:):):)

tmc8524
02-14-2010, 04:22 PM
I'm gonna disagree with the run away fast part. If you get the right stuff it is great. Don't buy the cheap junk in bags. Do your research online and ask for samples. I looked into this a yr or 2 ago and found some quality products. They looked like regular hardwood and were just as heavy or heavier. Maybe the other guys have had experience with the smaller playground grade which is made very fine to keep out anything that may injure children. The type designed for beds can be very nice depending on the manufacturer. Don't buy the stuff at Lowe's! As far as nutrition, yes it does keep out organic decaying material, but weeds have a hard time growing in it, it stays bright all yr, and you don't have to replace it every yr. Depending on what you charge for the mulch and installing it, it can equal out. I would keep your options open.

John Deere Mann
02-14-2010, 05:08 PM
The info i saw was in the Total Landscape Care mag. Ever last Mulch WWW.stopmulching.com 30 pound bags $ 5.50

anlo
02-14-2010, 07:57 PM
Hell no - run away fast. This stuff is a nightmare, it blows away (when using blowers) and everytime it rains it goes everywhere and it has ZERO nutritional value to the plants, plus it is VERY expensive - but it is an excellent surface for playgrounds that have a large border to contain it in one place - like rail road ties.

We use it all the time on our playground installations, and its great. It has the highest fall protection rating by far of all the commonly used surfaces. but I would never use rail road ties as the border because it defeats the purpose of fall protection by introducing something as hard as a rock to the play area. We typically use Curbendables (trade name) which are made of recycled tires and are able to bend so you can make nice curves with it. Or we use plastic borders by companies such as Little Tikes.

Rivervalleylawns
02-14-2010, 08:04 PM
The rubber mulch sucks really really bad for anything besides playgrounds. Your better off using the real stuff.

And i disagree about using hardwood. It does not decompose barely at all. Cedar or Cypress is always my top picks. With that we always try to persuade customers to go with the light brown color. Red and dark brown fade really quick compared to the light brown. This is just my opinion with laying about 1000 yards down a year.

Think Green
02-14-2010, 09:55 PM
Rubber mulches are used in well bordered walk ways and around foundational areas of baron landscapes. If aggregate isn't desired, then use the rubber mulch. It needs to be applied thick! It does have undesireable results if leaves are prolific.
The use of rubber mulches is just another attempt of the tree huggers to eliminate the onslought of tree reduction. It is an attempt to eliminate the other resource of oil products though. Someone had an idea of recycling tires,etc. and reentering the market with a mulch like product around the home to cure the inevitable weed problem. As far as nutritional properties, yes there is none to be imagined. The idea is like solarization of soil using plastic. It keeps the area warm and pretty much nothing will grow through the stuff. Nothing beats organic mulch.

Total Grounds Maintenance
02-14-2010, 10:22 PM
Didn't know it had a higher safety rating than regular mulch. Also why would anyone think the stuff is more enviro friendly? Your putting rubber back in the ground? Trees are renewable. I think some towns have a ban on it too.

starscream
02-15-2010, 06:24 PM
They work great around playground equipment, But of my customers that have it, i don't like it, and it doesn't look great. I have removed some from customers that eventually ended up not liking it.

Portland Landscape (http://www.paradiserestored.com/index.htm)

kenneth meals
04-08-2010, 08:02 AM
I was doing research on the rubber mulch and the USDA does not recommend the rubber mulch in planted areas due to the metals from tires which contained zinc, cadnium, lead, arsenic, and nickel. It lists the zinc content as being the number one cause of plant toxification (dead plants). And certainly does not recommend rubber mulch to be for edible plant beds.