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View Full Version : 1/2 Ton Trucks Durability


weed wacker 2
02-15-2010, 05:57 PM
Has anyone had any success towing a mowing trailer over a period of years and not having any major issues with them. Im not talking about pulling a little 12 ft trailer either. I pull a 20 ft trailer and 3 mowers and need a larger trailer. I just don't know if a half ton will last year after year. Any inputs will be greatly appreciated.

The-Other-Side
02-15-2010, 06:18 PM
My only experience was with a dodge with the hemi engine in it. It had enough power to pull at the time our 16' which carried only about 4000lbs in equipment. It would pull some pretty high rpms on hills though. The problem I had with that truck though was the transmission and the rear end (4.10 gearing) crapped out at around 40k miles. The transmission was horrible. It never new what gear to be in and would constantly shift up and down gears.

I didn't dare put our dump trailer behind that truck at the time or any other heavy load. Since the old dodge I have had a gmc 2500 duramax with the allison transmission and have loved it. I would never go back to a 1/2 ton.

weed wacker 2
02-15-2010, 06:32 PM
I currently have a 06 f250 but the ride isn't as smooth as a half ton. I know it would last along time but I just don;t know about the 6.0 diesel.

doubleedge
02-15-2010, 06:48 PM
If you want a smooth ride in a hd truck, get a chevy/gmc; they have independent front suspension. Plus, you wouldn't have to worry about the diesel engine giving you problems.

On the other hand, you will probably lose money if you sell your f250 now, and the 06 diesel was actually one of ford's most reliable engines that year.

360ci
02-15-2010, 07:19 PM
I had a '90 C1500 5.0L V8. Mind you, 1/2 tons aren't built to last anymore. Not to say that you won't get around 150-200K out of one, but don't expect much more towing more than 8K on a regular basis. If you swap out the rear axle cover for one that adds capacity, a larger tranny pan and a transmission oil cooler, it'll last just as good as a 3/4 ton. Depending on the trailer tongue weight, it might sag more, but helper springs can fix that for around $100 or less. besides a diesel option in 2500 series trucks, the only thing different is the frame and suspension. HD is mroe capable, and can allow for more business expansion - plowing for example.

overtime mp
02-15-2010, 10:04 PM
I have towed a 14 foot with weight on it never had a problem this year I have a 16. In a few more year I plan to get a 20 or 18 but I will be getting a 2500hd first. I wouldn't tow what you got with half ton unless its straight
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MikeKle
02-16-2010, 12:49 AM
A few years ago when I was getting my truck serviced, they gave me a loaner truck, it was a 2008 Ford F150, I assumed it had a V8 in it, but it had the 6 cyl, and it actually did pretty well towing a 16 ft tandem axle with 3 WBs on it, pulled it great and didnt have any problems with braking either, but I only used it for a few days. It probably wouldnt last real long towing day after day, and the brakes would probably need to be replaced every 6 months or so!!

If you are only towing an open trailer and only hauling WBs, a half ton is plenty.

beano
02-16-2010, 01:48 AM
I towed a 18ft enclosed trailer with my 1500 4.8 ltr every day for about 3 years. No problems and still tow it when my 2500 is hooked up to my dump or vise versa. Love it and it rides so much nicer than my 200hd. Only compliant was it was searching for gears on the freeway between 64 and 70 mph. Any mph over or under those numbers and it was fine. All together i think i weighed in around 5500lbs. I think i have a pic

beano
02-16-2010, 01:49 AM
http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=256684&page=2

on page two of this thread, the grey truck an trailer

topsites
02-16-2010, 02:10 AM
Transmission.
Brakes.

yardmanlee
02-16-2010, 08:14 AM
I have a 99 dodge 1500 4wd that pulled a 16' trailer for yrs. 90k miles replaced the rear end and at 125k miles replaced clutch, now has 150k plus miles and still a strong truck 5.2L engine using my 1 ton dump to pull the trailer now

WH401
02-16-2010, 08:49 AM
No offense, but it sounds like your just trying to get into a new truck. As much as I despise the 6.0, I'd take it over a 1/2 ton any day, especially for what you plan on towing. As another said, the 06' 6.0 wasn't as problematic as the earlier versions. In the long run it's going be cheaper, and not to mention more logical, to just keep the truck you have.

TXNSLighting
02-16-2010, 10:46 AM
Transmission.
Brakes.

once again, were not in the 70's, 80's or 90's anymore. half tons today are not really half tons. theyve got bigger brakes on them now, with better trannies, and better suspension.

WHIPPLE5.7
02-16-2010, 12:38 PM
If for some crazy reason I was looking to use a 1/2 ton it would without doubt be a Tundra. They have a great transmission, brakes, and power. Having been a long time GM advocate and owner I will say stay away from 1/2 ton GMs, they are just too car like and weak. Don't know enough about Ford and Dodge but I'd keep the Ford 6.0 for now. If it hasn't given problems yet you might be safe. I never thaught I'd even need a dually and now that I do I wish I had 4500/5500 truck. In the case of trucks bigger is better.

MikeTA95
02-16-2010, 01:04 PM
my 06 silverado 1500 5.3L ext. cab Z71 is great for towing my 16' open trailer. It has a tow/haul mode that adjusts the shift points, and when you use that you can't even feel the trailer behind you. I don't have any problems with hills because.. well, here in south jersey its all flat. I would have to say that the brakes aren't very good with the trailer behind it however. I have front discs and rear drums, so with weight behind it I really have to plan my stops way in advance, especially if it's loaded up with something heavy like a few yards of damp mulch. I really love my truck through, plenty of power, very comfortable, and used it was really affordable. I do have to admit, however, I am saving up for a 2011 duramax 2500, because the new frame and engine should be more than enough to handle the extremes I put that truck through.

poolboy
02-16-2010, 05:53 PM
once again, were not in the 70's, 80's or 90's anymore. half tons today are not really half tons. theyve got bigger brakes on them now, with better trannies, and better suspension.

You're correct, for instance- the Tundra....

http://www.4wheeloffroad.com/techarticles/drivetrain/2007_toyota_tundra_rear_axle/index.html

weed wacker 2
02-16-2010, 07:28 PM
I would like a new truck but im not going to get one unless its economical. When I say new truck i mean new to me. I don't ever plan to pull anything over 6-8k. I know a guy that prefers his tundra over his old 04 f250. He pulls a 26ft gooseneck with 2 60in lazers with baggers and alot of grass. He said it doesnt have the take off power as the diesel but of course it has a whole lot more low end torque. I don't do any plowing because I live in Arkansas, so im not concerned with the front end wearing out.

WH401
02-16-2010, 10:03 PM
I would like a new truck but im not going to get one unless its economical. When I say new truck i mean new to me. I don't ever plan to pull anything over 6-8k. I know a guy that prefers his tundra over his old 04 f250. He pulls a 26ft gooseneck with 2 60in lazers with baggers and alot of grass. He said it doesnt have the take off power as the diesel but of course it has a whole lot more low end torque. I don't do any plowing because I live in Arkansas, so im not concerned with the front end wearing out.

I see.

Interesting theory your friend has...

weed wacker 2
02-16-2010, 10:51 PM
I see.

Interesting theory your friend has...

I meant the diesel has low end of torque. My work truck is also my daily driver until I get a whole lot more spray accounts to dedicate a truck just for that.

johnnybravo8802
02-17-2010, 09:08 PM
I have an 03' Dodge 1500 with the 4.8 liter V-8. I have 125,000 miles on it w/o a single gliche. I pull a 16' trailer with a 61" TT and a 72" STT and it does good with that. I used to pull my New Holland TC 30 with a loader and rotary and it didn't even phase it-The whole thing filled up my trailer so much, I had to put the bucket on the tongue of the trailer. The tractor also had about 800-1000 lbs of water in the rear tires(Total weight). It has done an amazing job and I love the Dodge truck. However, my next truck will be a one ton because they are more suited for pulling everyday. When I bought the truck, it was only going to pull one mower, so it has done way more than expected. For pulling like I do, you need at least a 3/4 ton-a 1/2 ton was never made for pulling all the time.

360ci
02-17-2010, 09:32 PM
A lot of people over-spec trucks. This can be an advantage if you decide to grow down the road in a couple years. If you plan to buy used, and sell it for another newer truck and don't tow more than 6K regularly, a half ton will be fine. Today's 1500 series trucks can easily handle everyday use and abuse, and are a lot more economical than a 2500 or heavier truck.

My old Dodge Spirit (2.5L I4 3 speed auto) pulled my old utility trailer with aplomb. It had 380,000miles (625,000kms) on it before the rockers rotted through. Besides needing a new head gasket every 50K miles, it ran like a champ otherwise pulling up to 1500lbs, and carrying two passengers. I even used it to carry firewood to the trailer when I had it parked seasonally; total weight pulled and in the car pushed 3000lbs. It was slow, yes, but at 24mpg average economy (10.2L/100km) throughout it's time with me. Its a shame that I've outgrown that small trailer and upgraded to a '90 C1500, which did a great job during the time I had it. 1500 series trucks can carry up to one ton of payload, and tow upwards of 10K. I wouldn't tow 10+K with a half ton just for suspension and driveability reasons, but for up to 6K, it'll do fine.

MikeKle
02-17-2010, 11:29 PM
I think payload is determined by the trucks weight, if it is a half ton, it can carry up to 1000 lbs in the bed, one ton trucks can carry 2000 lbs, and so on. Ive never had a half ton that can carry one ton of anything in the bed..well, without the back wheels rubbing the fenders anyway!

PROPERTYLAWNSERVICELLC
03-05-2010, 09:28 PM
I have a Dodge Dakota cc V6 auto that has hauled 2500 pounds of pea gravel in the bed ,pulled 11500 pounds ccw and It pulled 7900 pounds from Florida to Mississippi all over Alabama no problems .

360ci
03-06-2010, 10:27 AM
I think payload is determined by the trucks weight, if it is a half ton, it can carry up to 1000 lbs in the bed, one ton trucks can carry 2000 lbs, and so on. Ive never had a half ton that can carry one ton of anything in the bed..well, without the back wheels rubbing the fenders anyway!

The term "half ton" dates back to the days of Al Capone and the Great Recession. When a half-ton did in fact mean 1000lb payload, etc. Times have significantly changed, but the name still holds strong in terms of basic capability, even though a half ton can easily be spec'd to carry close to 2000lb payload these days. You can overload a 'half-ton' easily enough these days with trailer tongue weight, tool boxes, in cab equipment, and even passengers.

As an example, a Honda CR-V which was considered a "light truck" up until the SUV term was established a decade ago could only carry 800lbs. Factor in five 250lb passengers and you'll be overweight by 200lbs before fuel and cargo. It's just like the EPA ratings, it took 30 years to adjust them to modern standards and that was with a lot of public hype so they would do it. Perhaps we should get on about changing the "half-ton" moniker to something more fitting for todays standards. Call a "one ton" a "two and a half ton" because most 1tons can haul up to 5K when properly spec'd with dual wheels.

It just opens up a huge can o'worms that I dont' think anyone really wants to deal with and it would also put off potential buyers into thinking "do I really need a 1ton truck?" when really it's a 1500 series crew cab. Blame federal safety regs for increasing weight and such, which generally increases overall capability.