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View Full Version : When does a truck have too many miles


zabmasonry
02-17-2010, 10:04 AM
I've been looking for a new (used) truck, Either a 94-98 12V cummins or a 199-2003 7.3L Powerstroke. I've been keeping an eye out up here, but I'm really thinking that I might need to travel to find a truck. I've been looking at the used truck from the south and I've noticed that the used trucks for sale down there mostly have well above 150k on the ticker.

In my experience, up here, anything over 150k is pretty dicey.

my question is (especially for you southern folks, is what would you consider more miles then you want to get yourself into?

BZ

All_Toro_4ME
02-17-2010, 10:12 AM
at least 200+. We dont get all the extreme snow and ice which results in city crews salting the streets, which in turn breaks the vehicles down quicker.

MikeKle
02-17-2010, 10:33 AM
Diesels will normally get around 250-300K on them before any real major repairs are needed, if they are taken care of though.

I want to know when full size trucks will start seeing as many miles as semi trucks and why they dont now? Semis will get a million miles on them easy, but a full size diesel will only get 300K? What is it that makes them so different? I guess more parts are "repairable" on semis?

MarcSmith
02-17-2010, 10:55 AM
also have to consider while the truck and trans may last that long, will the fit finish, interior radio, HVAC, ect last that long...

mowisme
02-17-2010, 11:25 AM
Mike- Just my 2 cents- The Semi's accumilate majority of those miles on long interstate driving. Just think how many times a full size work truck gets turned on/off in 100,000 miles verses a semi. As you know start-up is the hardest on engine until oil pressure gets up. Also the Idleling alot more at lights (lower oil pressure) is proubly a factor..And interstate driving would be running a cooler engine than say 20mph in town between stop lights..ect. I'm sure their are internal mechanical reasons That I wouldn't know..but just few things come to mind. Geno

MarcSmith
02-17-2010, 11:31 AM
but how often do you go to truck stop and see semis idling over night or for 7-8 hours while they sleep...

Moto52
02-17-2010, 12:28 PM
Mike- Just my 2 cents- The Semi's accumilate majority of those miles on long interstate driving. Just think how many times a full size work truck gets turned on/off in 100,000 miles verses a semi. As you know start-up is the hardest on engine until oil pressure gets up. Also the Idleling alot more at lights (lower oil pressure) is proubly a factor..And interstate driving would be running a cooler engine than say 20mph in town between stop lights..ect. I'm sure their are internal mechanical reasons That I wouldn't know..but just few things come to mind. Geno


You are right on with that, I know a guy who runs a fleet of currier cargo vans with the 7.3 powerstroke and they are run around the clock on shifts rarely even turn the motors off and they have some with 1.2 million kms which is around 750miles i think and there original motors. and i've heard of guys blowing up motors with low miles i'm not saying they all can go that long but definately saying cold starts everyday on any engine takes it toll on it.

Moto52
02-17-2010, 12:32 PM
but how often do you go to truck stop and see semis idling over night or for 7-8 hours while they sleep...

idling isn't bad if you put it on high idle.

DoetschOutdoor
02-17-2010, 12:37 PM
Umm yea, the motor is good for a million miles but what does that matter when you have a truck full of parts that need replacing? I know several people that have diesels, cummins included, that yea the motor is solid but when your front end falls apart, interior getting beat from working 150k hard miles, truck all scratched up, lights stop working, that can all add up to just as much as a major repair. Ive been looking at the cummins with over 100k and alot of them are beat and are going to need $1K+ repairs in the near future. Diesel dont do ya much good when the rest of the truck is falling apart.

Moto52
02-17-2010, 12:56 PM
Umm yea, the motor is good for a million miles but what does that matter when you have a truck full of parts that need replacing? I know several people that have diesels, cummins included, that yea the motor is solid but when your front end falls apart, interior getting beat from working 150k hard miles, truck all scratched up, lights stop working, that can all add up to just as much as a major repair. Ive been looking at the cummins with over 100k and alot of them are beat and are going to need $1K+ repairs in the near future. Diesel dont do ya much good when the rest of the truck is falling apart.

well obviously you want to take good care of your truck if you want it to last long but spending 1k+ every 100k miles i think it about the normal with any truck.. i take care of my truck but it doesn't get babied either lots of heavy towing and even not towing i like to smash the pedal to the floor alot. if you are talking about a bush truck yea sure there not going to last long. I've got over 200k on my truck and it would never look like it has that many miles on it, still looks new and interior looks new to..
here is a pic of my truck to show you just cause it has high miles doesn't mean there all wrecked, and i plan on keeping this truck forever and hope to put a million kms on it one day.
http://i47.tinypic.com/2bptdt.jpg

Mowingman
02-17-2010, 01:01 PM
The 7.3 is a half million mile engine, if it is properly cared for. I have owned 14 Fords with the 7.3 Powerstroke engine in them. Ever one I purchased ,had over 225,000 miles on them when I bought them. Many, I later sold to friends, and they are up around 375,000 miles now, with no major engine problems.
As long as you stick with the 7.3, anything under probably 350,000 miles is not too many, if you can verify that regular maint. has been done on it.
Be aware that the lousy 6.0 came out in 2003 model year.

360ci
02-17-2010, 10:37 PM
Any high mileage vehicle at a good price that interests me, better have previous maintenance records or I'll walk away. Gas, diesel, doesn't matter what it is. Cummins engines can easily go 500K+. TBO is 100K higher than V8 diesels. Not to say it'll outlast, but there is a higher chance that it will due to the inline design. V8's for me are meant to be gas.

Semi's use high idle to put a 'load' on the engine so it reduces stress and creates heat at the expense of a gallon of fuel an hour to keep that engine running around 1000rpm. Idle in my old Freightliner was ~600rpm, I could adjust the fast idle from 700-1250rpm.

extremerc76
02-18-2010, 02:19 AM
also realize that a semi puts those million miles on in 10 years, where it would take an average person about 6 years to hit 100k. that means that your truck is exposed to alot more age (rust, rot, ect) also breaks a truck down, compared to the semi before it would even come close to the same milage.

GravelyNut
02-19-2010, 07:16 PM
Any high mileage vehicle at a good price that interests me, better have previous maintenance records or I'll walk away. Gas, diesel, doesn't matter what it is. Cummins engines can easily go 500K+. TBO is 100K higher than V8 diesels. Not to say it'll outlast, but there is a higher chance that it will due to the inline design. V8's for me are meant to be gas.

Semi's use high idle to put a 'load' on the engine so it reduces stress and creates heat at the expense of a gallon of fuel an hour to keep that engine running around 1000rpm. Idle in my old Freightliner was ~600rpm, I could adjust the fast idle from 700-1250rpm.
Tell Detroit Diesel that Diesels aren't meant to be V-8s. 8V71 and 8V92 ring a bell? The difference in longevity is built into a semi's engine while isn't on a pickups. And if you look at bigger Diesels, a million miles isn't anywhere near the max they can go.

PS : There are Chevy/GM pickups out there still running that have reached the million mile mark. On the original engine.

mike lane lawn care
02-19-2010, 09:40 PM
it's all relative to the price of the vehicle. I came across a truck when I was down in SC on a trip, that had 275k on it, with no rust and the guy was asking $1000 for it, if I could have driven two vehicles home, I would have. but had the asking price been $4000, I would have said "it's nice, but now for that money"

janb
03-01-2010, 03:59 AM
Try to buy under 150k, and if cared for will go at least 300k (diesel, preferably Cummins). I got 300k on a gasser Dodge for only the expense of a $19 timing chain. It was running great when I sold it.

I find Dallas, TX a great market for used trucks (no rust)

I buy, 1 owner, By owner, with records. They can go a long way. Be sure it has had some front end and suspension repairs, if not that can be spendy. (Common problem with 2nd Gen Dodge.) Trannies are also an issue. (both auto and manual) I would like to buy one that has been recently rebuilt, and service it every year (if towing heavy). I tow ~30,000 GCVW in my 1Gen (93) 12v Dodge. Very steep mtn area. I expect it to go at least 300k, I bought at 140k for $4000 (1T dually 4x4 flatbed).

I drove a '62 Studebaker Diesel Truck during college that had 3 million miles. (I did a daily 800 mile rte)
I have 300k on my VW pickup, still gets 46 mpg. I recently tried out a VW Passat diesel w/ 550k, it still was getting 50 mpg.

zz4guy
03-01-2010, 03:49 PM
My truck has 250,000+. Original engine and tranny. No smoke, clean oil, good power. I got it for a steal so it's worth it for me to keep it forever.

If you can find a cheap vehicle that runs well and is easy to work on that is probably your best bet.