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View Full Version : Spikes - Galvanized or Common?


DVS Hardscaper
02-17-2010, 10:26 PM
Seems to be some varying opinions on which type of spikes (for anchoring paver restraint) are better.

Cast your vote today!

greatinmulchbeds
02-17-2010, 10:32 PM
common for sure, they need to rust and stick into the base better

Rocha_Construction
02-18-2010, 09:46 AM
Really? I though that if they rust, the could be a hazard for barefoot home owners.

Besides, if they rot too much, they might end up snapping. (although I am sure that would take more than years....)

DVS Hardscaper
02-18-2010, 11:55 AM
Ta each his own :)

But I'm gonna say this and I'm only gonna say this once:


This April will mark our 14th year as a full fledged paver installation company. Not our 3rd year workin in a patio here and there between mowing yard, not our 5th year - but our 14th year :)

Since day one. We have used galvanized spikes. And to this day - to my knowledge, there have not been any issues arrising from a galvanized spike not staying put in the ground. Infact, on jobs where we have had to make repairs - we have had trouble pulling the galvanized spikes out of the restraint!

I was at a paver seminar recently where for the 1st time the speaker advocated common spikes :( Could this be his attempt to offset an installer's costs due to his pricey pavers??



,

amscapes03
02-18-2010, 04:14 PM
Guess it depends on the region you live in, and the freeze/thaw cycle you have to deal with. I'm in New England and have seen galvees back-out. Personally, i use both. The jobs (not mine) where i have seen galvees back-out are always on a poorly compacted base. Congrats DVS on 14 years, i'm starting my 14th year as well, note sure of the exact date.

zedosix
02-18-2010, 05:46 PM
Dvs, I bet you 100 bucks you will tell us again.

wurkn with amish
02-18-2010, 06:48 PM
I wont bet ya Zedo! He tells us once a week anyway.


I use galvanized myself and I'm a rootn' toottn' hardscapin' fool.

LB1234
02-18-2010, 09:29 PM
Ta each his own :)

I was at a paver seminar recently where for the 1st time the speaker advocated common spikes :( Could this be his attempt to offset an installer's costs due to his pricey pavers??

,


I'm curious why you bother going to these things since you know so much?

Moneypit
02-18-2010, 10:45 PM
I have $200 that says he tells us more about his wording in contracts first.

DVS Hardscaper
02-18-2010, 11:22 PM
I have $200 that says he tells us more about his wording in contracts first.

Oh! Ok! Ta Hell with the important issues, like contracts, labor laws, contract law, you know - the mechanics to operating business. I'll get busy tomorrow and I'll jus stick to postin pictures of paver jobs, skid loaders, and trucks. Cause ya know - trucks in my state look way different than trucks in NY. The cool thing is you can then save the truck pictures and copy them into your contracts. This way your potential client will see that you truely are a pro. :weightlifter:

PlatinumLandCon
02-20-2010, 12:48 AM
This April will mark our 14th year as a full fledged paver installation company. Not our 3rd year workin in a patio here and there between mowing yard, not our 5th year - but our 14th year :)


There must be some sort of medal for that.....:hammerhead:

Hokie84
02-24-2010, 08:57 PM
I had used galvanized, until I heard the same speaker a year ago. I started using common this past year.

Has anyone been using common for a long time with no problems?

zedosix
02-24-2010, 09:07 PM
I had used galvanized, until I heard the same speaker a year ago. I started using common this past year.

Has anyone been using common for a long time with no problems?

Common nails have risen to 65 dollars a box, galvanized are even more. I use common mostly.

DVS Hardscaper
02-24-2010, 10:10 PM
Ya know, (and I do not mean any disrespect to anyone) I honestly do not think anyone here (including myself) has been in the paver business long enough to know how well common spikes hold up.

Sure they're going to rust and sure they're going to completely deteriorate. But it's going to take what, at least 10 years?? And even after they've disintegrated - it's not like there will suddenly be any evidence to the point where the client is calling you to report a problem.

What will hold the restraint fast if the spike has faded to nothing? Why use spikes at all?

With all due respect, it's my opinion that there is no way anyone here can honestly say "we've only used common steel spikes and we've never had any problems".

If you use cheap gasoline in your truck - the only way you will know the definitive effects of using cheap gasoline is to pull the intake manifold off the block and look at it's ports. If you don't pull the intake - you will NEVER know what cheap gasoline does to an engine.

Same goes for spikes. Unless you do some digging - you have NO clue whats happening with them.

One gentleman mentioned he has had spikes heave during deep freezes. Ok, fair enough, I can buy that. But can't you use longer spikes? The climate here hasn't had any bearing on our spikes (as far as I'm aware).

We'll stick with galvanized. I hate callbacks :)


,


,

Paverman
02-25-2010, 04:56 PM
lots of guys out there with nice brand new shiny trucks, skid steers, backhoes and other equipment. I don't see that as any qualification for quality of work, well, unless you are a tuck salesman and not a landscape/hardscape contractor. Maybe it makes you look like a pro, does not mean that you are.

Paverman
02-25-2010, 05:05 PM
by the way, Edge restraint companies I have heard from all say common spikes, they say the rust binding with the base keeps the spikes in place. I am not so sure about this because those same manufacturers are now making plastic spikes as well. I am not sure how they are supposed to work if you need rust to bind the nails to the base. The only advantage I see with them is that they do not corrode. According to that line of logic, Galvanized would be better than common. (longer life due to lesser corrosion) Cost wise I would go with the common, the lawn/mulch/stone should be covering the tops of the nails anyway so customer stepping on rusty nails should not be an issue and it should be 20-30 years for those nails fail due to rust. The homeowner would want that job replaced anyway in that time due to newer trends. If it aint broke, dont fix it