PDA

View Full Version : plug aeration


JCLawn and more
02-23-2010, 08:23 AM
I am learning more about this, what do you guys do with the plugs? Is the results very noticeable?

Richard Martin
02-23-2010, 08:57 AM
I leave mine behind on the lawn. You will not see an immediate improvement. It sometimes takes years but aeration should be a part of every lawn maintenance program.

markahurley
02-23-2010, 09:04 AM
I am learning more about this, what do you guys do with the plugs? Is the results very noticeable?

i collect each one and number them so i can put them back where they belong in the fall.

FourTrees
02-23-2010, 12:16 PM
i collect each one and number them so i can put them back where they belong in the fall.

Thank you for that laugh, before I head out today to do some aeration!:laugh::clapping:

CrazyBlonde
02-23-2010, 12:46 PM
Plant roots need air in the soil and good drainage. In their absence, root systems will be shallow and weak. In lawns, signs of compacted soil include poor drainage (puddles), excessive weeds despite the use of good weed controls and poor grass growth despite good maintenance practices.

When the soil is compacted, nutrients and water are slow to get to the roots, further weakening the plants. Soil compaction is a problem in high traffic areas or where heavy equipment has been used for construction, grading or even mowing.

An effective tool should produce holes at least three quarters of an inch in diameter and penetrate three inches deep. Also, the plugs should be no more than three inches apart, approx. 20-40 holes in every square foot. The holes allow for air, rain and nutrients to penetrate the soil better. It also gives the roots room to grow and encourages growth of beneficial soil microorganisms. This stimulates root growth and prevents thatch build-up.

Because aerating creates quite a few openings in the lawn, it is best done from late-August to mid-September, when lawns are less susceptible to weeds and the ground is moist without being drenched. If itís late fall, make sure to do it early enough that the turf has at least 30 days to recover before the soil freezes and winter sets in.

You can also aerate in spring when the ground is cool but not waterlogged. The idea is to allow your lawn to heal from this process. Aerating in the middle of a hot summer is not advised.

The lawn will look rough for a few weeks. Leave the cores on the surface to dissolve over the next few weeks. The soil in the cores contains millions of microorganisms that help digest thatch naturally, creating a healthier lawn.

If we have a long dry period after core aerating, run the sprinkler to help break down the cores. Another way to help disolve them faster is to run the mower over them, (Sharpen your blades when done). Avoid using aerators that are simply rollers with spikes. They just push soil aside, adding to the compaction problem.

The down side of core aeration is that it also brings up quite a few weed seeds from the soil bank. You may want to consider using a pre emergent weed control in the spring to minimize the weed problem.

Jason Rose
02-23-2010, 12:53 PM
Agree with what she said ^^

I love the people on here, and there are some, that argue that core aeration does nothing for thatch. Sorry, but t does, matter of fact it does MORE for combatting thatch than any power-rake "dethatcher" could ever do. Customers are also tough to convince of this that are "old school" and think that power rake is the best thing next to sliced bread.

Pull the plugs with the machine and let them break down. If you or the customer dosn't want them laying there, which IS a problem with clay soils, the mud you track around, espically if hey have pets, is a big deal. Let the plugs dry out after you aerate and come back and run over the lawn with a slicer. that will break up the plugs and also the slicer will help cut into the thatch and help water and air to penetrate it.

I avoid power raking as much as possible. Just don't believe in it.

vharman4
02-23-2010, 04:09 PM
aerating sucks

IN2MOWN
02-23-2010, 04:16 PM
aerating sucks



I agree but its a great money maker.

AI Inc
02-23-2010, 04:19 PM
I agree but its a great money maker.

Even better when ya sell em overseeding with it.

IN2MOWN
02-23-2010, 04:23 PM
Even better when ya sell em overseeding with it.

I dont do overseeding with aeration. I want the seed into the ground and with aerating more of the seed will be sitting on top of the lawn then in the soil.

When I overseed I always verticut one direction put the seed down, verticut another direction and then more seed.

AI Inc
02-23-2010, 04:24 PM
I parked my slice seeder yrs ago. Hate the damn thing. Aerate , overseed and fert. Get great results.

topsites
02-23-2010, 05:30 PM
The proper terminology would be "core aeration."

JCLawn and more
02-23-2010, 07:12 PM
The proper terminology would be "core aeration."

Whatever mister political correctness, your pulling a plug out of the ground. I was looking at he 60inch model on here http://www.wikco.com/AeratorWK.html. What did the guy mean by a slicer?

IN2MOWN
02-23-2010, 07:37 PM
Whatever mister political correctness, your pulling a plug out of the ground. I was looking at he 60inch model on here http://www.wikco.com/AeratorWK.html. What did the guy mean by a slicer?




A slicer is what I call a verticutter or slit seeder.



http://www.treetop-nursery.com/Images/Verticutter2.jpg

JCLawn and more
02-23-2010, 07:39 PM
ok, I wondered that. Those buggers are so expensive

IN2MOWN
02-23-2010, 07:44 PM
ok, I wondered that. Those buggers are so expensive

A good place to buy one inexpensively is from a Home Depot rental department. They are kept up pretty good. I saw a bunch of them for sale a few years back for anywhere between $500.00 and $700.00.

JCLawn and more
02-23-2010, 07:46 PM
except I don't have a need for it yet. Not where I am at, so that is still expensive.

IN2MOWN
02-23-2010, 07:51 PM
except I don't have a need for it yet. Not where I am at, so that is still expensive.

I only have one but I also re-seed 30-40 yards every late summer and fall. Probably do double that in aerating though.

Do you not do any re-seedings or lawn renovations? Its a pretty good add on for a lawn service.

RobE
02-23-2010, 08:06 PM
whens the best time to do this, spring or fall?

IN2MOWN
02-23-2010, 08:12 PM
whens the best time to do this, spring or fall?

I usually aerate in the spring or fall and I verticutt and overseed in the late late summer and early to mid fall.

JCLawn and more
02-23-2010, 10:28 PM
this is going to be my second year with my own mower. lol! I should have about 25 lawns this year, most of my lawns are over a acre though. I learning a lot. If I do something, it will be in an another year or so. I only have like 2 that may even be interested in anything like this.

Exact Rototilling
02-24-2010, 03:56 PM
...snip....plugs should be no more than three inches apart, approx. 20-40 holes in every square foot. ....snip.....

1st .... Congrats on the Most eye catching ad on Lawnsite Thumbs Up

20 - 40 plugs..... 5/8" to 3/4" in diameter pulled in a square foot is a shockingly high amount of plugs for just a square foot. Aeration I have seen in my area barely attain that in square yard with a single pass. 3 passes maybe more would be required with most aerators to even come close to this. It has been tough enough trying to convince people than more plugs is better. Most just think an aeration is an aeration don't bother me with the facts. Why can't you price match the neighbor kid with the rental machine?

Even my Plugr 850HD at right at 9-11 plugs per square foot would require more than 2 passes.

I even market my aeration as more plugs per square foot than most others and when I'm done with a clients lawn that is next to a competitor there is most always dramatic difference in the amount of visible plugs unless somebody has done a double pass.

The benefits of lawn aeration is generally not understood well.

This year I'm throwing in a Free fall aeration for all my new mowing clients. A minimum number of mowings is required to get this. If they don't care about a free aeration then I probably don't want them as a customer anyhow.

CrazyBlonde
02-24-2010, 04:50 PM
I agree 40 would be ALOT! 2 passes is what we usually do, that gets us 20 to 22 on average. I was just posting an acceptable RANGE that most of the equipment companies discussed when I spoke with them. In researching, I found that RANGE quite frequently. It really depends on the need. With 144 square inches in a foot, that range is every 3 inches or less; which so many Equipment companies seem to recommend. But like I said, most of us are probably getting about 20 which ALWAYS seems to be plenty. If you were to do the maximum of 3" between each hole in EVERY direction that comes out to 16 to 20 in every square foot, and 20 to 22 has ALWAYS been sufficient for us.
Thanks! about our Fulvic Bloom ad! We thought you guys might like it! Needed to get everyone's attention!

For those of you who haven't "NOTICED" the ad yet, it is on the LEFT side of the page, in the ads under "SPONSORS". It shows up about every 5th time you CHANGE PAGES or REFRESH the page. It has a tote of Fert that says FULVIC BLOOM, and a really HOT CHICK! (if you watch it long enough)

vharman4
02-26-2010, 04:21 PM
do you guys think it is worth the while to get into overseeding?

JCLawn and more
03-01-2010, 07:32 PM
ok, what is the difference for $1,000 in these plug aeratorshttp://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ64rjh/R-100662570/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053 and http://www.husqvarna.com/us/landscape-and-groundcare/products/aerators/ta48/#specifications The cheaper one looks like its a little better. 3/4 inch cores instead on 1/2 inch cores. Whats the deal here?

Richard Martin
03-01-2010, 08:11 PM
ok, what is the difference for $1,000 in these plug aeratorshttp://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1vZ64rjh/R-100662570/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053 and http://www.husqvarna.com/us/landscape-and-groundcare/products/aerators/ta48/#specifications The cheaper one looks like its a little better. 3/4 inch cores instead on 1/2 inch cores. Whats the deal here?

I'm buying the BlueBird this year. The Husky aerator is a actually a BlueBird TA12. The difference is the Husky is a significantly heavier duty aerator than the Home Depot aerator. Without weights it weighs 222 pounds. The Home Depot aerator isn't even close. You can get the BlueBird from Alamia for $1195 shipped. http://www.alamia.us/ProductDetails.asp?ProductCode=BLU%2DTA%2D12&e=Y

JCLawn and more
03-01-2010, 08:15 PM
but, I don't have that much to throw around on this. Would it get the got done? Were only talking like 5 yards for me.

Richard Martin
03-01-2010, 08:22 PM
I have a little correction here...

The Husky unit is actually about 30 pounds lighter than the BlueBird unit so apparently Husky had BlueBird cheapen something up on the Husky model. BlueBird has been owned by Husky for a while now.

Richard Martin
03-01-2010, 08:24 PM
but, I don't have that much to throw around on this. Would it get the got done? Were only talking like 5 yards for me.

Sure. I have one of those lightweight aerators and I've done a whole lot of work with mine. You just have to be a little more careful with it than you would with the BlueBird.

JCLawn and more
03-01-2010, 08:27 PM
are they just as effective? I would rather pay $200 than $1,200. I saw a 60inch model for that. I would not mine that.

Richard Martin
03-01-2010, 08:44 PM
but, I don't have that much to throw around on this. Would it get the got done? Were only talking like 5 yards for me.

Sure. I have one of those lightweight aerators and I've done a whole lot of work with mine. You just have to be a little more careful with it than you would with the BlueBird.

Jason Rose
03-01-2010, 08:44 PM
I had one of those cheaper pull behind years ago... Mine was an agri-fab I believe, which is pretty much just like the one from home depot. Didn't pull plugs for crap. Tine design means a lot. Also the density of the plugs on those cheapo ones is only a few per sq. ft. You can go over it a few times I suppose but it's just not the same. Maybe that's just how the tow behinds all are?

JCLawn and more
03-01-2010, 08:57 PM
I may get it and try it. Then go from there if it takes off. I would rather have a 60inch one.

Az Gardener
06-28-2010, 01:33 PM
Does anyone have any time guidelines? How long to aerate 1-K sq ft? I can't figure out what is taking my guys so long. I have good guys that have been with me a while and they are proficient in every other task but they spent 10 man hours on a 22-K sq ft lawn and didn't even finish ;) Now granted we have to flag sprinkler heads but and cover the ground twice with the blue bird to get minimum 10-12 holes per sq. ft. but to my recollection when I did the work 20 years ago it seemed to go pretty fast.

Another question, does anyone clean their equipment between jobs to keep from carrying unwanted pests from one property to another? We have pearl scale out here, a nasty little bugger that is almost impossible to kill so we thoroughly clean and do a 50/50 bleach spray between each job. Kills us on the small jobs because you spend as much time cleaning as you do aerating.

Az Gardener
06-28-2010, 09:55 PM
bump for a little help

JCLawn and more
06-28-2010, 10:50 PM
you should start a tread for this question. this is a old thread, so people are no doubt ignoring it.