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Slcareco
03-04-2010, 09:31 PM
Say you do a design and the client wants to pick there own contractor do I screen them and charge them a finders fee? or

Say one part of the install I dont do say lighting or irrrigation or pool work is it common to have them sign an agreement to pay me a finder fee %??

Armadillolawncare
03-12-2010, 09:10 PM
Aren't you charging for the design work? Why would you get a finders fee if the customer has their own contractor? You did nothing to find the contractor. Make some contacts in the contractor community and trade referrals.

SuperiorService.110mb.com
03-12-2010, 09:14 PM
Don't just hand them your design for free. If they want it tell thems its $100.00 and that will be creadited to the final bill if they use your services.

White Gardens
03-12-2010, 11:22 PM
Don't just hand them your design for free. If they want it tell thems its $100.00 and that will be creadited to the final bill if they use your services.

Exactly, then tell your customer you will refund the design if they use you for the job.

This way you use a little leverage in order to get the job.

You need to disregard the idea of a finders fee and step up and be a contractor. Make sure you are licensed for your state, and then higher the companies to do the work you don't do.

AGLA
03-13-2010, 08:06 AM
Finder's fee? How hard is it to "find" a contractor in this economy?

There are proper ways of doing this and not so proper ways. No matter what, it starts with doing something of value so that it is gladly paid for. "Finding" a contractor on its own is not of much value. Selecting qualified contractors, negotiating a good price, doing inspections and approvals (rejections and getting things resolved as well), material verification, quality control, coordination between subs, and taking full responsibility of the whole job is the most valued by your client and what pays the best. Not everyone can do that and not every customer is willing to pay for it. This is where you hear of 10-20% fees being charged, but so many people think it is just for giving someone a contractors name. The proper term for it is "contract administration", but most people refer to it as "project management" (bad term because it is used for all kinds of different things).

It is not easy to get that kind of work, but the more you do it, the easier it gets because you get a core group of subs that know how to work with you and each other. There are less conflicts, less quality control issues, .. which all adds up to less actual management by you. That is a good thing, but it makes it a hard thing to get started in because, as it should be obvious, the guys who already have these core groups of subs and a built up reputation are much more desirable to the client than someone just trying to put this together. That is why it is a tough market to break into.