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tricer
06-13-2002, 10:11 AM
I know that this is flame bait but there are several local places that offer sprinkler system design. They then turn around and sell the materials you would need for the installation. My question for this board is, what do you think of these co's, and why would you recommend your (professional) services over this type of service?

And, something that I have heard that I haven't seen around here is sprinkler line pulling. The only options that I have seen around here are trenching. Would you recommend pulling instead? More specifically, what is pulling, and is this something that I should shop around for.

HBFOXJr
06-13-2002, 09:11 PM
Tell us how you fit into this picture.

tricer
06-14-2002, 09:37 AM
I would fit in by either doing it myself or hiring someone to do the installation. The places around here are saying that the installation is reletively easy.

Last night I recieved an irrigation plan (free) from leuter's hardware, along with a detailed quote for all the materials. What I am asking you guys is what a professional offers over and above the installation? The cost is an order of magnitude higher than the do it yourself project. And I wanted to know if I was making a mistake at doing this myself.

SprinklerGuy
06-14-2002, 10:08 AM
Over the last 12 years or so in ARizona, I have come across many many do it yourselfers. How do I come across them if I am a professional irrigation installer you ask? To finish the job because it drags on and on and on and the DIY's get tired of having torn up yards -or- To fix the job because HOME DEPOT (or other) Big Box store designed the system based on a 2 dimensional drawing that was provided to them on a napkin. These 2 dimensional drawings look very PRETTY. But......they have not taken into account some very important details.....


My advice to you is this: Pay someone to do it. The charges may not be much higher than your total cost to do it yourself. The professional gets parts about 50% cheaper than you and DOES IRRIGATION FOR A LIVING.

If you enjoy the outdoors and like manual labor and like frustration, do it yourself. But if you just want to enjoy the outdoors, hire someone to do it for you and with the time you saved you can sit on your deck and enjoy what he did for you.

Just my opinion.

tricer
06-14-2002, 10:35 AM
The important details that may be left out of the design are what concerns me. My wife is an civil engineer and provided a site survey of the house/yard to the guy at leuters accurate to within 3 inches (I believe).

Mentioning that the drawing is 2 dimensional is a good start, but what things specifically is a professional sprinkler installer going to do that the guy from leuters and myself wouldn't accomplish?

Speaking from my perspective, I can say that the labor and/or time factor isn't really a concern of mine. I am remodelling our current house and I am able to manage time and money efficiently. My goal here is to save money and do it right, not save money and do it wrong. If there is something that I am not taking into account, please let me know so I can avoid doing it wrong.

HBFOXJr
06-14-2002, 11:55 AM
OK, your a DIY homeowner. A good contractor can offer all of the little intangibles that are too numerous and varied to cover here. Despite your wife being an engineer and you being mechanically capable or maybe talented professional knowledge and experience have a big edge. You can do he job. Go to Hunter Industries (http://www.hunterindustries.com) and down load their residential sprinkler design manual. It is an excellent beginning tool. Do not allow a local salesperson to say you need or don't need something contrary to the Hunter manual before consulting with us here.

SprinklerGuy
06-14-2002, 03:07 PM
I guess a professional sprinkler installer has NOTHING to offer a competent DIYer like yourself. And with the help of an engineer you should be just fine. Good luck to you! Toot toot!


Just one advantage though to using a contractor.......PEACE OF MIND.

also.............
I am also highly capable and I can do almost everything on my own at home. That being said, I make a lot more money doing my job than I would save doing it myself. Therefore I let the professionals do what they do best. I continue to do what I do best and in my free time, instead of working on some task at home, I relax and enjoy my family.

DanaMac
06-14-2002, 07:21 PM
I am also highly capable and I can do almost everything on my own at home. That being said, I make a lot more money doing my job than I would save doing it myself. Therefore I let the professionals do what they do best. I continue to do what I do best and in my free time, instead of working on some task at home, I relax and enjoy my family.

Well said. Also with my vehicles. I don't even change my oil.

Some things we may offer over you putting it in:

Professional grade parts. Not the stuff you get at the big box stores.
Warranty on parts AND labor. If you screw it up or coverage is bad, who are you going to call? The store who sold you the parts will probably laugh.
Having it done in a timely manner. Not over 3 weekends or many after work sessions.
You won't have the tools ledt over that you will probably never use again. Poly cutters, PVC saw, clamp crimpers, soldering torch, solder, flux paste, etc.
Have you figured in the cost of these tools?
How about cost of trencher or pipe puller? Do you have a truck to tow it?
Oh no! I'm a few clamps short. Another trip to HB.
How do I adjust these damn heads?
How does this timer work? Why won't #4 come on? Why won't #3 shut off?
What is with this water hammer? I did not know about putting it in after the regulator.
This solder joint won't stop leaking.
Teflon tape?? What's that?
Next Spring: Why is this big crack in the backflow preventer and copper pipe? I had to drain it? How do I do that? Why? Doesn't it drain through the heads?
Do you realize you are supposed to get a permit through your regional building dept?

I'll come up with more if needed.