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TLS
06-14-2002, 12:12 AM
Have LOT's of the above in my treated lawns. My spray guy is at wits end as to what to do about it (other than Round-UP!). I want to help him out by suggesting a treatment. Seems as the Strawberry is new this season all of a sudden. He just sprayed on 5-31-02 and it rained heavy about 8 hours later. Most of them were OK (ones that weren't that weedy) but the "problem" lawns look as if nothing was sprayed.

He sprayed Momentum with a liquid fert w/iron and a sticker.

Any Ideas?

Evan528
06-14-2002, 12:32 AM
I would use confront for the above mentioned weeds. Momentum has confront and 2,4d in it so its a great product...... but straight confront is the best for those hard to kill weeds. Confront is slow to work...but the end results are much better.

Green Sweep
06-14-2002, 07:57 AM
Try 'Millennium Ultra' made by Riverdale.

MOW ED
06-14-2002, 08:11 AM
I'm with Green Sweep
Millennium Ultra works for me.

TLS
06-14-2002, 08:11 AM
Thanks guys!

Do you think that the heavy rain was the BIG factor here, or the chemical used?

I'm thinking it was a combo, with a little bit of "not enough product" in the actual mix. :rolleyes:

Kent Lawns
06-14-2002, 10:35 AM
Without giving my chemistry lesson:

Momentum/Millenium/Confront share common active ingredients.

Confront has the only the good stuff.

tremor
06-14-2002, 09:34 PM
Confront is Clopyralid & Triclopyr

Momentum is 2,4-D, Clopyralid & Triclopyr.

Millenium is 2,4-D, Dicamba, & Triclopyr.


By themselves, clopyralid & trichlopyr are very slow yet extremely effective herbicides. Clopyralid is especially effective at controlling vining weeds that would otherwise be harder to control. It's also fairly expensive.

Momentum & Millenium both contain 2,4-D to speed them up to a "homeowner realistic speed expectation" & they're both less expensive since 2,4-D is very cheap.

Any of these, when applied properly, should do a good job for you. Though the more trichlopyr & clopyralid, the better the control.

Weeds are doing so very well now because (in this area anyway) last fall was very condusive to the establishment of weeds. Rain doesn't hurt the weeds either. Neither did the mild winter.

Steve

MATTHEW
06-21-2002, 07:54 PM
Triclopyr is the A/I that gets the results. The You did apply at a good time for results as the plants were flowering, using up energy reserves and leaving the cell walls vulnerable for a kill.

Ground ivy and strawberry would be gone if you used confront or millenium. The thing about violets is that they have a waxy surface and they repel water (and herbicide) to a degree. That is why millenium gets my vote. The dicamba works by attacking the weeds through the roots.

Hate to say it, but June 20 (with this weather) is not the best time to get control. Especially if you have sensitive turfgrasses in a non-irrigated lawn.

tremor
06-21-2002, 11:05 PM
Clopyralid is also root absorbed. But it's also much more highly active. Even a small quantity will prove lethal to the weeds listed.

Check the lable for the very low use rate.

http://www.bluebooktor.com/Library/..\docs\label\L47578.PDF

DOW Agro owns both trichlopyr & clopyralid. They used to market trichlopyr extensiveley before they got clopyralid approved. Remember Turflon? These guys don't give up one formulation for another just to have fun. They do it for money. To replace a superior product with an inferior one would be rather self defeating & grossly irresponsible to their bottom line. Marketing both would be foolish too. So we find Lontrel, which is clopyralid.

I used triclopyr since 1984 or 85. It's a great herbicide. Much better than 2,4-D or dicamba. Safer too. But clopyralid is the best of the best in MHO.

Try them yourselves, then decide. Just watch for shallow rooted ornamentals!

Steve

MATTHEW
06-21-2002, 11:30 PM
Be careful about using triclopyr near flowers and some shrubs.
On a hot, hazy day, it can produce a gas that can twist the leaves on those plants.

FERT REP
06-22-2002, 09:31 AM
Whatever you may decide to use I would highly recommend using spreader sticker with your herbicide applications. At a cost around $2-4 per 100 gallons it will not only assist in preventing "rain outs" but will also improve efficacy of any herbicide. I found it works very well in breaking down the waxy cuticle of violets.