PDA

View Full Version : 7.3L powerstroke cold start


mowerbrad
03-26-2010, 02:32 PM
I found a 2001 F350 powerstroke near me that I'm pretty interested in. I test drove it the other day and was pretty pleased with how it ran. I did some homework on the truck and went back today to go over it a little more and look at all the little things. The truck sat overnight, which got down to about 20 degrees, and this morning it was about 33 degrees when I went to look at it. It did not want to start!!!! It would turn over a little but wouldn't start. The more we tried, the more "dead" the batteries sounded. We even tried to jump start the truck from my truck and couldn't get it to go. The dealer ran a volt meter out to test the batteries and they read fully charged.

The dealer called the previous owner to see what he did to start the truck on the "chillier" mornings, and the owner said he would always plug in the truck once the night temps got down to the 30's or so. But even my 6.5 diesel sits in this kind of weather unplugged and starts perfectly fine, actually, I didn't even plug my truck in all winter this year.

I have talked to a few people who currently own or used to own 7.3's and they said that when it gets down to the temps we are seeing now, they would plug their trucks in otherwise they would start hard or wouldn't start.

Does this sound like a glow plug issue or is this actually normal for these engines? If it is a glow plug issue I know it would be near $700 for those to be changed and all new ones put in. Any ideas?

AintNoFun
03-26-2010, 02:40 PM
i would say its glow plugs, or theres a relay or sensor that controls the glow plugs (if i remember correctly). i had to do one in one of our 7.3l's a few years ago. i dont remember the glow plugs costing 700 though, thought it was much cheaper...

mowerbrad
03-26-2010, 02:56 PM
As far as the price for the glow plug repair, I'm going by about how much it cost to have the glow plugs on my 6.5 changed out (all 8)....which as I recall it was near $700 for me to have my mechanic do it, and that was with a slight discount I think too.

AndyTblc
03-26-2010, 03:22 PM
All the people I know with 7.3's always plug their trucks in when it gets cold, it's just how they are.

Moto52
03-26-2010, 04:00 PM
It's either the Glow Plug Relay is not working, or all or must of the glow plugs are not working. My 7.3 starts fine in -20 when everything is working properly. it's about 20 bucks per glow plug if you do it yourself it's not to hard to do just pop the valve covers off. I think you can even switch one of the other relays out with the GPR to see if thats the problem before you buy a new one, and if that doesn't work you definitely need new glow plugs..

Moto52
03-26-2010, 04:06 PM
You should check out www.ford-trucks.com forums and scroll down to 1999-2003 powerstroke 7.3 and there is lots of good info on that site...

mowerbrad
03-26-2010, 04:35 PM
I'm not mechanically inclined enough to do this myself, so it would be going into my mechanic, if I were to buy the truck. I get the feeling that it does have a glow plug issue whether it be the actual glow plugs or the relay. And being that it was 30+ degrees outside, I still think it should have started easier even if it had a couple glow plugs out.

This isn't a deal breaker for me, but the price will need to be right for me to buy it then, just to compensate for the extra money I will have to spend on the glow plug issue then.

WH401
03-26-2010, 04:39 PM
Try a new glow plug relay first, then try new glow plugs. They can be a common failure on the 7.3 that keeps them from starting when the outside temps dive. When both of those things are working properly the 7.3 should have no problem starting at temps near 0, at least. Plugging it in to get it start is not the norm for these engines. If that has to be done then one of those two things most likely needs to be fixed.

mowerbrad
03-26-2010, 04:51 PM
When we tried to start it, it sounded pretty much like the batteries were dead or dying (thats the best way I can put it). But all the lights in the truck would come on and wouldn't even dim. Does this still sound like a glow plug related issue?

BrandonV
03-26-2010, 05:23 PM
volt meter won't tell you if the batteries are good, chance are they're not. it's all about the amps, the battery will likely still output 12V but the amps are what's going to turn over that motor.

JABBERS
03-26-2010, 05:29 PM
I would first check glow plug relay. Then I would check the glow plugs I would start with the wiring they could need replaced about $40. Glow plugs are like $12 a piece. This repair should not cost you $700. This should take about 2.5hrs to do. If that doesn't work then could be injector seals. Have the guy plug the truck in and go over early in the morning and give it a try. These motors don't start that good when its cold. Its easier to just plug them in.

Moto52
03-26-2010, 06:02 PM
When we tried to start it, it sounded pretty much like the batteries were dead or dying (thats the best way I can put it). But all the lights in the truck would come on and wouldn't even dim. Does this still sound like a glow plug related issue?

It definitely sounds like it can be a combination of things, it makes a huge difference on cold starts if you have weak batteries.. look at the batteries and see if there original, since there 7 year old I can't see them being original but if the guy was getting rid of the truck he could of thrown some cheap ass batteries in it.. they should be alteast 800CCA mine are 900 in my truck check they could be 650 or something like that. either way it's got to be one of the three things battery's/GPR/GlowPLugs

mowerbrad
03-26-2010, 08:11 PM
I got a call from the dealer this afternoon and he said that after plugging in the truck for a few hours it started fine. They ran it around town for a while and it did just fine.

We did try to jump start the truck from my truck with no luck. We let my truck idle for a bit while connected to the f350 and then while starting we had my truck up to 2000 rpm's, and still nothing. But after the truck was plugged in for a couple hours, it did just fine starting apparently.

I will have to check what size the batteries are to make sure they are the right size for the truck. I do know that they are spartan batteries though.

JABBERS
03-26-2010, 08:14 PM
The batteries went dead because of the cold start issue. I would have the batteries checked if you were going to replace them get at least 900 cold cranking amps. I have 1000 cold cranking amps.

esnipe8
03-26-2010, 08:19 PM
My 2000 with 212k on it does the same thing. When temps got down to the high 30's and lower it would turn over but not start. In Colorado with temps down to the high teens it took about three attempts to fire it up in the morning.
But I dont remember it sounding like a dead battery, just wouldnt start? Either way it was about 65 today, so no worries!

Gravel Rat
03-26-2010, 08:29 PM
Plug the block heater in and let it sit for 4 hours if it fires up you can rule out the CPS which is like the ignition module on a gas engine.

A funny question did you check the oil :laugh:

The 7.3 will not start if the truck is really low on oil because it uses the engine oil to operate the injectors.

With the glow plugs usually it will want to try fire if you have 1 or 2 GPs not working.

Low batteries also is a problem the PSD needs cranking power to build up oil pressure to fire the injectors.

mowerbrad
03-26-2010, 08:41 PM
The oil level was fine (yes I did check).

The first two times I tried to start the engine, it sounded like the batteries had enough power, but then after that (even when hooked up to my truck) it sounded very weak.

And the block heater was plugged in for roughly 4 hours this afternoon and I guess it started fine.

CLARK LAWN
03-27-2010, 12:42 AM
tak a test light and make sure you have power on both sides of the glow plug relay ( the rearmost of the two). mine was doing the same thing and the relay was bad. cheap ones are about 20-30 bucks at autozone.

zabmasonry
03-27-2010, 12:48 AM
BTW -

your current 6.5 is one of the best cold starting diesels because it is indirect ignition, and has an ungodly high compression ratio. it is also less prone to wet stacking.

my old 6.5 started on its own (cold, no plug) down to -40 (the lowest it ever got when I owned it, but it took darn near forever for it to heat up). only issue I ever had was when a battery @#%& the bed and I didn't notice.

Low power, and injection issues aside (which can be dealt with if you really want to) the 6.5 was a pretty decent engine.

mowerbrad
03-27-2010, 03:36 PM
So I went back today see if the truck would start and to see what else I could find with it. They had it parked inside their shop overnight but didn't plug it in or on a battery charger, so it just sat in their garage which is heated to about 60 degrees. It did start fine when I started it up and started pretty easily. I checked the size of the batteries and they were rated at 875 cca. I looked at the exhaust as I started the engine and it had a small amount of white smoke upon the initial start but within about 1-2 seconds it was perfectly clear exhaust.

Evan528
03-27-2010, 07:30 PM
Does sound like maybe a glow plug or 2 are bad......

Raymond S.
03-28-2010, 12:48 AM
One more thing not mentioned yet.
My 96 was like that last winter. If I didn't plug it in it wouldn't start. This year I thought alright, no more pissin around. Went out and bought two brand new Optima yellow tops. First cold morning, engine barely started. I thought WTF. Long story short, starter was fried. It was pulling too much of a drain on the batteries and wouldn't start. Put the old batteries in (NAPA legend 950CCA) with new starter and kabang, starts like a champ. I NEVER plugged my truck in all winter. Turn the key, wait about 10 seconds and pops off like butter. So, if you get the truck just for kicks have them check the starter. Yeah, it may turn the truck over but it may be drawing down the batteries so far that even a brand new $175 Optima can't spin it fast enough.

Green' Go
03-28-2010, 12:57 AM
I agree with Andytblc. I have several friends with those 7.3s and they all plug them in if its under 35 or so. Small price to pay for a pretty awsome engine to me.

mowerbrad
03-28-2010, 02:21 PM
So I'm getting a little conflictling stories....some people say these trucks should start no problem in cold weather and others say that they need to be plugged in to start when its cold outside. The problem I run into is that there will be times when I won't be able to plug in my truck for 12 hours or so while it sits outside in the cold. And at these times, there is absolutely no way for me to plug in the truck. It could be 15 degrees outside and the truck could sit anywhere from 10.5-14 hours without being plugged in or started. So I don't want to buy this truck if I have to plug it in just for it to start after sitting for that long.

Mowingman
03-28-2010, 02:42 PM
Ok, I have had 14 of the 7.3 Powerstrokes. I always plugged them in whenever it was below 40 degrees. Below 40, they all seemed a little "cranky" about starting right up, but, they all would eventually start. some took more cranking than others.
I also found, that after the first startup/warmup on a cold morning, I never had problems with them during the day, even if they set 10 or 12 hours, as long as you had TWO, good strong batteries in them. If you had one, or both battereis that were weak, a cold start after 10 hours or so was sometimes iffy.
The one I have now has all the glow plug system working great, and two good batteries. After setting overnight, unplugged, in 25 degree temps. and snow, it started right up.
The one I just sold, had two new batteries, and some problems with the glow plugs, (not sure how many were working). It was very iffy to start after sitting anytime in the cold for more than 8 hours. If the batteries had not been brand new, it would not have started at all, as it needed to be cranked, A LOT.
I would not worry about that truck you are looking at. Just toss two brand new batteries in it, and you will probably be good to go. If it continues to be hard to crank in the cold, then have the glow plug system tested out. allow about $500.00, worst case, for glow plug system repairs if needed.
also, have a look at the condition of the battery cable ends at the battery posts. It does not take much corrosion to reduce the juice you are getting during cranking. They all need to be super clean.

mowerbrad
03-28-2010, 02:59 PM
I'm just waiting on a couple things the hopefully play out right for me. If everything falls into place, I will have the truck brought over to my mechanic and have them go through everything to make sure that it all checks out. So I'll probably have them check the glow plug system, starter, batteries and connections.

The only other problems that I found, was that the passenger door lock and window are both "sticky" or slow to respond so I'll probably have to have some motors replaced for the power locks and windows in that door. And the last thing I found was that the digital computer (compass, outside temp gauge, etc) wouldn't light up, so I couldn't tell if that worked or not.

NJlandscaper908
03-28-2010, 08:53 PM
I have a 2000 F250 with a 7.3 and had the same problem when I bought it. It had been sitting and was cold out, the only way it started was by plugging it in but once I got it home and it sat it wouldent start, not even after it sat in a 50 degree garage. My mechanic replaced the glow plug relay and it fired right up. Check that and pour a bottle of anti-gel in the tank every time you fill up when its below 40 degrees. I never plug mine in and it always fires right up

mowerbrad
03-28-2010, 10:18 PM
If I do decide to go further with this truck and have my mechanics look at it, I will make sure to mention the glow plug system and starter.

But there has been one thing that has been bugging me about the truck....the climate controls. In almost every ford vehicle I ride in whether it be the truck I'm looking at or a taurus I feel like when the heat/AC is on, it is just shooting in my face....is that just me? I come from GM's where I can turn on the A/C separately and choose which vents the air will come out of, but on the ford to have the A/C on you can't choose which vents it comes out of. And even when I put the heat down to the lower vents I still feel like I'm getting some heat in my face, its a little annoying to me. Is that just me or is it the few ford vehicles I have riden in? I just feel like the heat/AC is always blasting in my face.

Mowingman
03-28-2010, 10:25 PM
No choice on A/C on any of my ford trucks. It comes out the dash vents, that is it.

Evan528
03-28-2010, 11:21 PM
never even took notice of this..... just angle the vents away from your face!

mowerbrad
03-29-2010, 12:16 AM
It usually feels like the heat is coming out of the vents for the defogger on the dash board. So there really is no choice of aiming the vents away from my face. Its something I could live with but it is a little annoying.

WH401
03-29-2010, 09:01 AM
Let me say again, it is not normal for a 7.3 Powerstroke to have to be plugged in. If it has to be plugged in then something is wrong, most likely the glow plugs/batteries/starter...all of those things effect the starting ability. My 01' Excursion has no problem starting in the single digits when left sitting overnight, not being plugged in. All of those parts I mentioned are all healthy on it and that's why it has no problem.

I mean honestly guys?, I know it's a Ford but even they know that if they sold a truck engine that couldn't started below 40 degrees without being plugged in that they'd be up s**t's creek without a paddle. How many guys use there trucks and go camping in a colder climate, or hunting somewhere up north, or anything else that involves frigid temperatures. If it were so that you had to plug the truck in then you could never go anywhere because you'd be "cord-locked".

The 7.3 didn't become the best diesel engine ever put in a Ford pick up by not being able to start without help below 40 degrees outside ambient air temperature.:hammerhead:

Mowerbrad, go watch this (http://powerstrokehelp.com/7.3liter/starters_bateries/1of1.asp) video from Powerstrokehelp.com. It's explain the necessity of having good batteries in a 7.3.

mowerbrad
03-29-2010, 10:31 AM
Let me say again, it is not normal for a 7.3 Powerstroke to have to be plugged in. If it has to be plugged in then something is wrong, most likely the glow plugs/batteries/starter...all of those things effect the starting ability. My 01' Excursion has no problem starting in the single digits when left sitting overnight, not being plugged in. All of those parts I mentioned are all healthy on it and that's why it has no problem.

I mean honestly guys?, I know it's a Ford but even they know that if they sold a truck engine that couldn't started below 40 degrees without being plugged in that they'd be up s**t's creek without a paddle. How many guys use there trucks and go camping in a colder climate, or hunting somewhere up north, or anything else that involves frigid temperatures. If it were so that you had to plug the truck in then you could never go anywhere because you'd be "cord-locked".

The 7.3 didn't become the best diesel engine ever put in a Ford pick up by not being able to start without help below 40 degrees outside ambient air temperature.:hammerhead:

Mowerbrad, go watch this (http://powerstrokehelp.com/7.3liter/starters_bateries/1of1.asp) video from Powerstrokehelp.com. It's explain the necessity of having good batteries in a 7.3.

Thanks for that...the video was quite helpful. Actually the one truck he showed that didn't start was very similar to my experience with the truck I'm looking at. I'll definately my sure my mechanics look into some of the stuff that has been mentioned.

TXNSLighting
03-30-2010, 12:56 AM
Second what WH401 said. Mine will start under 30 degrees fine. Now before when the alternater was about to go it wouldnt. Mine actually has 2 glow plugs gone so anything under 20 and i have to plug in, but once i replace them all (Cost me $350) Ill be set for the coldest it gets around here. high singles. These trucks are all over canada and such places. They will start in the cold.

mowerbrad
04-04-2010, 05:52 PM
I have one more question about this truck (hopefully I won't have to start a new thread to get some answers)....

What fuel economy can I expect to get with a 350? I have heard claims of 18-22mpg (65-70mph) on the highway and 14-16mpg in the city. These numbers are fairly important to me as I would like to have increased fuel economy from what I have now, which now I'm getting about 13-14 city and only 16-17 highway.

TXNSLighting
04-04-2010, 08:38 PM
depending on gears, (mine has 4:10s) mine will get 17 hwy, and 12-13 in town. with 3:73s you should get about 20 hwy and 14 maybe 15 in town. exhaust and a intake will help alot.
Posted via Mobile Device

mowerbrad
04-04-2010, 08:48 PM
The 350 I'm looking at does have 3:73 gears...I will be looking into the exhaust and intake...any idea how much that may help my fuel economy?

TXNSLighting
04-04-2010, 08:57 PM
it all depends on your foot, maybe 1 mpg. with a programmer maybe 2-3...MAYBE

mowerbrad
04-04-2010, 09:03 PM
I don't exactly have a heavy foot, so I'm usually pretty easy on the throttle.

1mpg doesn't exactly warrent a new exhaust and intake right away then, maybe I'll wait on that a little and work on that over time. But if those things would be better for the engine I may do them sooner.

stroker51
04-04-2010, 11:15 PM
I would do exhaust and intake as soon as you can. You will gain a little in the mileage department, and I know on my Super Duty that it pulled a trailer noticeably better once I put my K & N on. But, my truck is doing good to get 16 on the highway, 11-13 in town no trailer. It has the 3:73's. This was a shock to me because the crew cab long bed dually 4x4 I traded on it had 4:10's and would get 18-19 highway empty and 13-14ish in town with a mowing trailer, closer to 10 in town with the bobcat behind it. The only time my super duty has a starting problem is when it's due for an oil change, it will start but have a hard time idleing once it tries to kick up to high idle if the oils getting old/a little low. When I traded my dually it had 150k on it and started everyday. I have a 96 F350 dump that started up every time I ask it to all winter to go salt, and we had mornings close to if not at 0 this winter.

mowerbrad
04-04-2010, 11:49 PM
Wow...only 16 on the highway with the 3:73's!!!

I've done a little looking around at some exhausts and intakes and with the price of them, I will have to wait a little while before going fully into it, unless I could get a fantastic deal on the truck.

stroker51
04-05-2010, 11:09 AM
Get a Tymar intake, for the old body style trucks they are like $150 or less, and you can get an S-pipe that fits where the muffler was for about the same, just cut out the muffler and weld in the pipe, not the best exhaust, but any way you can open it up will help. Ya, you are telling me, only 16 with 3:73's...not real thrilled with that truck.

stroker51
04-05-2010, 11:11 AM
But, my edge box does have the computer fooled. The readout in the ceiling says im getting 21.5 lol.

Moto52
04-05-2010, 12:48 PM
The best mileage I have ever gotten is 18.21 MPG and on average driving with some city and some highway I only get 14 to 15 mpg. Crewcab shortbox 4x4 3.73 gearing, lift kit, 35inch tires,

Moto52
04-05-2010, 12:50 PM
Oh yea and thats with Banks turbo back exhuast 4inch, AFE cold are intake, DP Tuner, auto meter pillar gauges Boost, EGT, Tranny..

TXNSLighting
04-05-2010, 07:49 PM
The best mileage I have ever gotten is 18.21 MPG and on average driving with some city and some highway I only get 14 to 15 mpg. Crewcab shortbox 4x4 3.73 gearing, lift kit, 35inch tires,

Lift kit and 35's are why your getting 18! I bet your truck runs good!

mowerbrad
04-05-2010, 08:01 PM
Whatever truck I get, it will not be lifted at all. After hearing about the exhaust and intakes, it makes me think that those would be beneficial...but what exactly will those two things help with?

I've also been contemplating whether or not I should put a programmer on the truck. I wouldn't use it at a high setting, just a low setting to help with fuel economy. My mechanic said that as long as I only use a mild program I should do no harm to the truck.

WH401
04-05-2010, 08:44 PM
Whatever truck I get, it will not be lifted at all. After hearing about the exhaust and intakes, it makes me think that those would be beneficial...but what exactly will those two things help with?

I've also been contemplating whether or not I should put a programmer on the truck. I wouldn't use it at a high setting, just a low setting to help with fuel economy. My mechanic said that as long as I only use a mild program I should do no harm to the truck.

A few things to think about on an exhaust and intake. 1, exhaust system typically make diesel engine louder, and while that may be nice to you, the customers you service daily may not think the same. Some may think it's obnoxious enough to drop you. 2nd-ly, the problem with the high flow intakes is just that, they're "high flowing". Do you know how they get that high flowing? By lowering the filtration of the filter to make it suck in more air more easily and then making up for the lack of filtration by using an oil to catch most of the particles before they are sucked in. I.e., while intakes are nice, they don't filter as good as the stock box.

As for a programmer...it's going to be your work truck right? Those are two things that should never be put together. Programmer and work truck. While your mechanic may say you'll be fine, it all depends on how the truck has been used previously and how much input the truck gets from your right foot. Putting a programmer on a stock truck, a work truck no less, is just asking for trouble. If you some how get stranded, and can't make it to the clients houses that your supposed to be at...your going to be SOL.

Just some stuff to think about.

Moto52
04-05-2010, 09:39 PM
Lift kit and 35's are why your getting 18! I bet your truck runs good!

When it didn't have the lift and tires I was very very lucky to even get 19MPG so it only dropped about 2 mpg with the lift and tires.. but with the crappy winter diesel fuel i've been getting 13mpg no matter what I do highway or city.

Moto52
04-05-2010, 09:45 PM
A few things to think about on an exhaust and intake. 1, exhaust system typically make diesel engine louder, and while that may be nice to you, the customers you service daily may not think the same. Some may think it's obnoxious enough to drop you. 2nd-ly, the problem with the high flow intakes is just that, they're "high flowing". Do you know how they get that high flowing? By lowering the filtration of the filter to make it suck in more air more easily and then making up for the lack of filtration by using an oil to catch most of the particles before they are sucked in. I.e., while intakes are nice, they don't filter as good as the stock box.

As for a programmer...it's going to be your work truck right? Those are two things that should never be put together. Programmer and work truck. While your mechanic may say you'll be fine, it all depends on how the truck has been used previously and how much input the truck gets from your right foot. Putting a programmer on a stock truck, a work truck no less, is just asking for trouble. If you some how get stranded, and can't make it to the clients houses that your supposed to be at...your going to be SOL.

Just some stuff to think about.



There is nothing wrong with getting a good programmer like DP, Tony Wildman. they firm up the shifts so your tranny lasts longer. the most important thing is you have to get gauges then you will never hurt the motor.. and stay far away from Edge, Hypertech, Banks etc those programmers will wreck stuff... Just don't get a K&N cold air intake there filters are known to let to many particuls through the filter, stick to AFE or something like that..

WH401
04-06-2010, 08:47 AM
There is nothing wrong with getting a good programmer like DP, Tony Wildman. they firm up the shifts so your tranny lasts longer. the most important thing is you have to get gauges then you will never hurt the motor.. and stay far away from Edge, Hypertech, Banks etc those programmers will wreck stuff... Just don't get a K&N cold air intake there filters are known to let to many particuls through the filter, stick to AFE or something like that..

If you re-read my post you'll notice I never said there was anything wrong with a programmer itself. I said it's not wise to put a programmer on a truck that is going be making your living. Mixing work and play is never a smart thing...eventually it'll bite you in the a$$.

mowerbrad
04-06-2010, 04:14 PM
If I do get a programmer on my truck, it will be set on a very mild setting and will not be changed from that setting. My truck will NOT be raised up, won't have larger tires put on it, won't be used to go off-roading...I'm pretty easy on my truck.

Moto52
04-06-2010, 09:31 PM
If you re-read my post you'll notice I never said there was anything wrong with a programmer itself. I said it's not wise to put a programmer on a truck that is going be making your living. Mixing work and play is never a smart thing...eventually it'll bite you in the a$$.


I didn't mean get a programmer to put a race tune on it. I have stock, High Idle, 60Tow, 80Econ, 140 Aggressive, using your truck for work on 60 tow is a great tune way better then stock and it's not hard on your truck...

Moto52
04-06-2010, 09:36 PM
If I do get a programmer on my truck, it will be set on a very mild setting and will not be changed from that setting. My truck will NOT be raised up, won't have larger tires put on it, won't be used to go off-roading...I'm pretty easy on my truck.

so are you going to buy this ford with the cold starting problem or have you moved on looking for another truck???

bearmtnmartin
04-06-2010, 10:28 PM
Didn't read the whole thread, but my brother has an 02 7.3 and it won't start at all cold. He has spent a lot of money and no go. He has to plug it in year round and even then its iffy. And its sure not the glow plug circuit.

Moto52
04-06-2010, 10:38 PM
Didn't read the whole thread, but my brother has an 02 7.3 and it won't start at all cold. He has spent a lot of money and no go. He has to plug it in year round and even then its iffy. And its sure not the glow plug circuit.

I think he needs to find a different mechanic.....:confused:

WH401
04-06-2010, 11:17 PM
I didn't mean get a programmer to put a race tune on it. I have stock, High Idle, 60Tow, 80Econ, 140 Aggressive, using your truck for work on 60 tow is a great tune way better then stock and it's not hard on your truck...

Neither did I, and no matter if it's 60 over stock, or 160, the point is still the same. A programmer is fun no doubt, but it stresses components and can cause any random part to fail, especially on a stock truck that already has miles on it. And when that happens, particularly on a truck that is helping to make you your living, it's not going to be a good thing. Remember, "You play, you pay".

For a side thought, if the OP is getting along with the power of his 6.5, I think he'll be more than happy with the power of an 01' Powerstroke. Enough so that he probably won't even worry about a programmer.

mowerbrad
04-06-2010, 11:23 PM
I'm still very interested in this 350...I'm just waiting on a couple things before I start moving further with it.

The programmer won't be something I put on the truck really soon if I get it, it would be a little ways down the road. I'll see how things go with the truck the first year and then after that we'll see.

bearmtnmartin
04-07-2010, 12:43 AM
I think he needs to find a different mechanic.....:confused:

Well...the dealer and several other shops. They can't all be stupid. I'm not saying it can't be fixed, just that it's not the glow plug circuit. So to buy a truck assuming a no start condition is a simple repair may be a bit short sighted? Why did the guy trade it in? Umm... because it won't start?

bearmtnmartin
04-07-2010, 12:49 AM
A few things to think about on an exhaust and intake. 1, exhaust system typically make diesel engine louder, and while that may be nice to you, the customers you service daily may not think the same. Some may think it's obnoxious enough to drop you. 2nd-ly, the problem with the high flow intakes is just that, they're "high flowing". Do you know how they get that high flowing? By lowering the filtration of the filter to make it suck in more air more easily and then making up for the lack of filtration by using an oil to catch most of the particles before they are sucked in. I.e., while intakes are nice, they don't filter as good as the stock box.

As for a programmer...it's going to be your work truck right? Those are two things that should never be put together. Programmer and work truck. While your mechanic may say you'll be fine, it all depends on how the truck has been used previously and how much input the truck gets from your right foot. Putting a programmer on a stock truck, a work truck no less, is just asking for trouble. If you some how get stranded, and can't make it to the clients houses that your supposed to be at...your going to be SOL.

Just some stuff to think about.


I can second that. My 6.5 was far quicker than a stock 7.3. It had everything I could think of doing to it and it pulled my machine like it wasn't there. And it gets great mileage now because its sitting in the driveway with a thrown rod...or a broken crank. I never pulled the pan to see what caused the hole........... So the new Dodge doesn't get any go fast stuff.

Moto52
04-07-2010, 08:01 PM
I can second that. My 6.5 was far quicker than a stock 7.3. It had everything I could think of doing to it and it pulled my machine like it wasn't there. And it gets great mileage now because its sitting in the driveway with a thrown rod...or a broken crank. I never pulled the pan to see what caused the hole........... So the new Dodge doesn't get any go fast stuff.


Am I reading this right? are you talking about a 6.5 litre Detroit engine in a chevy truck has more power then a stock 7.3?

mowerbrad
04-07-2010, 08:35 PM
After I started my search for my 'new' truck, I've driven many trucks...duramax, 7.3 and 6.0 powerstrokes and 5.9 cummins...and all of them had more power than my 6.5. My personal favorite when driving has been the duramax followed very closely by the 7.3 powerstroke.

But after test driving a truck and then getting back into my 6.5, it is a world of difference.

bearmtnmartin
04-07-2010, 09:39 PM
You misunderstood me. My truck had(has) a Heath chip, a turbo master, marine injectors, and some other stuff. It is definately not stock and it was very quick. but I used it to pull a heavy machine and it airmailed a rod. Or something.

mowerbrad
04-07-2010, 09:49 PM
you misunderstood me. My truck had(has) a heath chip, a turbo master, marine injectors, and some other stuff. It is definately not stock and it was very quick. But i used it to pull a heavy machine and it airmailed a rod. Or something.

.......10-4

Moto52
04-07-2010, 09:51 PM
You misunderstood me. My truck had(has) a Heath chip, a turbo master, marine injectors, and some other stuff. It is definately not stock and it was very quick. but I used it to pull a heavy machine and it airmailed a rod. Or something.

Oh ok yea that makes sence i thought you were talking about just a stock 6.5, I use to own a 1999 chev 6.5 diesel before I bought my 2002 ford 7.3 and there is no comparison....

Moto52
04-07-2010, 10:00 PM
After I started my search for my 'new' truck, I've driven many trucks...duramax, 7.3 and 6.0 powerstrokes and 5.9 cummins...and all of them had more power than my 6.5. My personal favorite when driving has been the duramax followed very closely by the 7.3 powerstroke.

But after test driving a truck and then getting back into my 6.5, it is a world of difference.

Yea I like the power of the duramax and how there very quiet in the cab, but not enough for me to sell my truck and get one...

mowerbrad
04-07-2010, 10:19 PM
Yea I like the power of the duramax and how there very quiet in the cab, but not enough for me to sell my truck and get one...

The duramax trucks are quiet and fast (as far as stock trucks go) which was why I liked them so much. They also have the allison trannies, which I like just since they are a pretty solid tranny with a good reputation. But the more I looked into them, the more I realized that if something went wrong on it, it was going to be a REALLY EXPENSIVE fix, both engine and tranny related.

The 7.3's are relatively simple engines from a mechanical standpoint. Repair costs are closer to the costs of my 6.5 repairs (lower than that of a duramax repair) and it is a much easier engine to access things.

The best way my mechanic said was that if a water pump went on a duramax, I'm looking at a $1000 repair but if a water pump went on a 6.5 or 7.3, it's more of a $400-$500 repair. That is pretty much what sold me on the 7.3 powerstrokes.

Moto52
04-07-2010, 10:43 PM
The duramax trucks are quiet and fast (as far as stock trucks go) which was why I liked them so much. They also have the allison trannies, which I like just since they are a pretty solid tranny with a good reputation. But the more I looked into them, the more I realized that if something went wrong on it, it was going to be a REALLY EXPENSIVE fix, both engine and tranny related.

The 7.3's are relatively simple engines from a mechanical standpoint. Repair costs are closer to the costs of my 6.5 repairs (lower than that of a duramax repair) and it is a much easier engine to access things.

The best way my mechanic said was that if a water pump went on a duramax, I'm looking at a $1000 repair but if a water pump went on a 6.5 or 7.3, it's more of a $400-$500 repair. That is pretty much what sold me on the 7.3 powerstrokes.

Yea duramaxs are crazy expensive in repairs a friend of mine blew a head gasket and it was cheaper for him to buy a used engine then it was to fix it:confused:..... 5grand later just for a head gasket....