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View Full Version : St. Augustine Decline


rwsawal04
04-07-2010, 11:54 AM
Has anyone ever seen this in st. augustine, if so what is it and how do you treat it?183587

183588

gunsnroses
04-07-2010, 12:46 PM
looks like brown patch... poke some holes, contact and systemic fungicide. Check the labels...some fungicides are not labeled for residential. check your water schedule

Kevin M.
04-07-2010, 03:26 PM
The top one looks to me like armyworms and I agree the second picture is brown patch. Spray it with fungicide and check the irrigation and adjust accordingly since I always see brown patch this time of year if the irrigation system was running all winter long.

BearWise Landscapers
04-07-2010, 03:45 PM
When you find a solution, you need to come fix a few yards in my neighborhood that look like that!

unkownfl
04-07-2010, 03:55 PM
Top looks like last years fungus and bottom is this years damage.

ICT Bill
04-07-2010, 04:27 PM
Difficult to tell without being there, my bet is Take all patch
It can take out an entire St Aug lawn in a week if conditions are right

Greg Amann
04-07-2010, 07:51 PM
Not sure when the pics were taken, but it looks very similar to what a yard here looks like that had brown patch in the fall and follow by severe cold damage.
For the severe cold damage we suggest top dressing with 1.5 - 2 inches of sand and we fertilize it. Generally in three months the area is covered back up with a nice stand of St. Augustine.

ArTurf
04-08-2010, 12:10 PM
U of Ark warned of winter kill on St Aug lawns due to severe winter, not saying that is it just thought I would throw that in.

I have a St Aug lawn that has take-all patch, I have sent samples off and had analyzed. The good thing about St Aug is it fills in quick under good conditions. The bad you probably already know.

txgrassguy
04-08-2010, 01:23 PM
First thing I'd do is check for soil borne insects.
If none than submit a sample to your local extension dept for analysis.
Most residential use fungicides will typically treat most pathogens but I'd suggest a
good hollow core aeration followed by an aggressive spring tine raking to expose the soil.
Spray with a liquid fert containing no more than 20% quickly available N then topdress.

dce7777
04-24-2010, 11:55 PM
All it is dead grass. All the St Augustine in the south is like that right now. We had abnormally long warm spells in Jan and Feb. where the grass came out of dormancy and started to grow, then about that time we would have a week or more of freezing weather with several times of big snow falls, which would in turn kill the grass. Then all that would go away and it would warm up substantially for several weeks, that once again would make the grass start to grow again, then the week long freeze happened again. This process happened more than enough times over a 2-3 month period.

To fix this issue, just rake out and bag the dead grass, just enough to get the smothering layer off the lawn. Then put down compost and within a week or so you will start seeing it green up and growing in these spots again. Within month, you will barely even noticed it was ever there.

jvanvliet
05-01-2010, 07:09 PM
All it is dead grass. All the St Augustine in the south is like that right now. We had abnormally long warm spells in Jan and Feb. where the grass came out of dormancy and started to grow, then about that time we would have a week or more of freezing weather with several times of big snow falls, which would in turn kill the grass. Then all that would go away and it would warm up substantially for several weeks, that once again would make the grass start to grow again, then the week long freeze happened again. This process happened more than enough times over a 2-3 month period.

To fix this issue, just rake out and bag the dead grass, just enough to get the smothering layer off the lawn. Then put down compost and within a week or so you will start seeing it green up and growing in these spots again. Within month, you will barely even noticed it was ever there.

I don't know if that will work well on large areas, I'd look for insect infestation, fungi, recomend a licensed applicator to treat the area even if only prophylactically then I'd rake out the dead grass, and replace it with fresh turf. My experience is that your recomendation will work ok with small areas (down here we use sugar sand to encourage the centipede) but larger areas will fill in with undesirable weeds and grasses before the St. Augustine does.