PDA

View Full Version : where to dump clippings, bushes, etc


Juan91
04-07-2010, 03:47 PM
i have always put these things out by my house, but now with the business expanding, im lost as to where to put the stuff, my town and all surrounding don't have a dump site,

so where can i take it for removal?

thanks,
Juan

oakwdman
04-07-2010, 04:19 PM
What town are you in?

93Chevy
04-07-2010, 04:21 PM
Ask a local farmer.

Juan91
04-07-2010, 11:37 PM
im in lake zurich oak....60047

oakwdman
04-07-2010, 11:42 PM
I'd call local companies and ask them, couldnt hurt and at least you'll get some networking in.

Marcos
04-08-2010, 12:21 AM
i have always put these things out by my house, but now with the business expanding, im lost as to where to put the stuff, my town and all surrounding don't have a dump site,

so where can i take it for removal?

thanks,
Juan

As far as grass clippings go, why exactly are you collecting them?
Can't you mulch &/or side discharge more of your properties?
Collecting & hauling away grass clippings essentially wastes X% of the translocated value of whatever turf fertilizer's being applied.
Not to mention the fact that dumping grass clippings in a non-composting situation is ethically backwards & environmentally irresponsible.

If your clients INSIST that you must collect & haul away clippings, have you the room to begin a fledgling compost operation? :confused:
The conversion of biomass into fuels will become one of the fastest growing industries in this nation very soon.
Never too early to start practicing! :waving:

Treeline brush & torn-out old landscape material shouldn't be dumped in piles either. It should ideally be run through a large chipper & made into crude 'walking trail' grade chip-mulch.
I suggest that you take 15 minutes to call around or search the 'net to see if the township and/or county you live in has 1 or 2 central drop-off points for stuff like this.
A lot of them (at least in OH, KY & IN) won't charge for organic recycling drop-offs so long as you pass a visual inspection, both at entry & the dump site. They know charging for drop-offs discourages participation in many minds.
And of course, the REAL money's going to be made at a much later date when the final product (either chips, or part of a larger composition of compost) is sold back to contractors, municipalities, parks, stable managers & large estate owners.

pitrack
04-08-2010, 12:58 AM
As far as grass clippings go, why exactly are you collecting them?
Can't you mulch &/or side discharge more of your properties?
Collecting & hauling away grass clippings essentially wastes X% of the translocated value of whatever turf fertilizer's being applied.
Not to mention the fact that dumping grass clippings in a non-composting situation is ethically backwards & environmentally irresponsible.

If your clients INSIST that you must collect & haul away clippings, have you the room to begin a fledgling compost operation? :confused:
The conversion of biomass into fuels will become one of the fastest growing industries in this nation very soon.
Never too early to start practicing! :waving:

Treeline brush & torn-out old landscape material shouldn't be dumped in piles either. It should ideally be run through a large chipper & made into crude 'walking trail' grade chip-mulch.
I suggest that you take 15 minutes to call around or search the 'net to see if the township and/or county you live in has 1 or 2 central drop-off points for stuff like this.
A lot of them (at least in OH, KY & IN) won't charge for organic recycling drop-offs so long as you pass a visual inspection, both at entry & the dump site. They know charging for drop-offs discourages participation in many minds.
And of course, the REAL money's going to be made at a much later date when the final product (either chips, or part of a larger composition of compost) is sold back to contractors, municipalities, parks, stable managers & large estate owners.

Can I ask what you do with said materials? Just curious.

Juan91
04-08-2010, 10:37 AM
@marcos

1. im asked to bag the clippings, i charge more for disposal and time....
2. im looking for a composter for the grass
3. i have called around everywhere!

rcallese
04-10-2010, 09:25 PM
Just getting starte myself and having the same issue. 60+ bags of debris sitting in my trailer right now. I'm taking it to Thelen Sand and Gravel on 173 in Antioch. $14 a yard or $1 a bag. It's expensive but I need my trailer emptied. I'm going to keep looking for a better deal.

JB1
04-10-2010, 09:29 PM
sinkholes.

topsites
04-10-2010, 10:06 PM
In back of someone else's trailer :p

Seriously, have you tried mulch yards, some of them accept organic waste but
I would call around first, and there might be a fee as well but at least around here
it's a whole lot cheaper than...

Commercial dump.

ryde307
04-11-2010, 05:14 PM
Lots of mulch suppliers take it, call other landscapers they may take it for a small fee, otherwise farmers are the best many of them will take it and till it into there fields

fastpine
04-12-2010, 11:24 AM
How can your town not have a dump site?...Where does the towns trash go?...


When I go to the dump, 80% of whats being thrown is landcsapers organic refuse....Leaves, branches, clippings, bush trimmings.....Its disgusting, as I too am an avid compost supporter.

Juan91
04-13-2010, 10:53 AM
found a com poster to take it all in waconda for $16 a yard, brought 4 truck/trailer fulls of leaves stuff up there for $40 total :), also unloaded 8 bushes for free last week

Jb3NH
04-13-2010, 09:35 PM
hippies love compost. check out your farmers market. i keep all my leaves and compost for future use.

clean_cut
04-14-2010, 09:15 PM
Ask a local farmer.

Yeah, if you don't have room for a compost pile, maybe a local farmer would like it for theirs.

Marcos
04-16-2010, 08:21 AM
Can I ask what you do with said materials? Just curious.

We don't mow, so clippings usually isn't an issue for us.
We're bridge organic lawn care & landscaping.
So we do come up with copious amounts of landscape debris, dead bushes, trees limbs, etc from time to time.

If what we have is physically too much for our on-site compost pile, or it would contaminate it for whatever reason, I'll haul it over to an organic solid waste dumping site in the neighboring county where they're able to handle, process & compost stuff that's way out of our league in terms of sheer volume & size.
I don't pay a dime to dump relatively small loads (as compared to many of their other vendors) so long as I can prove the load is clean of rocks, plastic, garbage, etc.

These types of facilities, usually privately-run, will make their $$ by turning this around & and selling the finished compost & wood chip products back to government agencies and/or the general public a year or two later. :usflag:

IdahoGrass
04-16-2010, 09:51 AM
$16 a yard is crazy! I pay $3 a yard.

Edward Hunter Yard Works
04-16-2010, 10:00 AM
I live in the country, so, I just burn the limbs and leaveswhen ever I have to. Otherwise, I take it to a dump a few miles from me. FREE yard debris disposal!

Marcos
04-17-2010, 10:15 PM
I live in the country, so, I just burn the limbs and leaveswhen ever I have to. Otherwise, I take it to a dump a few miles from me. FREE yard debris disposal!

Burning? Oh, C'mon JM! Wake up! :hammerhead:
Don't you know you're wasting resources that could be of future value to you, for your own use, or for use in your landscape business?

If you really live in the country, then you should know the ins & outs of how to start a compost pile.
Not to mention the benefits of the compost itself for your lawn & garden, or for your clienteles' some time down the line! :waving: