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pdenney11
04-19-2010, 11:48 PM
I have a customer that had a pool installed last year. The pool has two hills around it. Customer basically wants to do away with having to mow the backyard. She has mentioned adding a retaining wall along the deep end side of the pool by the diving board but I doubt I can fit it into the budget she has given me and that is something I sub out anyways.

This is the first time I have ever designed around a pool. Most of our installs are front yard installs. I am having a real hard time coming up with types of plants to use in this install since everything will be close to the pool and I am worried about leaves and debris always blowing into the pool and runoff from the hills surrounding the pool. If you guys have any tips for planting around pools and placement in this landscape I would appreciate it.

pdenney11
04-19-2010, 11:53 PM
one more pic

Lawnut101
04-20-2010, 01:25 AM
What's the budget you have to work with? I think you could do some pretty nice muclh beds with shrubs in them. Or you could do different ground covers. I would like the look of dark colored mulch beds myself.

pdenney11
04-20-2010, 04:07 AM
3,500 is my budget. I was afraid the mulch would runoff into the pool with a hard rain. Do you think it will be an issue?
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pdenney11
04-20-2010, 08:27 AM
I do like the ground cover idea. That would help fill up some open spots on the larger hills.
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Armadillolawncare
04-20-2010, 06:34 PM
For $3500 you aren't going to get much more then mulch and a few shrubs.

Cloud9Landscapes
04-20-2010, 09:01 PM
For $3500 you aren't going to get much more then mulch and a few shrubs.

I must agree with this. Sadly.

The retaining wall is a must in my opinion. As far as plantings go, I would go with a ground cover like an Ivy or some stolonous growing groundcover. Planting I would go with ornamental grasses and maybe some low maintenance shrubs like brush cherry, hawthorne, rose, etc. I would irrigate with 12" pop-ups.

pdenney11
04-20-2010, 09:49 PM
I must agree with this. Sadly.

The retaining wall is a must in my opinion. As far as plantings go, I would go with a ground cover like an Ivy or some stolonous growing groundcover. Planting I would go with ornamental grasses and maybe some low maintenance shrubs like brush cherry, hawthorne, rose, etc. I would irrigate with 12" pop-ups.

Would you put a retaining wall just on the side with the diving board or around the left side by the hot tub also?

Lawnut101
04-21-2010, 12:16 AM
3,500 is my budget. I was afraid the mulch would runoff into the pool with a hard rain. Do you think it will be an issue?
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I really don't think this would be much of an issue. I have mulched a steeper hill a couple times before, and the mulch is all still there. It seems like it would have to flood for that to happen, and then you have other problems to worry about.

Rivervalleylawns
04-21-2010, 08:23 AM
I would for sure be pushing for a wall on the two fence sides. Even if its not that tall. Also a budget of 10+.
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pdenney11
04-21-2010, 11:03 AM
Yeah if I have someone do a wall on both sides I'd like to get her around a 8k-10k budget.
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land_scaper70
04-21-2010, 11:34 AM
I would do a corner wall going towards the slide and diving board, wall about 2 feet high and 10 feet long with a couple of columns on either end. Throw in some giant green arborvitae for privacy. What looks like a slide side some roses and soft texture stuff, red twig dogwoods spirea etc. Try to use a 1" to 1.5" river rock instead of the mulch. Would cost about an extra grand. There is my two cents.

northofeden
04-21-2010, 06:48 PM
Why don't you collect the boulders scattered about and build some outcropping/retention?
Creatively used it should be sufficient keep the mulch from washing.
You could add some stone within budget, I'd guess. Or if you need more offer as an upgrade for $x more, people like alternatives and use of existing materials
Then plant with some low evergreens such as j. procumbens, for coverage and some winter interest. The rest ground-cover, hydrangea's, etc. for color.
You're right about the mulch, it might wash into the pool. It seems like in never rains and then when it does it's raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock.

pdenney11
04-21-2010, 10:16 PM
I would do a corner wall going towards the slide and diving board, wall about 2 feet high and 10 feet long with a couple of columns on either end. Throw in some giant green arborvitae for privacy. What looks like a slide side some roses and soft texture stuff, red twig dogwoods spirea etc. Try to use a 1" to 1.5" river rock instead of the mulch. Would cost about an extra grand. There is my two cents.

Very nice, I appreciate the help. I might even be able to install a 2ft tall wall myself.

pdenney11
04-21-2010, 10:23 PM
Why don't you collect the boulders scattered about and build some outcropping/retention?
Creatively used it should be sufficient keep the mulch from washing.
You could add some stone within budget, I'd guess. Or if you need more offer as an upgrade for $x more, people like alternatives and use of existing materials
Then plant with some low evergreens such as j. procumbens, for coverage and some winter interest. The rest ground-cover, hydrangea's, etc. for color.
You're right about the mulch, it might wash into the pool. It seems like in never rains and then when it does it's raining like a cow pissing on a flat rock.

I will be keeping the existing boulders and using them in my design. Im going to go ahead and give her two plans. Both over her budget but she will have to deal with it or do the work herself.

"cow pissing on a flat rock" :laugh::laugh:

MulchMan88
04-27-2010, 10:34 PM
if your set on the wall idea but need to keep it cheap, maybe using 6x6s to make a wall? Arborvitaes would be good on the back side and some grasses to match the pool. both are low maintenance as well.

alf500series
05-02-2010, 06:03 PM
not sure if it is something you do or offer but i have had several clients who have paid me in installments for the proposed landscaping, or have just done the job in stages. just break it down for them and show how you will do each stage.
for example: do just the wall first, when they pay up to next stage fill behind wall and install sprinklers, etc. it gives people more flexibility and once they see things started it usually gets them of the crapper and they generally end up spending more than what your original bid was for anyways.

jlouki01
06-05-2010, 10:44 PM
Mulch always finds its way into the pool. Does the fence go all the way around?

NarNar
06-16-2010, 10:20 PM
For $3500 you aren't going to get much more then mulch and a few shrubs.

The armadillo is speaking the truth, you really are not going to get much for that price. The customer is asking you to do something, that might be setting you up to fall.

Sometime it is best to communicate to the customer that, the better decision is to wait until they have a bigger budget. Another suggestion is also building in stages. Trust the armadillo.

AGLA
06-17-2010, 07:07 AM
The problem is that someone wants something they can't afford. But more important than that is that they expect you to be the one who can make it affordable for them. That is not a business plan that is likely to get you very far.

NarNar
06-17-2010, 10:38 AM
The strength of this industry is word of mouth referral. Even if you were successful at achieving what the customer wants at the $3,500.00 (most likely not), that customer would refer you - Here are a few points to keep in mind.

1. You just completed a near impossible request; how much of a margin did you make? Was it worth the time?

2. If you completed the project, but the customer was not satisfied, they will blame you. Because you took the job and promised them you can do it- even when you know that it might not be possible. Now you have ruined a relationship for potential business and you wll be labeled as a contractor that CANNOT DELIVER.

3. You completed the project and it looks great, the customer will refer you, but trust me. You will be doing a lot of work for very little pay. In addition, you are undercutting other companies and ruining the market in your area. You work more, make less, and piss people off.... that can be your reputation.

Customers know what they want, and they want it at the lowest price. As a professional, you have to be the one to tell a customer it's not possible. Only bottom feeders say "YES," when the true answer is "NO."

NarNar
06-17-2010, 10:45 AM
The strength of this industry is word of mouth referral. Even if you were successful at achieving what the customer wants at the $3,500.00 (most likely not), that customer would refer you - Here are a few points to keep in mind.

1. You just completed a near impossible request; how much of a margin did you make? Was it worth the time?

2. If you completed the project, but the customer was not satisfied, they will blame you. Because you took the job and promised them you can do it- even when you know that it might not be possible. Now you have ruined a relationship for potential business and you wll be labeled as a contractor that CANNOT DELIVER.

3. You completed the project and it looks great, the customer will refer you, but trust me. You will be doing a lot of work for very little pay. In addition, you are undercutting other companies and ruining the market in your area. You work more, make less, and piss people off.... that can be your reputation.

Customers know what they want, and they want it at the lowest price. As a professional, you have to be the one to tell a customer it's not possible. Only bottom feeders say "YES," when the true answer is "NO."

Sorry, didn't mean to take your thread in a different direction.
Knowing the budget and what you are trying to achieve, I was suggesting maybe you open the dialogue with the customer and see if she is willing to give you a higher budget.

pdenney11
06-18-2010, 11:21 PM
Sorry, didn't mean to take your thread in a different direction.
Knowing the budget and what you are trying to achieve, I was suggesting maybe you open the dialogue with the customer and see if she is willing to give you a higher budget.

No problem. Thread was a few months old anyways and I had forgotten all about the job. In the beginning I was willing to work with them and help them out and we were going to take payments from this customer for 6 months. Then they kept wanting more, more, more and more. After I went over all the numbers for all the work they wanted I told them a price for just materials and the customers response was HOLY ****. I just told them to call me in the fall if they figure something out. After I explained all the work that goes into a job that size I think they realized it wasnt going to be a cheap project.