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shovelracer
04-26-2010, 06:25 PM
I have a situation that is new to me. Usually we are able to mount our transformers to flat strong surfaces IE foundation walls or garage. I need now to install a 30lb transformer against vinyl siding. I have 2 thoughts and wondered what the preferred method was. The homeowner would rather not cut up the siding because they want to take the system if they move???

One option would be to mount with 1/4" screws into the sheathing. There would be nylon spacers to keep the screws from pulling the box and crushing the siding.

The other option would be to cut out the siding and run J channel around it and mount directly to the sheathing.

I'm not huge on the idea of the transformer being out from the mounting surface, but they do this with sat dishes and they are fine. The Conduit will also be providing some unintentional support as well. Is there a better way?

Thanks

Classic Lighting
04-26-2010, 07:17 PM
I never mount to vinyl siding. IMO, a sheet of ply is not strong enough to support a trans. I would recommend installing a 4x4 a few inches off the building and attaching the trans to that.

shovelracer
04-26-2010, 07:43 PM
A post wont work, at this location. It is a raised portico inside corner and the location is the only spot that has the home automation line to the outside and also the only location that has a pass through utility hole. Garage would have been choosen, but the cost was prohibitive.

klkanders
04-26-2010, 08:02 PM
The J channel option could work if done properly or what about mounting an iron support to the foundation if possible similar to how ac units are hung on slopes?

RLI Electric
04-26-2010, 08:47 PM
I cant really visualize what you are doing but how about unistrut and spring nuts. Should easily hold hundreds of pounds.

S&MLL
04-26-2010, 09:38 PM
Give us a call and we will come hook it up.


We would never mount on siding. But if you had to just mount it. Get yourself some ledger locks and screw 1 into the stud. Remember under that plywood there are 2*6s or 2*4s.

http://www.fastenmaster.com/productdetails.aspx?catID=8&prodID=9


It holds up decks... It will hold up a trans.

ELumin8
04-27-2010, 12:54 AM
RLI Electric has the right suggestion. Mount it with galvanized strut, spring nuts & anchor bolts. You will get about 1-5/8 away from the house to allow for heat dissapation between the x-former and the siding.

David Gretzmier
04-27-2010, 02:15 AM
agreed. I do not mount directly on vinyl siding. trans can get hot.

Pro-Scapes
04-28-2010, 06:51 PM
They have a home automation system but the cost to remote mount the trans is prohibative ? Im wondering how the Portico will look with a transformer hanging on the wall inside of it.

Definatly no mounting to vinyl siding. Post mount... in grade or find another location.

Rememeber. Transformers should be obscured from view when possible. It really makes a difference in your overall installation. We are starting a project Monday where we needed have $600 in driveway bores and 120v work done today so we could keep the transformer out of this ladies prized garden. Her last contractor post mounted one smack in the middle of her roses.

S&MLL
04-28-2010, 09:02 PM
They have a home automation system but the cost to remote mount the trans is prohibative ? Im wondering how the Portico will look with a transformer hanging on the wall inside of it.

Definatly no mounting to vinyl siding. Post mount... in grade or find another location.

Rememeber. Transformers should be obscured from view when possible. It really makes a difference in your overall installation. We are starting a project Monday where we needed have $600 in driveway bores and 120v work done today so we could keep the transformer out of this ladies prized garden. Her last contractor post mounted one smack in the middle of her roses.


Were on the same page with this one

JoeyD
05-03-2010, 08:46 PM
I cant really visualize what you are doing but how about unistrut and spring nuts. Should easily hold hundreds of pounds.

X2 :clapping: :usflag:

irrig8r
05-03-2010, 10:57 PM
...Transformers should be obscured from view when possible. It really makes a difference in your overall installation. We are starting a project Monday where we needed have $600 in driveway bores and 120v work done today so we could keep the transformer out of this ladies prized garden. Her last contractor post mounted one smack in the middle of her roses.

I post mounted three in a customer's garden on a hill without much regard to how they might look in the winter when deciduous trees and shrubs were bare and some perennials had died back. Big mistake. I ate half the cost of moving them, including the GFIs.

Pro-Scapes
05-04-2010, 12:44 AM
I post mounted three in a customer's garden on a hill without much regard to how they might look in the winter when deciduous trees and shrubs were bare and some perennials had died back. Big mistake. I ate half the cost of moving them, including the GFIs.

I made the same mistake on my very first installation. Put the trans on the house behing a Lantana bush. Luckily the homeowner was great about me just adding some plantings.

Location Location Location!

Project I started today at a 4 million dollar estate had transformers mounted within view of the front entrance and pool area. Needless to say they are history now.

David Gretzmier
05-04-2010, 02:17 AM
I try to follow the rule of not being the first to clutter an area. once an area has a data distribution box, or a power meter, or an a/c condenser, telephone or cable distributor panel, I really have no problem joining that party on the wall, if it makes sense for a location, even if it is in view. I try to hide the trans if at all possible, but it does need power, it does need to be able to tell the difference between night and day, and it needs to make sense where you put it.

I give the customer a choice and let them vote with their dollars. if the box bothers them on a certain wall I am willing to discuss other choices and tell them the cost of putting it here or there. but I don't automatically assume a client will be ok with having an extra 500, 750 or whatever bucks in the bid for getting an outlet installed, and all the additional wire and labor to mount it around back by the pool pump.

I will cede the point the next person buying the house may not like the box where the previous homeowner was ok with it, but they ill also probably not like a dozen other choices that previous owner made and will pay to change them.

I just looked at a system replacement this evening with 2 trans ( non multi tap) mounted together but hundreds ( almost over 1000 feet to some fixtures) of feet away and running all lights on a 2 acre property. hiding trans can be taken a bit too far.

Pro-Scapes
05-04-2010, 07:51 PM
David, Installing at a service location such as near the meter is usually a good place for a trans. When I come across them 2 feet off a walkway in a shopping mall post mounted in plain view its bothersome.

I just used probably an extra spool of 10ga wire to mount a trans around the side of that 4 million dollar home just today. While the cost of the wire is high the finished project is that much cleaner looking.