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lawnmower man1
05-02-2010, 08:34 AM
Here in Knoxville, TN we are seeing a mulch shortage. The whole sale supplier says it is due to to the government allowing some company to buy all the bark and burn it instead of selling it to the mulch suppliers which has caused a shortage of black, and brown hardwood mulch. Also when they do receive more bark to sale he said the price is going to shoot up to double the price now or more. Are there other areas seeing this happen? What can we do about this?

minix
05-02-2010, 01:33 PM
Here in Knoxville, TN we are seeing a mulch shortage. The whole sale supplier says it is due to to the government allowing some company to buy all the bark and burn it instead of selling it to the mulch suppliers which has caused a shortage of black, and brown hardwood mulch. Also when they do receive more bark to sale he said the price is going to shoot up to double the price now or more. Are there other areas seeing this happen? What can we do about this?

Ground pallet mulch in black and brown ????

lawnmower man1
05-02-2010, 02:58 PM
Ground bark hardwood mulch black and brown.

STIHL GUY
05-02-2010, 04:33 PM
we have plenty here. i hope nothing like that will happen to this area

milkie62
05-03-2010, 12:22 AM
I wish we could buy it in my area for what some of you can buy it for.The cheapest I can get it for is $28-$30/yd and that is from a place that actually grinds it.I do not know how some are buying it for as low as $16.50/yd.We always get alot of tree damage here from storms so there is alot of mulch in my area.

DKJLawnCare
05-03-2010, 12:33 AM
Here in Knoxville, TN we are seeing a mulch shortage. The whole sale supplier says it is due to to the government allowing some company to buy all the bark and burn it instead of selling it to the mulch suppliers which has caused a shortage of black, and brown hardwood mulch. Also when they do receive more bark to sale he said the price is going to shoot up to double the price now or more. Are there other areas seeing this happen? What can we do about this?

Drive a little north. There is PLENTY of BLACK, BROWN and RED here in Clinton, and Lafollette

lawnmower man1
05-03-2010, 07:18 AM
Drive a little north. There is PLENTY of BLACK, BROWN and RED here in Clinton, and Lafollette

Is it good quality I bought some Saturday from a place in that area and was nasty the dye was running off as we put it down just not the quality I usually buy. I actually took it back and they give me refund.

LushGreenLawn
05-03-2010, 07:32 AM
The government allowed some company to buy it and burn it? Sounds like some conspiracy theory to me!

Really, if some company wanted to buy it and burn it, they may not need government approval. If their buying it, its their bark, but why would someone want to do that?

I think your mulch dealer fed you a line of BS. Theres plenty of mulch here too.

MarcSmith
05-03-2010, 07:50 AM
we have had suppliers be slow starting up this year as a result of all the snow in the winter time. but still plenty O mulch...just not as dark as it usually is...

lawnmower man1
05-03-2010, 07:51 AM
The government allowed some company to buy it and burn it? Sounds like some conspiracy theory to me!

Really, if some company wanted to buy it and burn it, they may not need government approval. If their buying it, its their bark, but why would someone want to do that?

I think your mulch dealer fed you a line of BS. Theres plenty of mulch here too.

I don't think so this is a large supplier not a little nursery there is usually thousands of yards of mulch on this yard and the last 2 times I had been there litteraly 20 to 30 brown and about 20 black and that was already promised to a nursery. My company has purchased well over 500cuys this spring This supplier supplies most of the nurseries in east TN. He had even give me a paper to read and a website to go to and complain. I think this is the real deal I have heard this from others also. When I find the paper I'll post it.

MarcSmith
05-03-2010, 08:16 AM
gotta keep in mind that wood and other products are burnt for the purposes of generating electricity... and while Iknow we hate to admit it, electricity is a bit more important than mulch...

its possible that the power company or whoever is burning it paid more than the mulch folks. or they found it was cheaper to burn it than strip the the bark and then grind it for mulch...

it's all about the $....

chris@perfectlawncare
05-05-2010, 01:15 AM
gotta keep in mind that wood and other products are burnt for the purposes of generating electricity... and while Iknow we hate to admit it, electricity is a bit more important than mulch...

its possible that the power company or whoever is burning it paid more than the mulch folks. or they found it was cheaper to burn it than strip the the bark and then grind it for mulch...

it's all about the $....
Put down rock and charge more :p
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ACMiller
05-06-2010, 11:02 AM
BioFuels Threaten Wood Fiber Supply for Mulch Producers
Submitted by jenniferm on Fri, 04/16/2010 - 11:10
in Market Place


We all are aware that wood fiber supplies are in lesser supply than in years past, due to a number of factors. The economic downturn, the lack of land clearing operations, and the demand for renewable energies have all eaten into the supply of fiber. An economic recovery should have a positive effect on the first two for mulch producers, but the demand for biofuels will remain a threat for years to come. One of the speakers at the Mulch and Soil Council’s annual meeting last October, Pete Stewart, the CEO of Forest2Market located in Charlotte, NC, gave some statistics regarding the push towards renewable energies and how it will affect the wood fiber supply.

Stewart pointed out that throughout the world, more and more demand for renewable fuels, such as wood pellets, is increasing the demand for wood fiber. He noted that the United Kingdom is targeting a rate of 20% of its fuel needs coming from renewable supplies by the year 2020. In order to reach this goal, it will need to import around 12 million tons of fuel pellets, at least a third of which will likely be imported from the United States. He also argues that, depending on the amount of fuel that is required to come from renewable sources in legislation pending in front of Congress today, demand for pellet fuel in the US may double in the next decade. The demand is expected to be around 60 million tons in 2012, but may reach a level of over 120 million tons by the year 2018. How will this doubling of wood fiber for fuel pellets be accomplished, and what will it do to fiber prices?

Stewart also notes that the current forestry management administrations do not seem to favor growing dedicated timber crops for only biofuel uses because it is expensive, time consuming, and is not guaranteed to be profitable. Better use of some of the green fiber currently discarded in many forestry processes will assist in closing this gap somewhat, but the bulk of the projected demanded wood will have to come from somewhere.