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View Full Version : lose or gain jobs due to contract?


sharpcuts
05-18-2010, 01:03 AM
OK, so I am just curious whether anyone has lost/gained jobs because of a contract. Sorry if that sounds confusing but here's the scenario.

I had a lady call last week to get a quote. They are an older couple, live in a middle class development, with a nice home. They, like many in this economy, lost much of their retirement in the stock markets. They are asking me to bid because they are currently in a contract with another company. Now here's the strange thing: they are completely happy with the guy that's doing it now! They just don't want a contract. Now the guy they currently have only does contracts, no exceptions. I, on the other hand, do both. I know that they probably won't save alot just because they aren't in a contract, but somehow they will feel more in control of their monthly expenses:dizzy:.

Just wondering if you have lost or gained any jobs because of this type of thing? Is this a trend we might see more of in our low economy?

unkownfl
05-18-2010, 01:05 AM
Be careful if you give them a by cut price that its good for weekly mowing@ bi weekly@ etc. Don't do a weekly price on an on call basis.

fiveoboy01
05-18-2010, 01:07 AM
In other words, they want a cheaper price. Don't be fooled about the "I just don't want a contract" BS.

This is how my residential agreements(I call them agreements not contracts) work... The customer signs, but can cancel at anytime with 2 weeks' notice, written or phone call.

Win-win situation. No arguing over the price because it's in writing, but the customer has an out.

sharpcuts
05-18-2010, 01:21 AM
yeah, I use the same kind of agreement. & I know not to charge the same for weekly & bi-weekly. My agreement spells out the schedule as well, & states that any less frequency there will be an up charge. I was up front with them that it would need a weekly mowing. They said something about the fact that they wouldn't have to pay through the winter without a contract. The way I figure it, it comes out the same either way unless my cut price is lower per time than the other guy's. I gave them the same price I would give anyone else. She wanted to look at some of my work, so I told her of a couple of jobs I do in the same sub. A lot of the older folks in my area don't like the idea of a contract for some reason. Prefer the handshake agreement thing they were used to I guess.

LandscapemanFL
05-18-2010, 01:26 AM
I have used them in the past. I just offer two different rates, Discounted for the contract/agreement and a little higher for the non. Most customers go for the no contract plan. I have had calls like yours, I dont understand the whole concept. But I am happy for the new customers.

topsites
05-18-2010, 02:56 AM
They, like many in this economy, lost much of their retirement in the stock markets.

That is not my problem, should have sold before the bubble burst then
they would have made out, we're talking 5 to 10 times the money invested.
Come to think of it, maybe they did sell.

They are asking me to bid because they are currently in a contract with another company.

Huh?
Finish the contract, then call me again.

Now here's the strange thing: they are completely happy with the guy that's doing it now! They just don't want a contract.

Ohhhh yeah, I catch the drift, time to run.

Now the guy they currently have only does contracts, no exceptions.

Good for him.

I, on the other hand, do both. I know that they probably won't save alot just because they aren't in a contract, but somehow they will feel more in control of their monthly expenses:dizzy:.

Forget it, I know full and well what all of that means, I'm outta here!

Just wondering if you have lost or gained any jobs because of this type of thing? Is this a trend we might see more of in our low economy?

All the time, case like this gladly so! :waving:

TheC-Master
05-18-2010, 09:01 AM
I like user agreements for residentials, provided they pay out for the month if they cancel. It helps keep things in order about what everyone agreed to. A must considering some customers have split personalities or something.

clydebusa
05-18-2010, 09:31 AM
Be careful if you give them a by cut price that its good for weekly mowing@ bi weekly@ etc. Don't do a weekly price on an on call basis.

My thoughts also.

lawnboy dan
05-18-2010, 09:44 AM
i have recently lost jobs to people who think its cheaper to go with a contract. the fools didnt bother to crunch the numbers

clydebusa
05-18-2010, 02:18 PM
In my case all my contract customers are cheaper than pay as you go. When I can schedule and count on mowing or doing whatever it is cheaper.

PPS.inc
05-18-2010, 05:46 PM
I have a contract stating price per cut and all the legalities that need to spelled out when your working on someone elses property. But what it boils down to is PIRCE PER CUT. Contract protects both parties.

lawnboy dan
05-18-2010, 09:36 PM
no contracts protect you and screw the customer.

sharpcuts
05-19-2010, 12:16 AM
I don't do on call mowing. No exceptions.

sharpcuts
05-19-2010, 01:03 AM
I was thinking about this today while mowing. I DO understand not wanting a contract. It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with trying to screw the LCO. I have to relate to my customers by thinking about what I like when I purchase something. Take the cellphone for instance. I HATE CELLPHONE CONTRACTS. CELL PHONE COMPANIES LOVE CONTRACTS. they have been begging me to sign a new contract constantly. Nothing doing. I am going a different route. I am sick of being screwed by verizon. Now I've had a cell since 1993. In that time I've only been with two companies. But no contract for me. I'll pay full price for the phone & then I am free to do whatever I want when they start getting too cocky. So, yes, I understand the no contract desire.