PDA

View Full Version : Pic of KBG lawn - need help Real Bad!


1966vette
05-18-2010, 07:14 PM
Enclosed are some pic of my 7 week old recently planted "elite" KBG lawn renovation project: Last weekend I added another $150 or 50# of KBG in the bare areas. Can you offer some advice?

Thanks!
Andy

mdlwn1
05-18-2010, 07:33 PM
Less fert...more water. Water to keep the seed (not the soil)moist at all times. You should have mixed some rye in with it...maybe 30% or so. KBG can take several weeks depending on variety and weather whereas the rye would germinate in a few days and help to shade the area quickly. The KBG would always dominate over time. Best to fert after the seed is 1 " or so.

EastCoast
05-18-2010, 08:07 PM
Rule of thumb would be to have no more than 20% Perennial Rye with your KBG, but the soil looks really dry.
I would apply some soil/compost over the new seeded area and keep the seed moist.
It there are no sprinklers, I would apply burlap to keep the seed moist for the first two weeks.
Posted via Mobile Device

RigglePLC
05-18-2010, 08:47 PM
Kentucky bluegrass is slow to establish. Cold soil and cool weather slows it down, even more. On a sod farm it takes about a year--they harvest the sod at about 18 months. Water every single day for 45 days. Fertilize about every 30 days with a fertilizer high in slow-release nitrogen. Ease up on the fert, when you cannot keep up with the mowing. Do not use quick release fert as it may result in nitrates in your well or ground water.

mdlwn1
05-18-2010, 08:53 PM
Kentucky bluegrass is slow to establish. Cold soil and cool weather slows it down, even more. On a sod farm it takes about a year--they harvest the sod at about 18 months. Water every single day for 45 days. Fertilize about every 30 days with a fertilizer high in slow-release nitrogen. Ease up on the fert, when you cannot keep up with the mowing. Do not use quick release fert as it may result in nitrates in your well or ground water.

He obv has a heavy hand...I wouldnt recommend expert level fert advice. To the OP focus on the water...the fert is not a big deal and will certainly harm the situation if the water is not what it needs to be. Like someone else said..If you have the opportunity to cover the seed somehow...

bigslick7878
05-18-2010, 09:14 PM
The soil looks like complete garbage.

Might want to start there. Try getting a few yards of top soil to add in. I would aerate too if possible beforehand.

After 7 weeks those results are nothing short of terrible, sorry.

You should have 95% coverage after almost 2 months.

If you want to do anything else do it fast before it starts getting hot.

ChiTownAmateur
05-19-2010, 12:24 PM
Too dry
too dry
TOO DRY!

Everything said above I think is valid. Very hard to grow just KBG (i am doing the same right now) in the springtime because when heavy rains come it washes the seed around and away potentially (like a few weeks ago when we got 1" a day and then 3" in a day after 3 days of 1" per).

My guess is that a combination of the heavy rains, combined with missing some watering cycles (or not watering enough) caused you to only get some germination.

Since the seed is already down there is not a lot to do with the soil.

You should cover the area with straw mulch (don't cover more than 50%) and pay a little more attention to watering on a very regular schedule.

ChiTownAmateur
05-19-2010, 12:26 PM
the lesson behind this imo is that the soil itself needed to be tilled up better or loosened more...the pictures make it look like hard ground, not ungrowable, but not ideal either.

aerating in fall will help with that...plan to do your best with what you have and then aearate and overseed with same kbg in fall, by spring you'll have a beautiful area

1966vette
05-19-2010, 06:19 PM
Guys,

Thanks for the comments!

Here is the story on the soil:

1. It was tilled, leveled, raked, seeded, rolled, fertilized & watered daily for almost 6 weeks. It is not great soil! I wish I had better soil! Unfortunately, sometimes you have to grow KBG on the soil you have, not on the soil you want to have.

2. It was water daily except 2 days before these photos were taken. I wanted to mow dry grass & apply more seed. I used a push mower to cut the 1 acre lot. Not a lot of fun! I then pulled a spike aerator w/ a ZTR to punch holes in the soil for the new seed w/o harming the new grass. This worked well on the dry soil and I have been watering daily ever since.

3. It was seed at 3# /1,000 sq ft. per the seed mfg recommendations. However, NOW the seed mfg has increased the recommend KBG to up to 6# / 1,000. I would have applied 6# of seed / 1,000 sq ft had I know!

4. I’m worried about the following:
1. weeds – how do I handle crab grass? I do plan to apply 2-4-D after the 3rd mowing.
2. KBG spread rate – it this lawn ever going to look good?
3. Cost – I applied 175# of the following “elite KBG seed at a cost of $700
4. Time – this project is going on way too long
Below is the type of KBG I planted.
9PSOD Premium Sod Blend (3 lb/1000 sq ft) ........................3.95+
25% NuDestiny Kentucky Bluegrass
15% Midnight Kentucky Bluegrass
25% Impact Kentucky Bluegrass
10% Bewitched Kentucky Bluegrass
25% Beyond Kentucky Bluegrass


What a fight!
Andy

mdlwn1
05-19-2010, 06:46 PM
Ok.....slow it down...you are over working the situation. I can't imagine after tilling that rolling was a good idea. Focus on the water...and the water only for now. Make a decision..do you want solid green?..or do you want a weed free lawn..trying to both is a more advanced skill level. There is a relatively narrow window of opportunity to make it alll come together in the spring. The fall is really the time things will work for you with little effort. Once seed has established...KBG will be fairly aggressive. Just give it water and time.

bigslick7878
05-20-2010, 12:00 AM
Guys,

Thanks for the comments!

Here is the story on the soil:

1. It is not great soil! I wish I had better soil! Unfortunately, sometimes you have to grow KBG on the soil you have, not on the soil you want to have.

What a fight!
Andy

Buy better soil. You can spend all the time and money you want on raking tilling etc etc but if the soil is garbage nothing will grow....as you can see.

About 4 yards will do the trick maybe even less.

foreplease
05-20-2010, 09:27 AM
Patience and water. Seven weeks before your original post is March 30? You're not that far south of me and here that is too early to expect consistent soil temps warm enough IMO. Guessing next 2 weeks you will see a big difference. Doubt you need any more seed. I don't know what you have done in terms of fertilizing but would agree to keep hitting it with slow release and don't worry about weeds for now.

bigslick7878
05-20-2010, 01:55 PM
Patience and water. Seven weeks before your original post is March 30? You're not that far south of me and here that is too early to expect consistent soil temps warm enough IMO. Guessing next 2 weeks you will see a big difference. Doubt you need any more seed. I don't know what you have done in terms of fertilizing but would agree to keep hitting it with slow release and don't worry about weeds for now.

The soil temp is around 62 right now, that is not the issue.

fl-landscapes
05-20-2010, 03:21 PM
the lesson behind this imo is that the soil itself needed to be tilled up better or loosened more...the pictures make it look like hard ground, not ungrowable, but not ideal either.

aerating in fall will help with that...plan to do your best with what you have and then aearate and overseed with same kbg in fall, by spring you'll have a beautiful area

Yup thats the first thing I noticed....the ground looks hard as a rock and the soil looks very poor in quality. Was it slit seeded or just seed thrown on the ground?

RigglePLC
05-20-2010, 10:02 PM
Foreplease has a good point. Soil was too cold when you planted. Slowed response. Now that the soil is warm, it should speed things up considerably. The seed you planted was excellent--sod quality. Don't panic--it just takes time--plus fert and water. I think I can see a couple clumps of perennial ryegrass in the foreground. (It is doing fine.)

You were right to let it dry for a day to make it easy to mow. Now start the water again.

I suspect the soil is adequate. Did you haul in bad soil or is the grass on the left established on the same soil?

foreplease
05-21-2010, 07:53 AM
The soil temp is around 62 right now, that is not the issue.

There are likely several issues that have contributed to his results so far. The rate of germination as well as the percent total germination are both affected by soil temperature, making it a factor. Determining what is responsible for results to date requires that we look not at today's conditions but at the range of conditions between the time the seed was sown and now.

I suspect the soil is adequate. Did you haul in bad soil or is the grass on the left established on the same soil?
So do I. Ideal, no. I doubt we could all even agree on what ideal is. Personally, I am not a big fan of top soil. If it can be incorporated before planting I can see how the overall soil texture would improve. Layers cause problems though.

1966vette: the rest of you lawn looks good, have you used any crabgrass pre-emergent this spring? If so, are you sure none of it got into this newly seeded area? You have enough of a start that your results are going to be fine eventually. Keep mowing it. That will help it thicken up. Its overall condition is going to turn for you soon. When it does, please post more photos.

ChiTownAmateur
05-21-2010, 10:35 AM
If you look at the pictures, it's really not that bad. One issue is simply that many plants are very small still and haven't come up fully and spread out a bit.

Right by the driveway is some of the nicest new grass, signaling that the temperature near the driveway when the sun hit it caused that area to germinate better than the others. (side view picture really captures this well)

I had the exact same situation where by the sidewalks the grass came up the fastest, so the comments that there was a slower germination is backed up by that evidence and the fact that I planted here in Chicago on the 4th of April and the typical 4 week germination has taken an additional 2-3 weeks.

It's really not that bad, yes it could be better. But with controlled watering and all that new seed it should fill in nicely this time around. With 80's in the forecast for the next few weeks make sure you are watering it well....you really should get some cover for it such as straw or some kind of mulch...because it's KBG it's going to take another 3-5 weeks to come up, and you need that area to stay moist...very hard to do without a cover (or enough established grass to act as cover)