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kirk1701
05-20-2010, 09:35 AM
Hey guys,
Had this posted in irrigation but got out of hand and was practically laughed out of the forum.

Here's the thread so I don't have to repost the pic's.
http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=315455&highlight=kirk1701

Bottom line, I've called planning and zoning, dept of water and even contacted a lawyer but for $150 per hour I might as we'll go ahead and put drains in on this side of the property now too. Thing is I need to know who to call, I don't know or need to know where to place the drains for maximum drainage?

Do landscapers do this type of work?

Creative Cuts
05-20-2010, 08:51 PM
we couldn't pour a driveway because the neighbor said the 3 24" drain pipes weren't sufficient to handle the water our drive blocked, so he should have to fix the problem
but that don't help much

kirk1701
05-21-2010, 08:31 AM
Yea we had that problem too, neighbor "ABOVE" us is built up un a hill besides being uphill from us and her rain gutters are pointed toward us on that side. We put a bumper down our side of the driveway because it kept washing out the driveway. However, the landscape is pitched toward the back of the house not toward the road :cry:

Nothing I could do there that's the developers fault 35 years ago.

OK maybe time for some pics so you guys get an idea whats going on.

These in the other thread as you can see is what happened at the back of the garage:
http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=3546825&postcount=3
Also what I did to correct is and the results because we seen the forecast with 10+ inches of rain heading our way to this resolved the problem of the drainage from the neighbors rain gutters and all the neighbors above her which drains onto us. ALONG with all of this:
http://www.lawnsite.com/showpost.php?p=3549709&postcount=37

What I've done since which I don't have pic's of yet is built up the back side of my garden to keep it from ever washing out again since the landscape of the property is also pitched back toward the garage so any water draining off the field or the back of my garden will also be channeled toward the drain you see in the pic above.

Now what's not in the other thread before the guys in irrigation started making a big joke out of my situation are the pic's of the problem I still have. From the other side of the garden down to the property line the water is blocked. Neighbor has constructed literally a foundation of a house 25 to 30 feet long right in the low area where the water is suppose to drain down on her, this is the results.

http://img121.imageshack.us/img121/6968/img0241b.jpg

http://img263.imageshack.us/img263/9076/img0242e.jpg

kirk1701
05-24-2010, 11:17 AM
Bump

Did this get overlooked?

Kiril
05-24-2010, 11:32 AM
Get rid of the damn plastic!

kirk1701
05-24-2010, 11:35 AM
Get rid of the damn plastic!

Not plastic Kiril, just landscaping paper which water goes through.

Kiril
05-24-2010, 12:16 PM
Not plastic Kiril, just landscaping paper which water goes through.

Get rid of that crap too.

kirk1701
05-24-2010, 12:21 PM
Get rid of that crap too.

That's what prevents the weeds from coming up through the pine bark.

We have the white stone all the way around the house and for 10 years now maintenance free. :)

Kiril
05-24-2010, 12:33 PM
That's what prevents the weeds from coming up through the pine bark.

We have the white stone all the way around the house and for 10 years now maintenance free. :)

That geotextile is junk. IMO, the only time I would consider using a geotextile (a high quality one) is with rock, and only for the purpose of keeping it separated from the soil for easier removal should that be desired at some later point in time. That cheap big box stuff will not achieve that goal.

The effectiveness of geotextile used as a weed block decreases dramatically with time, and with anything other than rock, it not only is a waste of money, but detrimental to your soil health. You would be better off with 3" of mulch, be it compost, chip, straw, whatever you use for that purpose in your area.

kirk1701
05-24-2010, 12:42 PM
That geotextile is junk. IMO, the only time I would consider using a geotextile (a high quality one) is with rock, and only for the purpose of keeping it separated from the soil for easier removal should that be desired at some later point in time. That cheap big box stuff will not achieve that goal.

The effectiveness of geotextile used as a weed block decreases dramatically with time, and with anything other than rock, it not only is a waste of money, but detrimental to your soil health. You would be better off with 3" of mulch, be it compost, chip, straw, whatever you use for that purpose in your area.

Kiril, no offence here bud so don't take it the wrong way. The landscaping paper is beside the point, see my original post

Thing is I need to know who to call, I don't know or need to know where to place the drains for maximum drainage?

Do landscapers do this type of work?

Landscaping paper or no landscaping paper my bark is going to get washed downhill unless I drain the runoff to the street. :usflag:

Kiril
05-24-2010, 12:48 PM
The landscaping paper is beside the point, see my original post

Is it? Is the infiltration rate of the fabric higher or lower than the soil it is sitting on?

kirk1701
05-24-2010, 12:51 PM
Is it? Is the infiltration rate of the fabric higher or lower than the soil it is sitting on?

No, water goes through it.

Oh and by the way I set out more honeysukles over the weekend :drinkup:
I just had to throw that in there for you.

Kiril
05-24-2010, 12:58 PM
No, water goes through it.

That was not the question. The question was how fast does water move through the fabric compared to the soil.

Oh and by the way I set out more honeysukles over the weekend

Good for you. Doesn't matter one bit to me if you take my advise or not. You are the one who will have to deal with the headache, not me.

kirk1701
05-24-2010, 02:20 PM
That was not the question. The question was how fast does water move through the fabric compared to the soil.



Good for you. Doesn't matter one bit to me if you take my advise or not. You are the one who will have to deal with the headache, not me.

I'm just screwing with you man take it easy. :drinkup:

kemco
05-24-2010, 11:43 PM
May not be the exact answer you are looking for, not really even an answer but this is what I did and it worked. I had a similar situation in my back yard... im the lowest house on the street. So about 2 1/2 acres of yards above me drain directly into my back yard, or at least did.

Last summer I put in a two-level drain system with 3" pvc. I dropped 3 intake drains at the higher end of my back yard (idea was to catch a majority of water before it had a chance to wash away the rest of my backyard), then I put an additional 3 drains perpendicular to these but close to the back of my house for what the first three missed and what water drained from my yard. Plus one additional drain where some water always pooled. Ran all the pipe to the street about 50 feet away under my side-front yard which had the greatest down-slope. It has worked great. I dont really even notice the drain grates being there. I have no pooling of water now. Hardest thing was cutting through a mess of large tree roots. I did it by hand but in retrospect shouldve rented a ditchwitch from HD for about $140 for 3 hrs. It took me and one of my crew two days to dig it out for a total of about 120 feet of 3" pvc.

I knew I had no underground utilities in my way because I called and had them marked out when I put a new water service on my house a few years ago. I just made sure I had a good drop in the pipes, and buried them all about 15". The I re-leved my back yard, hauled in some additional dirt to do that. I wasnt aware of having to call anyone with the exception of having underground utilities marked and as I said I already knew where these were.

kirk1701
05-25-2010, 12:44 AM
May not be the exact answer you are looking for, not really even an answer but this is what I did and it worked. I had a similar situation in my back yard... im the lowest house on the street. So about 2 1/2 acres of yards above me drain directly into my back yard, or at least did.

Last summer I put in a two-level drain system with 3" pvc. I dropped 3 intake drains at the higher end of my back yard (idea was to catch a majority of water before it had a chance to wash away the rest of my backyard), then I put an additional 3 drains perpendicular to these but close to the back of my house for what the first three missed and what water drained from my yard. Plus one additional drain where some water always pooled. Ran all the pipe to the street about 50 feet away under my side-front yard which had the greatest down-slope. It has worked great. I dont really even notice the drain grates being there. I have no pooling of water now. Hardest thing was cutting through a mess of large tree roots. I did it by hand but in retrospect shouldve rented a ditchwitch from HD for about $140 for 3 hrs. It took me and one of my crew two days to dig it out for a total of about 120 feet of 3" pvc.

I knew I had no underground utilities in my way because I called and had them marked out when I put a new water service on my house a few years ago. I just made sure I had a good drop in the pipes, and buried them all about 15". The I re-leved my back yard, hauled in some additional dirt to do that. I wasnt aware of having to call anyone with the exception of having underground utilities marked and as I said I already knew where these were.

Pretty much the same thing I'm doing kemco, the drain at the higher end of my property is already in as the pic's show. I've now dammed up some of the backyard to keep water from draining across our garden and its pitched toward the drain so that takes care of another 50% of the drainage off my yard. The other 50% I should now be OK as what falls straight down my property should be able to soak up but there's always that one time with 3" rain fall in two hours that would hurt and do damage so like you, I want to put in the second drain system at the lower side of the property.

I think I know where to put the drains should go but I'm not 100% sure so I'm looking to get a second opinion from someone and possible have them dig the ditch to the street I just need to find out who to call, landscapers or someone else?

kemco
05-25-2010, 12:52 AM
You may want to check with an irrigation installation company in your area. They probably have something like a ditchwitch or trencher. I know some landscaping companies do this as well, we do on occasion but it's not our primary line of landscaping work by any means.

kirk1701
05-26-2010, 03:32 PM
That was not the question. The question was how fast does water move through the fabric compared to the soil.



Good for you. Doesn't matter one bit to me if you take my advise or not. You are the one who will have to deal with the headache, not me.

OK back to you kiril

Tell yu what bud, I have about a yard of the bark left from the project and I've already started cutting the landscaping timbers and laying out a design on both sides of my shed. I round-up the grass Monday night and I was going to lay the landscaping paper this weekend and put the pine bark down.

BUT!!!!
I'll do it your way and fore-go using any landscaping paper if your willing enough to tell me how to make this as maintenance free and weed free as it would be with the landscaping paper?

And if I do it your way and your wrong deal is you come fix it; deal????:drinkup:

Akita
05-26-2010, 09:47 PM
Why not do a lasagna method in lieu of geotextile fabric? At least then, you are going to give back nutrients to your soil. The more organic you can go, the better I say. Although, it's a matter of preference, I'd go with Cedar or Cypress(maybe more so Cedar to not contribute to the over harvesting of this) mulch.

kirk1701
05-26-2010, 11:50 PM
Why not do a lasagna method in lieu of geotextile fabric? At least then, you are going to give back nutrients to your soil. The more organic you can go, the better I say. Although, it's a matter of preference, I'd go with Cedar or Cypress(maybe more so Cedar to not contribute to the over harvesting of this) mulch.

We'll as I've said, it was all left over from a big project. I ordered 8 yards of the pine bark and the reason I used the pine bark was it's a natural accidicizer. The area I used it is all lined with holly bushes. There are pic's here in Landscape Maintenance of the whole project

Kiril
05-27-2010, 09:18 AM
Tell yu what bud, I have about a yard of the bark left from the project and I've already started cutting the landscaping timbers and laying out a design on both sides of my shed. I round-up the grass Monday night and I was going to lay the landscaping paper this weekend and put the pine bark down.

BUT!!!!
I'll do it your way and fore-go using any landscaping paper if your willing enough to tell me how to make this as maintenance free and weed free as it would be with the landscaping paper?

Good for you. However, if you think that putting the same amount of bark there as you did on the geotextile is going to cut it you are sadly mistaken. Maintain a 3" layer of bark and the vast majority of your weeds will not be a problem.

BTW, I don't like the lasagna method either. Too labor intensive and I don't like the way it handles water, that is, unless your planning on using SDI.

And if I do it your way and your wrong deal is you come fix it; deal????:drinkup:

Great. You pay for my travel expenses, boarding, and beer and you have a deal. :laugh:

kirk1701
05-27-2010, 10:06 AM
BTW, I don't like the lasagna method either. Too labor intensive and I don't like the way it handles water, that is, unless your planning on using SDI.
You've lost me here Kiril, lasagna method?? SDI???

Your talking language over my head as I'm not in the business

Much the same as me saying create a VPN on the server and run it through port 443 so it's protected by the firewall :laugh:
Were in different line of business so of course were not going to understand each other's acronyms

Great. You pay for my travel expenses, boarding, and beer and you have a deal. :laugh:
Oh no, no travel expenses but you can stay here and I'll buy the beer plenty of room and great hospitality :drinkup:

Kiril
05-27-2010, 10:17 AM
Oh no, no travel expenses but you can stay here and I'll buy the beer plenty of room and great hospitality :drinkup:

What does a virtual private network have anything to do with landscaping? Yea, I know a little something about computers too. Actually, I just built two new boxes. :)

kirk1701
05-27-2010, 10:25 AM
What does a virtual private network have anything to do with landscaping? Yea, I know a little something about computers too.

My point being I didn't understand a word you said, but thats OK your skipping around the question like a Nancy Pelosi politician and I can see now you just want an argument.

I don't much care for argumentments or being flamed so I won't reply again. I've tried to be nice and several times you've been a donkey about it.

Kiril
05-27-2010, 10:32 AM
My point being I didn't understand a word you said, but thats OK your skipping around the question like a Nancy Pelosi politician and I can see now you just want an argument.

1) I didn't bring up lasagna mulching .... and even if I did, make use of your computer skills and google it.

2) SDI = subsurface drip irrigation

I've tried to be nice and several times you've been a donkey about it.

Perhaps ... or maybe not. You have been on this site for what .... 4 years .... and myself and others have given you much solid advice, and you ignore most of it. So what exactly is it you want here? Personally I think your whole feud with the neighbor is idiotic. Deal with your drainage issues on your property and ignore her.