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ukcats
05-22-2010, 08:21 PM
Just curious how many people actually use the regular trailer tires or buy automobile tires?

grassman177
05-22-2010, 09:07 PM
we buy 10 ply trailer tires, they are tougher and last longer from punctures, but they are not cheap

FYS777
05-22-2010, 10:12 PM
i use regular tires, you can buy three sets for the price of one here. and usually i can get three seasons out of one set. but you have to know i have a load of lawn mowing equipment, one trailer 16 foot, one trailer 12 foot!!! about 300 hundred miles a week using auto tires. my trailers are both double axle.

topsites
05-22-2010, 10:35 PM
we buy 10 ply trailer tires, they are tougher and last longer from punctures, but they are not cheap

Wow...

I try and remember to ALWAYS consider the labor cost in the replacement!
Even if the tire costs 2x as much and it only lasts 2x as long it might still be better seeing how it only has to be installed once?

That and the tougher tires usually last a lot longer than 2x

MS_SURVEYOR
05-23-2010, 12:35 AM
Trailer tires are rated for heavier loads, and stay cooler under load. They last longer.

Richard Martin
05-23-2010, 05:06 AM
I have Goodyear Marathon 225/75R15 tires on my tandem axle 16' trailer. They're not that expensive given how long they last.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Marathon+Radial

MikeKle
05-23-2010, 08:34 AM
Ive always used the automotive tires on all my trailers, usually the really used ones too, without hardly any tread on them, and never had any problems, but the maximum I haul is 3 WBs, so thats not alot of weight, but if you are hauling more than that regularly, you will need real trailer tires. I have more problems picking up nails, glass, etc, and have to plug my trailer tires all the time!!

outlaw1960
05-23-2010, 09:43 AM
I have Goodyear Marathon 225/75R15 tires on my tandem axle 16' trailer. They're not that expensive given how long they last.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Goodyear&tireModel=Marathon+Radial

I have the same tires on my trailer, on my thrd season and they still look new.

Gruneich Lawn Care, Inc.
05-23-2010, 09:08 PM
I run Maxxis M8008. I have a couple 26' enclosed trailers loaded with 3 riders and more hand held equipment than I care for. Usually get about 4 seasons out of them. Roughly 400 miles a week

mbrew
05-24-2010, 04:36 PM
Ive always used the automotive tires on all my trailers, usually the really used ones too, without hardly any tread on them, and never had any problems, but the maximum I haul is 3 WBs, so thats not alot of weight, but if you are hauling more than that regularly, you will need real trailer tires. I have more problems picking up nails, glass, etc, and have to plug my trailer tires all the time!!

Light Truck (LT) and multi ply trailer tires are much more resistant to puncture than car tires (P series). I did have a flat on my truck the other day, the first in 5 years, but with the lousy places I go I would have constant problems with P series tires. I'm in and out of dumps and metal recycling places every week.

Mike

360ci
05-29-2010, 08:44 AM
I run a set of 205/70R15 tires on my smaller 4x8 utility. I rarely load it over 2500lbs on a good day with mulch and the like. Tires are XL rated for a few extra hundred pounds each at max pressure. Last set lasted me ten years. I think it all depends in the application. If I had a trailer with a couple ZTRs and other heavier equipment and ran it all day every day then 10 ply trailer tires would be my choice as well, unless I can get a better deal on E rated truck tires (commercial brand), which are just as good but can be more expensive.

Richard Martin
05-29-2010, 09:45 AM
One of the biggest, and probably most important, differences between trailer and any other tire is the constuction. It's not the plies or tread depth or weight carrying capacity. Trailer tires are designed to withstand a lot of torsional rotation.

A tandem axle trailer will drag either the front, rear or both tires across the road everytime you make a turn. And the tighter the turn the harder it is on tires. Trailer tires are designed to absorb all of the twisting. Regular truck and passenger car tires will often fail when subjected to these loads too many times. If you have a tandem trailer and it tend to either wear the fronts or rears quicker than the other tires then you need to rebalance your load or raise or lower the draw bar to get the wear balanced. When the wear is balanced with a slight forward weight bias then the trailer is set up prefectly.