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LarryF
05-26-2010, 02:56 PM
I'm not sure whether to post this here or in the power-washing forum, but I'm not in business, just another homeowner so I'll start here. I expect this will be moved if I made the wrong choice.

I'm sure the unit I want should put out 3000 psi or perhaps more, but I noticed when looking at the latest Northern catalog that engine HP is not identified any more. I presume the manufacturer will match GPM and PSI with an appropriated size engine, but it would be nice to know approximately what it is in HP. My previous experience was with a 3000 psi unit that had a 10 HP B&S. I've not had problems with it, but it's pretty old now, and I doubt if it's still being manufactured any more. The ones I'm looking at provided by Northern seem to all have a GX160 OHV Honda engine. If anyone knows what that translates to in HP, would you share it with me?

And if you are really into this pressure washing topic, Northern has a couple of units that use the name "Powerhorse" that look like they might be a great bargain, but I don't know anything about them.
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_pressure-washers+powerhorse+gas-cold-water

They don't specify the engine or the pump manufacturers, but going by reviews in the above web site, most of those who bought it seem satisfied. I'd like to have your comments on these as well.

Thanks

twobroslawns
05-26-2010, 04:29 PM
160 cc will be 5.5 hp. The powerhorse untis are knock off hondas I believe. Look at the website under engine oil capacity and this will tell you about those engines. Last time I remember lloking it was something like .17 quart. Our 5.5 honda engine (on a mower) holds just over .5 quarts and our GX390 13 hp on our pressure washer holds signifacantly more.

To me, PSI isn't important. Others may disagree, but I think GPM is more important. Like the 200mph blowers at homedepot that don't move anything and the Stihl 150 mph blowers that move tons of leaves - its CFM that matters. Our 13 hp has 3750 psi and 4.0gpm

LarryF
05-26-2010, 05:38 PM
160 cc will be 5.5 hp. The powerhorse untis are knock off hondas I believe. Look at the website under engine oil capacity and this will tell you about those engines. Last time I remember lloking it was something like .17 quart. Our 5.5 honda engine (on a mower) holds just over .5 quarts and our GX390 13 hp on our pressure washer holds signifacantly more.

To me, PSI isn't important. Others may disagree, but I think GPM is more important. Like the 200mph blowers at homedepot that don't move anything and the Stihl 150 mph blowers that move tons of leaves - its CFM that matters. Our 13 hp has 3750 psi and 4.0gpm

Thanks! 5.5 HP doesn't sound like very much for a pressure washer. I'm going to do a bit more research before I leap.

Anyone else want to make a suggestion?

Brian E
05-26-2010, 06:20 PM
First, let me say I am just an average homeowner who uses his pressure washer a half dozen times a year.
With that said, I bought this one at Sams Club and have been very happy with it.

http://www.blackmaxtools.com/catalog/pressure_washers/BM80915

LarryF
05-26-2010, 06:32 PM
Even worse than I thought! According to this web site which shows the power curves:

http://www.honda-engines.com/engines/gx620.htm

the GX160 is only 4.8 HP and the GX390 is 11.7 HP. Maybe that's why the HP ratings are no longer provided in the pressure-washer ads. However, they both do have a 3-year commercial warranty.

LarryF
05-29-2010, 12:55 PM
To me, PSI isn't important. Others may disagree, but I think GPM is more important. Like the 200mph blowers at homedepot that don't move anything and the Stihl 150 mph blowers that move tons of leaves - its CFM that matters. Our 13 hp has 3750 psi and 4.0gpm

I don't disagree that the GPM figure is important, but the PSI one is too, of course. For instance, you can get 5 GPM out of a garden hose without a nozzle, but without something to boost the pressure, you won't be able to do much with it. I presume that's why they call these things pressure washers. It looks like my choice will be this one.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100644535
The price doesn't seem bad to me considering the one I have now was purchased in 1998 for about $700, has a 10 HP B&S engine and puts out 3.5 GPM and 3000 PSI. It still runs and works well, but the new one will be for a son-in-law who has borrowed mine in the past and now had decided to get his own and asked my help in picking one out. This one is a couple of hundred bucks more, but it's 12 years later and the unit has an 11.7 HP commercial Honda engine and boasts 3800 PSI and 4 GPM. That'll be my advice, but if someone has a better suggestion, I'd like to hear it.

twobroslawns
05-29-2010, 08:27 PM
Oh ya, thats a good one. Gooooooood choice:):):):clapping::clapping:

PierreCiCi
05-29-2010, 08:44 PM
Pressure-washers are based on cleaning units. Example: 2000PSI @ 5GPM is 10,000 cleaning units. Cleaning Units = Pressure X GPM. It doesn't really matter how you achieve the Cleaning Units, pressure or gpm. The higher the Cleaning Units the better. In other words: 3000PSI @ 6GPM is better than 5000PSI @ 3GPM. I run two commercial unit that each have 3500PSI, but one is 7.5GPM and the other is 13.5GPM. Believe me when I say the 13.5GPM machine is tough to hold. It is mainly used for surface cleaning and rinsing. Hopefully I didn't confuse anyone too much.

LarryF
05-29-2010, 10:47 PM
Pressure-washers are based on cleaning units. Example: 2000PSI @ 5GPM is 10,000 cleaning units. Cleaning Units = Pressure X GPM. It doesn't really matter how you achieve the Cleaning Units, pressure or gpm. The higher the Cleaning Units the better. In other words: 3000PSI @ 6GPM is better than 5000PSI @ 3GPM. I run two commercial unit that each have 3500PSI, but one is 7.5GPM and the other is 13.5GPM. Believe me when I say the 13.5GPM machine is tough to hold. It is mainly used for surface cleaning and rinsing. Hopefully I didn't confuse anyone too much.

Excellent point, PierreCiCi! And this chart is someone else's guideline of how many cleaning units are needed for various applications. Since you seem to be into this topic more than others, perhaps you will comment on it. I happen to think one should have a lot more than 5000 CUs to clean sidewalks and patio pavers, but I'm confident that the one I picked out, which will provide about 15000 CUs, will do that with ease.

PierreCiCi
05-29-2010, 11:09 PM
I only do sidewalks. Retail shopping centers. I started out with a 3500 psi/5.7 gpm unit about 8 years ago. The problem that I quickly ran into was not having enough volume to rinse after surface cleaning. That extra water volume makes a big difference. If you're only doing residential or your own home, you should be fine with the 15000 CUs machine.

I don't have any experience on the units that Northern sells. I'm runing Kohler engines (38hp and 23hp) and General pumps on my units. The large unit is cold water only and the smaller one is hot/cold. The hot water is for the gum on sidewalks @ shopping centers. One other thing to note. Once you start going over about 18000 CUs the price starts jumping.

twobroslawns
05-29-2010, 11:21 PM
Yes, pierre is right in everything he says.

Where in Atlanta are you? we operate in cobb.

If you are really into getting fast, you should look into a surface cleaner before a really big unit. You can get cheapo ones at Home depot, but your machine will most likely need a commercial rated cleaner. We use a 24 inch whisper washer and it makes surfaces (which is all we do) go soooo much faster. Instead of cleaning with a snall nozzle, you are cutting a 24 inch swath.

PierreCiCi
05-29-2010, 11:39 PM
We are located in North Buckhead, but work all over metro Atlanta.

LarryF-One other note: Make sure you have the right size tips for your wand and surface cleaner. Too small or too big and you will not get the most out of your machine.

twobroslawns
05-30-2010, 07:06 PM
North Buckhead. Hmmmm. Pretty close. You know where Westminster Schools is?

Yes be sure if you lose your tips get the right kind. They have small numbers on them that you should match with new ones (I think the numbers are in the 4.0-5.5 range. Higher the # more pressure less volume. You don't want to get ones too small or ou'll hurt the pump.

PierreCiCi
05-30-2010, 08:44 PM
North Buckhead. Hmmmm. Pretty close. You know where Westminster Schools is?

Yes be sure if you lose your tips get the right kind. They have small numbers on them that you should match with new ones (I think the numbers are in the 4.0-5.5 range. Higher the # more pressure less volume. You don't want to get ones too small or ou'll hurt the pump.
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PierreCiCi
05-30-2010, 08:46 PM
Yes. I grew up in Atlanta. I went to Atlanta public schools in the 60s and 70s.
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PierreCiCi
05-30-2010, 08:47 PM
Do you maintain that property?
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drumz2129
06-01-2010, 09:23 AM
I don't disagree that the GPM figure is important, but the PSI one is too, of course. For instance, you can get 5 GPM out of a garden hose without a nozzle, but without something to boost the pressure, you won't be able to do much with it. I presume that's why they call these things pressure washers. It looks like my choice will be this one.
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100644535
The price doesn't seem bad to me considering the one I have now was purchased in 1998 for about $700, has a 10 HP B&S engine and puts out 3.5 GPM and 3000 PSI. It still runs and works well, but the new one will be for a son-in-law who has borrowed mine in the past and now had decided to get his own and asked my help in picking one out. This one is a couple of hundred bucks more, but it's 12 years later and the unit has an 11.7 HP commercial Honda engine and boasts 3800 PSI and 4 GPM. That'll be my advice, but if someone has a better suggestion, I'd like to hear it.

I can second the recommendation on that unit. It is the same motor and triplex pump as the one I have.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_248625-348-020297_4294857324_4294937087?productId=3028001&Ns=p_product_price|1&pl=1&currentURL=/pl_Pressure%2BWashers_4294857324_4294937087_?newSearch=true$ddkey=http:SearchCatalogDisplay
The rest is just the frame and packaging. I have had mine for a little over 2 years now and have had no issues with it. One thing I would recommend is the use of a pump saver after each use since it will only be used every once in a while. It will keep mineral deposits from forming in the pump, lubricate the rings, and keep the pump from freezing in cold weather. My grandpa's pump (similar pump on a Briggs I/C) was 4 years old and the pressure adjustment seized up from mineral deposits. We were able to free it and replace a few broken parts. Since then he has also used the pump saver and had no issues.

FiveOJoe
06-01-2010, 09:30 AM
I bought that Ridgid 13hp Honda 3800PSI 4GPM. Broken box sale, for $500. It's a beast, heavy, but a monster. I need ramps to get it into my pickup.

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/400/30/305c5198-b0b4-4111-89ee-4bce5e8fdf70_400.jpg

biggziff
06-01-2010, 10:33 AM
I'm not sure how you're coming to the conclusions you mention, but I can speak from my experience only. I have had 3 pressure washers. One was an electric unit from Harbor freight which worked very well. I pressure washed the following with it:
My house siding, brick work, sidewalks (200' of it), 25 X 35 wooden deck, side walls of our above ground pool, various motorcycles and other vehicles, etc. I gave it to my father in law 5 years ago and he uses it frequently. I think I paid $59 for it originally. The 2 gas engine powered units are 2000 PSI and 3 GPM. They have 5.5 HP Honda engines on them. They are more than powerful enough for anything I'll ever use them for including all the things I mentioned earlier. I've used them to clean my ASV SR80 tracked skid steer for 5 years and they have never had an issue. I cannot imagine why a homeowner would need more pressure or GPM unless they just have a "bigger is better" mentality...which I understand (hence me owning the SR80)

Point is...I believe the box store 2000-2500 PSI units are perfectly serviceable for 95% of users (especially homeowners) and you're probably reaching a point of diminishing returns when buying anything much larger for non-commercial use.

LarryF
06-01-2010, 12:36 PM
I bought that Ridgid 13hp Honda 3800PSI 4GPM. Broken box sale, for $500. It's a beast, heavy, but a monster. I need ramps to get it into my pickup.

http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/400/30/305c5198-b0b4-4111-89ee-4bce5e8fdf70_400.jpg

That was a real bargain, Joe. You may not be able to even pay that little for just the engine. Same one I picked out for my son-in-law, but I don't think he has ordered it yet. Did you get it from HD? The reason I'm curious is that when I asked HD about it, I was told it can be only gotten by ordering it. Where in NJ are you? Maybe there's a store that has some more it would like to get rid of. If so, I'd like to pay them a visit.

I'm not sure how you're coming to the conclusions you mention, but I can speak from my experience only. I have had 3 pressure washers. One was an electric unit from Harbor freight which worked very well. I pressure washed the following with it:
My house siding, brick work, sidewalks (200' of it), 25 X 35 wooden deck, side walls of our above ground pool, various motorcycles and other vehicles, etc. I gave it to my father in law 5 years ago and he uses it frequently. I think I paid $59 for it originally. The 2 gas engine powered units are 2000 PSI and 3 GPM. They have 5.5 HP Honda engines on them. They are more than powerful enough for anything I'll ever use them for including all the things I mentioned earlier. I've used them to clean my ASV SR80 tracked skid steer for 5 years and they have never had an issue. I cannot imagine why a homeowner would need more pressure or GPM unless they just have a "bigger is better" mentality...which I understand (hence me owning the SR80)

Point is...I believe the box store 2000-2500 PSI units are perfectly serviceable for 95% of users (especially homeowners) and you're probably reaching a point of diminishing returns when buying anything much larger for non-commercial use.
You could be right! The chart I showed in Post 9 is the opinion of one person who I suspect is more experience than most in this field, and I wouldn't be surprised if 95 percent of all pressure-washer use fit into the light- or medium-duty applications shown there. But for me, it's "bigger is faster" rather than "bigger is better", and I suspect the one I have my eye on will continue to be in service years after cheaper ones would have been carted off to the junk yard. I also feel that way about lawn equipment, which is why I'm a homeowner with a commercial ZTR.

drumz2129
06-02-2010, 08:59 AM
You could be right! The chart I showed in Post 9 is the opinion of one person who I suspect is more experience than most in this field, and I wouldn't be surprised if 95 percent of all pressure-washer use fit into the light- or medium-duty applications shown there. But for me, it's "bigger is faster" rather than "bigger is better", and I suspect the one I have my eye on will continue to be in service years after cheaper ones would have been carted off to the junk yard. I also feel that way about lawn equipment, which is why I'm a homeowner with a commercial ZTR.

Bigger = Faster = Better. More time to do other things.

When deciding on which one to get, look at it this way. Most the cheaper homeowner units have a vertical shaft Briggs motor, usually a 675 series, which is mostly known as a cheap push mower engine. They also use a non-serviceable pump. When you look at the higher grade units, they use a horizontal shaft engine that is usually of a higher quality, and they use 3 piston pumps of a much higher quality that are easily rebuild-able, if ever needed.

Some people prefer to buy equipment, never change the oil/air filter/blades and run it until it wont run any more. They then put it by the road and go buy a new one. This may get them 5-10 years out of a piece of equipment, which some are happy with. I prefer to buy once, take care of it, and have it last forever.

Just because it can make 3800PSI doesn't mean that you have to run it at that pressure. For most stuff like cleaning brick/vinyl siding/concrete I only turn the pressure to about 2/3, otherwise it tends to remove the color from the brick, take up pieces of concrete, or blow holes in the vinyl - not good. It is also easier on the pump and motor which makes them last longer. When I need to remove flaking paint or heavy grime I have the pressure available to blast it off.

LarryF
06-02-2010, 10:49 AM
Bigger = Faster = Better. More time to do other things.

When deciding on which one to get, look at it this way. Most the cheaper homeowner units have a vertical shaft Briggs motor, usually a 675 series, which is mostly known as a cheap push mower engine. They also use a non-serviceable pump. When you look at the higher grade units, they use a horizontal shaft engine that is usually of a higher quality, and they use 3 piston pumps of a much higher quality that are easily rebuild-able, if ever needed.

Some people prefer to buy equipment, never change the oil/air filter/blades and run it until it wont run any more. They then put it by the road and go buy a new one. This may get them 5-10 years out of a piece of equipment, which some are happy with. I prefer to buy once, take care of it, and have it last forever.

Just because it can make 3800PSI doesn't mean that you have to run it at that pressure. For most stuff like cleaning brick/vinyl siding/concrete I only turn the pressure to about 2/3, otherwise it tends to remove the color from the brick, take up pieces of concrete, or blow holes in the vinyl - not good. It is also easier on the pump and motor which makes them last longer. When I need to remove flaking paint or heavy grime I have the pressure available to blast it off.

Thanks for the supporting comments as well as the advice, and that includes the one about "pump saver" you had mentioned in your previous post. I didn't know about it and I'm not sure where to buy it locally, but I was able to retrieve something from Google when I entered "pressure washer pump saver". Such precautions seem worthwhile to me, and I always drain the gas from any engine I have that I know isn't going to be used for a while.

In regard to turning down the pressure for jobs that do not require full power, I didn't realize there would be a control for that nor that there would even be a gauge to indicate the pressure. The 12-year-old one I have now doesn't, and the only control I have is with the engine throttle position or with distance the tip is held from the surface to be cleaned. And by the way, that's one of the big hangups I have with getting a smaller unit as had been suggested by others. It may be possible to get adequate cleaning ability by holding the tip very close to the surface, but doing that can quadruple the time required.

drumz2129
06-02-2010, 11:47 AM
Thanks for the supporting comments as well as the advice, and that includes the one about "pump saver" you had mentioned in your previous post. I didn't know about it and I'm not sure where to buy it locally, but I was able to retrieve something from Google when I entered "pressure washer pump saver". Such precautions seem worthwhile to me, and I always drain the gas from any engine I have that I know isn't going to be used for a while.

In regard to turning down the pressure for jobs that do not require full power, I didn't realize there would be a control for that nor that there would even be a gauge to indicate the pressure. The 12-year-old one I have now doesn't, and the only control I have is with the engine throttle position or with distance the tip is held from the surface to be cleaned. And by the way, that's one of the big hangups I have with getting a smaller unit as had been suggested by others. It may be possible to get adequate cleaning ability by holding the tip very close to the surface, but doing that can quadruple the time required.

I first saw the 'pump saver' at Sears.
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07174403000P?vName=Lawn%20&%20Garden&cName=PressureWashers&sName=Pressure%20Washer%20Accessories&psid=FROOGLE01&sid=IDx20070921x00003a
Lowes has started carrying it also.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_156904-348-6039_4294820993_4294937087?catalogId=10051&productId=1036935&Ne=4294937087&currentURL=%2Fpl_Pump%2BSaver_4294820993_4294937087_&identifier=Pump+Saver&N=4294820993&langId=-1&Ns=p_product_price|1&storeId=10151&ddkey=http:ProductDisplay

I have be on the same bottle for over 2 years and I use it each time I put the pressure washer away. Remove the hoses, screw the bottle on, spray a little in then you are done. I usually spray some with the pressure adjustment all the way out then all the way in that way it gets lubrication on the plunger too.

As far as draining the gas, there are benefits to draining it (like reduced chance of souring and varnish build up) and benefits of leaving it in and adding a stabilizer (keeping seals from cracking and shrinking). I prefer to leave fuel in my carburetor bowls and add stabilizer. I will only do this for about 3 months then I will run the engine to get fresher fuel in. Fuel sours quicker in smaller quantities, therefore the fuel in the tank last longer than what little is in the bowl. I prefer to do this because if I need to pull a carburetor apart and clean the varnish out I do not want to have to wait on new orings and seals to get it running again.

All the triplex pumps I have ever messed with have a pressure adjustment knob. If full pressure is not needed, turn it down. Some will also idle the engine down slightly so it is not turning such a high RPM. I prefer to leave the RPM high since most small engines make their rated power up high in the RPM band. This reduces the load and chance of bogging the motor which produces more heat.

biggziff
06-02-2010, 11:59 AM
I first saw the 'pump saver' at Sears.
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_07174403000P?vName=Lawn%20&%20Garden&cName=PressureWashers&sName=Pressure%20Washer%20Accessories&psid=FROOGLE01&sid=IDx20070921x00003a


Save your money and buy a gallon of RV antifreeze, a length of clear vinyl hose and a screw on hose adapter. Attach the hose to the adapter, fill 12" of the line with RV antifreeze, pull the motor over until the pump has drained the hose. Put it away for the winter.

drumz2129
06-02-2010, 12:58 PM
Save your money and buy a gallon of RV antifreeze, a length of clear vinyl hose and a screw on hose adapter. Attach the hose to the adapter, fill 12" of the line with RV antifreeze, pull the motor over until the pump has drained the hose. Put it away for the winter.

I'm sure it is just an antifreeze. I prefer something with oil for the seals and something to break up mineral deposits.

Gravel Rat
06-02-2010, 03:41 PM
What ever you do don't buy a Karcher POS the place I work at bought a 4000 PSI unit 3.6 gallons right out of the box it needed repairs couldn't send it back it was a one time buy. Had to buy a heavier replacement hose and the stupid adaptors.

Spend a little more money now than later buy a washer with a Cat or General pump and Honda Power you will own the thing for a long time.

I have done lots of powerwashing over the years the max range for a homeowner would be a 3000 psi unit. The first 4000 PSI unit I ever used had good GPM I have many hours using powerwashers. Had to be very carefull using it wash the siding etc.

The Karcher 4000 PSI unit at work has a rotary axial pump it doesn't put out the pressure like the 4000 PSI Piston pump unit I used both 13 hp Honda power.

My experience range is using 1000 PSI units that were useless to 4000 PSI units that make your arms sore after a hour.

For myself I would buy a 3000-3500 because once you are used to them with a roto head which is what is on the machine 90% of the time, a 2500 PSI unit is too slow for me.

To sum it up if your a ocassional user rent a power washer you can get a industrial grade machine to do the job. I rent one when I need a power washer my familly owns a electric one but it requires 3 phase power you can't use that at home. The electric power washer is nice and quiet and puts out 3000 PSI.

LarryF
06-03-2010, 11:19 AM
All the triplex pumps I have ever messed with have a pressure adjustment knob. If full pressure is not needed, turn it down. Some will also idle the engine down slightly so it is not turning such a high RPM. I prefer to leave the RPM high since most small engines make their rated power up high in the RPM band. This reduces the load and chance of bogging the motor which produces more heat.
I'm wrong and you're right. Now I see the one on my 12-year-old unit. Looks like and is about the same size as a bicycle hand grip? I never paid much attention to it before and didn't know what it was for. The owner's manual didn't mention it and it's unmarked except for a clockwise arrow with a + sign, a counterclockwise arrow with a - sign. There are also lower-case letters that spell "bar". That didn't ring any bells, so I just ignored it. I should have realized that thing had to be an adjustment for either pressure or flow, but since there was no information available regarding its function, I had just left it adjusted to the max clockwise position. Mine takes about 10 360s to go from full + to full -. If it was important, I'd think the manufacturer should have mentioned something about it in the owner's manual. I'll play with it the next time I fire up this pressure washer. Thanks for bringing up the topic.

FiveOJoe --- My son-in-law is going to get the same one you have and is about ready to pull the trigger. Would you tell me where in NJ you got such a great bargain so I can pass it on to him?

drumz2129
06-03-2010, 12:59 PM
I'm wrong and you're right. Now I see the one on my 12-year-old unit. Looks like and is about the same size as a bicycle hand grip? I never paid much attention to it before and didn't know what it was for. The owner's manual didn't mention it and it's unmarked except for a clockwise arrow with a + sign, a counterclockwise arrow with a - sign. There are also lower-case letters that spell "bar". That didn't ring any bells, so I just ignored it. I should have realized that thing had to be an adjustment for either pressure or flow, but since there was no information available regarding its function, I had just left it adjusted to the max clockwise position. Mine takes about 10 360s to go from full + to full -. If it was important, I'd think the manufacturer should have mentioned something about it in the owner's manual. I'll play with it the next time I fire up this pressure washer. Thanks for bringing up the topic.


I always stop and start the engine with the pressure all the way down. It makes it much easier to start and is what the manual states to do. I made the mistake of trying to turn the engine over with the pump loaded... that hurt.

FiveOJoe
06-03-2010, 01:19 PM
That was a real bargain, Joe. You may not be able to even pay that little for just the engine. Same one I picked out for my son-in-law, but I don't think he has ordered it yet. Did you get it from HD? The reason I'm curious is that when I asked HD about it, I was told it can be only gotten by ordering it. Where in NJ are you? Maybe there's a store that has some more it would like to get rid of. If so, I'd like to pay them a visit.




I bought it from a HD where I go almost daily. Just got lucky . I was alerted to a couple of damaged box returns including a Rubbermaid shed for $70 and this pressure washer for $500. The PW is a catalog item only and must be ordered ($899 includes shipping) but it was dropped at this store due to a wet and damaged box. Is it more than I would normally buy? Probably, but the price was right.

LarryF
06-03-2010, 08:35 PM
I bought it from a HD where I go almost daily. Just got lucky . I was alerted to a couple of damaged box returns including a Rubbermaid shed for $70 and this pressure washer for $500. The PW is a catalog item only and must be ordered ($899 includes shipping) but it was dropped at this store due to a wet and damaged box. Is it more than I would normally buy? Probably, but the price was right.

Thanks Joe! I know it is an HD-ordered item and that they normally don't carry it in the store; however, I'm surprised that the one you picked up had even been delivered to the store by virtue of a customer order. The $899 price we were quoted included delivery to one's home. I don't really expect they would have any more than the one you got, but on the other hand, maybe they do. Since I'm in NJ too, I was hoping you would tell me which HD store you got it from so I could at least ask them. The nearest one to me is in Hazlet, NJ and it doesn't have any.

FiveOJoe
06-03-2010, 08:41 PM
Thanks Joe! I know it is an HD-ordered item and that they normally don't carry it in the store; however, I'm surprised that the one you picked up had even been delivered to the store by virtue of a customer order. The $899 price we were quoted included delivery to one's home. I don't really expect they would have any more than the one you got, but on the other hand, maybe they do. Since I'm in NJ too, I was hoping you would tell me which HD store you got it from so I could at least ask them. The nearest one to me is in Hazlet, NJ and it doesn't have any.

They don't have anymore, I'm sure of that. You are correct, they don't normally have them at the stores, it's an internet only item.

LarryF
06-17-2010, 12:15 PM
This is just a note to mention that the Ridgid 3800PSI 4GPM pressure washer has been delivered. I went over to my son-in-law's home today and we fired it up for the first time. He's happy with it, and there's no doubt in my mind it was an excellent choice. It certainly looks like a commercial piece of equipment. I'm a bit puzzled, however, as to why they don't put an hour meter on these since the owners manual has maintenance instructions to be performed after so many hours.

dwost
06-17-2010, 02:24 PM
I bought one mfg by Briggs & Stratton last year. Has a 9hp Vangard and is 3400 psi. It's a horse and works very well. This isn't the exact model but I believe it's the replacement for mine. Specs are a little different. I purchased mine from here as well and was extremely pleased. I paid $700 shipped for it as it was on clearance.

http://www.pressurewashersdirect.com/Briggs-&-Stratton-20325-BONUS/p1499.html