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MikeKle
05-31-2010, 09:04 AM
I have noticed a few times this year when I go out all day mowing and it is hot and humid, the next day, I feel pretty bad, sick to my stomach, and headache mostly, I know all about heat exhaustion and heat stroke, but I have a pretty high heat tolerence, plus the symptoms show up the following morning, not on the same day? I drink plenty of water and do take breaks. Anyone experience this? It really only happens on those long 12 hr or more days and when it is sunny and hot/humid.

Merkava_4
05-31-2010, 09:18 AM
It's the radiation from the sun that will give you body aches at
the end of the day. Get yourself some good sunscreen like Bull Frog.

bohiaa
05-31-2010, 09:20 AM
humm, what are you going to do when it gets hot?

MikeKle
05-31-2010, 09:32 AM
Its not body aches, its a sick stomach feeling and usually diahrea (spelling?) the following day. Its never the same day, always the next morning. So its not heat exhaustion? It was around 87 degrees with high humidity, yeah, when it soars into the 90s, it gets worse.

topsites
05-31-2010, 09:47 AM
When you say you are heat tolerant, I hope this doesn't mean that you think your body can
somehow deal with it "better" than the next guy, I assume it does not mean that you somehow
think you possess certain abilities that other folks may not have, that some kind of way your
body is immune or would not respond to heat in the exact same way as everyone else's would.

I assume it simply means that you've been doing this long enough that you wouldn't think
a little amount of 90 degree weather would bother, even this could be dangerous but nowhere
near as concerning as the first case.

Because maybe you ain't all that, maybe karma's trying to tell you as much.
And maybe not but I thought I'd mention it because it concerns me that someone might
believe they can handle this stuff, although I'm not entirely innocent in thinking this way
either which is why I recognize as much, and I think that could be a dangerous line of thinking?

Hope I didn't knock you down too much :p
But be careful out there.

Because the diarrhea leads me to believe it could be something in the water.
Maybe try filtered water, see if that helps.

It is possible that the heat itself could be causing it, but this would almost require a visit to the doctor
because it would be hard to diagnose, it appears if this were the case that it would be rare but not unheard of...
Again I'm not sure, I would try some filtered water first, also make sure you are drinking at LEAST a gallon a day.

MikeKle
05-31-2010, 10:32 AM
Oh, I probably drank well over a gallon yesterday, more like 3-4 gallons! I will try the filtered water and see if that helps. As far as my heat tolerence, I do not think I am any better than anyone else at working in the heat, but I did read an article that did say a person can build up their heat tolerence over time, and I have been doing this type of work for about 9 yrs now! I did notice on one yard in particular when it bothered me the most, yesterday, I felt completely drained, even was hard to walk around trimming! I even thought about quitting for the day at 3pm! but I got in the truck and sat there for about 15 minutes with the air on and managed to work the rest of the day. Like my dad always tells me, if it is this hard on me at 35, how will it be on another 10 yrs?!

johnwon
05-31-2010, 11:45 AM
Oh, I probably drank well over a gallon yesterday, more like 3-4 gallons! I will try the filtered water and see if that helps. As far as my heat tolerence, I do not think I am any better than anyone else at working in the heat, but I did read an article that did say a person can build up their heat tolerence over time, and I have been doing this type of work for about 9 yrs now! I did notice on one yard in particular when it bothered me the most, yesterday, I felt completely drained, even was hard to walk around trimming! I even thought about quitting for the day at 3pm! but I got in the truck and sat there for about 15 minutes with the air on and managed to work the rest of the day. Like my dad always tells me, if it is this hard on me at 35, how will it be on another 10 yrs?!
Water is good and should be consumed more so than other liquids. But don't forget to replace your electrolytes. This can be done from drinking Gatorade or a similar drink. A banana is also helpful in this case. Also too much sun depletes your body of vitamin C. This info is related to where you mentioned; "I felt completely drained, even hard to walk around trimming."

topsites
05-31-2010, 11:47 AM
Yeah that's cool, it does help when one works out in the heat, we do get used
to it but that in itself presents a danger, too!

Not trying to scare you but anyone else reading this thread as well, BE CAREFUL!

Get so used to it, we stop thinking it can hurt us, forget what we're doing so to speak.

Maybe try taking the work in patches of 15-20 minutes at a time,
then take a rest, at the least catch your breath but cool off some,
then go at it another bit of a while...
Try not to go hour long stretches, what I'm saying, even 30-45
minutes worth of straight trimming could be too much.

I like to find myself a water spigot and careful how full you turn the spigot!
Especially since it's the customer's water.
And watch those hoses, the water gets awful hot at first.
But use some of that water and rinse down my arms, and the face,
sometimes I let it run through my hair but watch the shock!

Cool off a bit, shade helps as well, same with sitting in the a/c in the truck
(that is nice, I must admit).
I also keep a glass or cup handy, rather than drinking straight out of the cooler I use that cup,
the water is awful cold so at times I use it to cool off the skin direct rather than drink it all,
of course I drink water as well but splash it on me, helps cool my body down.

Try not to work too hard in the worst of it, usually noon to 2pm is the hottest
but 11am might not be no joke either, same with 3p.

Keep hydrated, stay cool, and work in short stretches.
Monitor yourself.

Hope that helps, see how it goes.

Oldtimer
05-31-2010, 11:55 AM
At age 42 I went from a sales job to becoming a LCO in Pensacola, Florida. Our 90+ degree, 99% humidity weather really put a hurt on me for the first few weeks. I lived on Gatorade and Grape Kool Aid plus a few cans of Tab each day.

I learned several things about working in the heat.

Don't drink more than 1 cup of coffee in he morning.

Always eat breakfast.
A large of glass of fresh juice makes a good breakfast drink. Juice some carrots, apples and an orange. Take some fruit or raw vegetables to snack on between jobs.

Hydrate yourself before before going to work. Drink all the water you can hold and ice cold water is not necessary. Anything you drink will warm to body temperature very quickly.

Don't wait until you are very thirsty before drinking water.

Drink water. Gatorade is ok but not in large amounts and use the powder. It can be mixed on site.

Avoid all energy drinks all the time.

Don't drink any carbonated beverages during the day.

Always eat lunch. Don't eat a grease burger and fries washed down with an iced drink.

Avoid all tobacco products.

Wear a HAT, not a ball cap. Your ears will last longer.
Use a good sunscreen and remember, one application does not last all day.
Always wear a shirt. A 100% cotton tee will keep you cooler.

If you must wear a ball cap then get some of these.
http://www.wechapps.com/home/home/Cool_Flapps/cool_flapps.html


Oldtimer
Been there, done that, but looking at 70 has slowed me down a bit.

kgcs
05-31-2010, 01:02 PM
Take this seriously. I had the same exact symptoms as you, and I ended up in the hospital. I got a full body cramp, and came close to dying. You need to drink alot of water, but thats not the main thing you can do. When you drink all that water, it dilutes your body's liquids. You need to add to it by drinking gatorade or powerade. If you start cramping bad, you need to drink pedilite. (Its the stuff they give babys after they diarrhea. Its like a strong version of gatorade, just not as good.) You also need more salt, that will help alot.

SLGLawnServer
05-31-2010, 01:06 PM
Just my opinion, but it sounds like the water like another poster noted. Your body can only absorb so much and the delay in effect sounds about right. I'm not a doctor of course, but usually heat/electrolyte problems are more immediate. The delay in your symptoms tells me that your plumbing is what's the problem. Yes, you need to stay hydrated, but you can stop absorbing efficiently as well as if you were over doing it and overheating. I have been involved in some sports that have taught me lessons on electrolyte balance and hydration, and through lots of personal experiences with heat related illnesses. Just the other week, I tackled a large yard that I was not used to. I over-exerted myself in the mid-day heat ended up with serious heat exhaustion. I was very lucky my customer was home and very understanding. I should have known better and I am pretty good of gauging my condition but I did underestimate. The key is to pace yourself and take longer breaks with the appropriate hydration and electrolyte balance. I know, I know, time is money right? Wrong, you can't make money if you kill yourself either.

Drinking too much is also bad especially if you are over exerted. I usually drink an even ratio of water to gator aid - the best stuff in the world for electrolytes! And the thing I am learning better is to take longer breaks to cool down.

The other thing is, I've experienced similar feeling of not feeling too good the next day, that is usually to having way too much sun. I usually get that if I'm out in the sun all day long, and I usually will feel fatigued and sometimes feel under the weather but usually don't have the stomach problems. I know you said you are used to being in the sun, but as I did, don't overestimate yourself!

Final point - take longer breaks to cool off, drink water and gator-aid in appropriate amounts. See a doctor if can't stop the problem or it gets worse!

rpatrizio
05-31-2010, 01:15 PM
I know people say wear a cotton T-shirt but isn't a shirt that is more breatheable better?
Like the sports shirts that really allow air flow. I overheat in T-shirts.

SLGLawnServer
05-31-2010, 03:04 PM
I know people say wear a cotton T-shirt but isn't a shirt that is more breatheable better?
Like the sports shirts that really allow air flow. I overheat in T-shirts.

Yes, sports shirts are, but Fruit of the Loom t's are comfortable, lighter than industry screen printed shirts due to the fiber mixes, and cheaper. I have someone embroider my company name, and she did it cheap for me since she knows me. I know they are lighter because I can still get a light tan underneath my shirt and have a barely noticeable sports bra tan line. They never feel hot to me ever. I've tried wearing screen printed shirts before and I almost die in them when I'm working.

mrealty
05-31-2010, 03:25 PM
How "light" a t-shirt is has nothing to do with the brand (Fruit of the Loom, Hanes, etc) nor does it have to do with whether or not the shirt was screen printed.

Screen Printing companies will give you a choice of 50/50 blend (50% cotton / 50% polyester) which is recommended for people who must work outside in the heat, or 100% cotton (much heavier and keeps in the most heat), or 100% nylon, or 100% polyester. How hot you get also depends upon what ounce the shirt is (i.e. 5oz, 5.5oz, etc) and the darker the color of the shirt, the more heat it will absorb.

"Sports shirts", often times called "Polo shirts" follow the same rules. In addition, the 100% cotton Pique Knit polo shirts are heavier than non-pique knit 100% polo shirts.

You could very easily have a 50/50 blend white 4oz t-shirt that is much cooler than a 100% cotton white 6.5oz Pique Knit polo shirt.

If you are overheating, stay light on the color, light on the cotton, and light on the weight (oz).

jj123
05-31-2010, 03:30 PM
just what we needed to know, that you have a sports bra tan line under your shirt

Cboy7
05-31-2010, 04:53 PM
At age 42 I went from a sales job to becoming a LCO in Pensacola, Florida. Our 90+ degree, 99% humidity weather really put a hurt on me for the first few weeks. I lived on Gatorade and Grape Kool Aid plus a few cans of Tab each day.

I learned several things about working in the heat.

Don't drink more than 1 cup of coffee in he morning.

Always eat breakfast.
A large of glass of fresh juice makes a good breakfast drink. Juice some carrots, apples and an orange. Take some fruit or raw vegetables to snack on between jobs.

Hydrate yourself before before going to work. Drink all the water you can hold and ice cold water is not necessary. Anything you drink will warm to body temperature very quickly.

Don't wait until you are very thirsty before drinking water.

Drink water. Gatorade is ok but not in large amounts and use the powder. It can be mixed on site.

Avoid all energy drinks all the time.

Don't drink any carbonated beverages during the day.

Always eat lunch. Don't eat a grease burger and fries washed down with an iced drink.

Avoid all tobacco products.

Wear a HAT, not a ball cap. Your ears will last longer.
Use a good sunscreen and remember, one application does not last all day.
Always wear a shirt. A 100% cotton tee will keep you cooler.

If you must wear a ball cap then get some of these.
http://www.wechapps.com/home/home/Cool_Flapps/cool_flapps.html


Oldtimer
Been there, done that, but looking at 70 has slowed me down a bit.
these are great tips.

I would also say , consider starting earlier and stop working at 2-3pm.

all the money in the world cant buy health

Cboy7
05-31-2010, 04:55 PM
oh and long sleeve t shirts ... the mexicans are on to something there.. you know the more skin is exposed the more the sun can dry you out like a prune.

Oldtimer
05-31-2010, 05:53 PM
Drinking too much is also bad especially if you are over exerted. I usually drink an even ratio of water to gator aid - the best stuff in the world for electrolytes! And the thing I am learning better is to take longer breaks to cool down.

My how times have changed. I went to high school in the 1950's right in the center of the San Joaquin valley where it didn't rain from April to September. The first 2 weeks of high school were half days so the students whose families had vineyards could work from daylight until noon and not miss school. A lot of students were employed by vineyard owners since there were no laws against a teenager having a job and operating equipment. This was the raisin capital of the world and they had to be picked up before any rain fell. Several of these same students played football and practice was after school. Now, here is a group of teenagers who drank nothing but water all morning while working in 90-100 degree weather, went to class until 5 PM and were not allowed to drink any water during football practice. Our red practice jerseys would be salt encrusted at the end of the week and I can't remember anyone having problems with the heat. We did have salt tablets available before practice buy they were not used by everyone.

We didn't have time to take breaks.

Oldtimer

SLGLawnServer
05-31-2010, 07:24 PM
My how times have changed. I went to high school in the 1950's right in the center of the San Joaquin valley where it didn't rain from April to September. The first 2 weeks of high school were half days so the students whose families had vineyards could work from daylight until noon and not miss school. A lot of students were employed by vineyard owners since there were no laws against a teenager having a job and operating equipment. This was the raisin capital of the world and they had to be picked up before any rain fell. Several of these same students played football and practice was after school. Now, here is a group of teenagers who drank nothing but water all morning while working in 90-100 degree weather, went to class until 5 PM and were not allowed to drink any water during football practice. Our red practice jerseys would be salt encrusted at the end of the week and I can't remember anyone having problems with the heat. We did have salt tablets available before practice buy they were not used by everyone.

We didn't have time to take breaks.

Oldtimer

No disrespect Oldtimer, but everyone is different, not everyone walked two miles uphill to school in the snow with worn out shoes, but thanks for the input... just sharing ideas, not creating controversy. Anyways, enough soapbox stuff for me. I like keeping it friendly :walking:

SLGLawnServer
05-31-2010, 07:25 PM
just what we needed to know, that you have a sports bra tan line under your shirt

Sorry, just making a point..besides, sports bras are designed to be worn outside too. :cool2:

SLGLawnServer
05-31-2010, 07:35 PM
"Sports shirts", often times called "Polo shirts" follow the same rules. In addition, the 100% cotton Pique Knit polo shirts are heavier than non-pique knit 100% polo shirts.


I think he means the new high performance wear, not polo style shirts. I was saying from my experience with the clothes that I have worn. I can't speak for the other type of shirts. Apparently the FOTL shirts are made of light and breathable fabric. But I do agree with you though. *trucewhiteflag*

MikeKle
05-31-2010, 08:23 PM
I wear the under armour shirts, the ones with the UV protection in the fabric, I used to wear regular cotton tees until a friend turned me on the UA, now I wont even buy anything else! They really are amazing!! Try them out if you havent yet, they are worth every penny of the $25. price tag. I know their claims sound too good to be true, but their shirts really do work the way they claim! Thankfully I am now caught up for about 3-4 days, so I can rest up and get ready for the next week! Feels great to sit here and relax in the A/C and not have to work the next 2 days! However my stomach is a wreck! I havent eaten anything unitl I got home and thought I was hungry...WRONG!! Eating a grilled out burger and some potato salad made me feel worse, so I took some pepcid.

LBLC_LCO
05-31-2010, 08:30 PM
oh and long sleeve t shirts ... the mexicans are on to something there.. you know the more skin is exposed the more the sun can dry you out like a prune.

I switched to long sleeves this year, wearing long sleeve Under Armour heat gear(loose fit and made with UPF 50 in it to help block the suns rays ). So far I like the change..highs right now only 85 though. But it dries quickly and with a breeze it seems to help cool you down. I know I feel better at the end of the day without the sun baking me as much.

SLGLawnServer
05-31-2010, 08:45 PM
I have been seriously considering going long sleeve. I used to think it was crazy, but I've learned to cover up. I am covered head to toe except for the t-shirt. I've noticed my arms are getting really dark and have been starting to itch where they are exposed. I think it's time to make that consideration!

mdlwn1
05-31-2010, 09:11 PM
Long sleeve performance shirts. Wide brimmed hat. Gatorade 50/50 or less with water. Sodium. OJ 50/50 water. 1 can of coke as a treat around 3 or 4. Food...no oils/burgers/fries/tomatoe suace or anything remoptely similar. Protien and berries if possible for breakfast, Deli sandwiches without mayo or similar for lunch...eaten in small amounts through out the day. Only hose off your forearms when hot. Only rinse your head if the next step is the hospital....this makes you hotter as you continue working as the sweat can no longer evaporate. Rinse your head only at lunch or when it can completely dry before working again. Wearing 2 thin shirts above 90 can actually help you when the humidity is high. Last but not least......air conditioning is only for the ride home...it will make you sick everyday from the cold/hot/cold/hot.

Lordtimothy
05-31-2010, 09:31 PM
What I do when outside in the Sun and heat for long periods of time is take salt tablets. Just drinking water is not enough. When you sweat you lose Electrolites (sp?) and other vital elements. So go down to your pharmacy and check out the salt tablets or what they have for that. It makes a HUGE difference. When I am outside and I start to feel a headache coming on I normally pop a salt tablet and poof the headache almost always dissappears soon after.

Timothy

lawnprosteveo
05-31-2010, 10:16 PM
Are you getting enough electrolytes. You lose more than just water when you sweat. Try mixing some gatorade extra strong. Drink a couple of those along with your water throughout the day. Also, are you eating enough? If your blood sugar gets too low you will get headaches and sick stomach. Try munching on salty snacks throughout the day. Peanuts, trailmix, stuff like that. Maybe even a bananna for the potassium.

DBE022576
05-31-2010, 10:32 PM
I used to drive a truck and hand unload the freight (piece by piece, by hand, no pallets,etc). After a couple of really bad trips to the miami area, I learned my lesson. I drink Gatorade with a teaspoon of salt added to it and try to drink one 20 gatorade to 1 1/2 liter of water. I snack on nuts (sunflowers seeds, peanuts, etc) and always drink a glass of oj (highest potassium levels I can find without bananas or tomatoes/V8 juice) with a good breakfast. Not a greasy mcmuffin or crossanwich. I try to keep several fresh shirts with me to change between customers and I use a wash cloth to wet down and cool my arms/head off with. A light weight hat that doesn't soak up too much sweat is good too.

rpatrizio
05-31-2010, 10:35 PM
Originally Posted by mrealty View Post
"Sports shirts", often times called "Polo shirts" follow the same rules. In addition, the 100% cotton Pique Knit polo shirts are heavier than non-pique knit 100% polo shirts.
I think he means the new high performance wear, not polo style shirts. I was saying from my experience with the clothes that I have worn. I can't speak for the other type of shirts. Apparently the FOTL shirts are made of light and breathable fabric. But I do agree with you though.


Exactly what i was thinking, like high performance shirts runners wear.

unkownfl
05-31-2010, 10:53 PM
What are you eating Mike? Anything with dairy? I use to be able to drink a glass of milk with breakfast but I can't do it anymore. I had to switch to Almond breeze. Also, I wear the Columbian fishing long sleeve shirts they have like 30 or 50spf in them and are breathable its like wearing no shirt.

Jay Ray
06-01-2010, 12:31 AM
I'm carrying just water now, but the first time it is hard to make a decision and I wonder what to do next, or wake up in the middle of the night with cramps, I'll carry Gatorade and water. It won't be long. Should start now but I really only want the electrolytes, not the sugar.

SLGLawnServer
06-01-2010, 12:46 AM
I'm carrying just water now, but the first time it is hard to make a decision and I wonder what to do next, or wake up in the middle of the night with cramps, I'll carry Gatorade and water. It won't be long. Should start now but I really only want the electrolytes, not the sugar.

Gator aide G2 has lower sugar. However, if you are exerting yourself, especially if you are a walker, not a rider, you don't have to worry too much - unless you're diabetic????

T.M. LAWNS
06-01-2010, 12:50 AM
Do they make a sports drink without all the damn surgar?

Lordtimothy
06-01-2010, 12:54 AM
Hit the pharmacy up or Walgreens or something. There is Electrolyte tablets that does the same thing as Gatoraid. Cheaper and has no sugar added. Lots of bikers use them when taking long road trips pedeling thier hearts out.

Timothy

T.M. LAWNS
06-01-2010, 12:58 AM
Hit the pharmacy up or Walgreens or something. There is Electrolyte tablets that does the same thing as Gatoraid. Cheaper and has no sugar added. Lots of bikers use them when taking long road trips pedeling thier hearts out.

Timothy

Thanks Timothy, I'll give them a try.

SLGLawnServer
06-01-2010, 01:00 AM
Hit the pharmacy up or Walgreens or something. There is Electrolyte tablets that does the same thing as Gatoraid. Cheaper and has no sugar added. Lots of bikers use them when taking long road trips pedeling thier hearts out.

Timothy

I'll second that!:weightlifter: