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View Full Version : Question - Installing Bullnose Pool Coping


Allen@hilltop
06-05-2010, 11:28 AM
I have plenty of paver experience but this is my first installing pool coping. I am installing Belgard Pavers around a vinyl liner pool with steel walls along with a bullnose pool coping paver. The top of the pool steel wall has a pvc track that connects to the liner. This track causes the front edge to be higher than the back edge. (photo included) I will be pouring a 3 ft concrete base out from the pool dropped to allow for a sand base. I know to use the expansion joint between the row of coping and the pavers. I need some experienced advice for how to attach the coping and how to obtain level. I have seen posting stating use mortor, adhesive, thinset. I don't want these popping off later. Thanks.

zedosix
06-06-2010, 09:57 PM
Use thinset mortar and a small level to guage your slope.

Rex Mann
06-07-2010, 10:59 AM
We use modified thinset. Modified is a heavy mix for heavier items, like pavers.

Peace,

Rex

http://PaversInstalled.com

zedosix
06-07-2010, 05:28 PM
We use modified thinset. Modified is a heavy mix for heavier items, like pavers.

Peace,

Rex

http://PaversInstalled.com

That is right, we use a modified thinset mortar. Have done at least 30 pools in last 3 yrs using that stuff. No problems up to now.

BMB Hardscape
05-10-2015, 07:54 PM
Sorry to drag this old thread back to life, bu I am doing a pool coming up pretty soon here, same as the one pictured above. I was also told a few different options, and just not sure which to go with.
All of them said to pour a 5,000 PSI concrete base all the way around about 12" off the edge of the pool, the bull nose is 12" in length and will have a 1" over hang, exactly as pictured above.
Now with the setting bed, one guy said use thinset mortar, one said just PL glue it down to the concrete or use an A/B apoxy glue.
What do you guys think, this thread is a few years old...so I was wondering what are some new installation techniques/methods. Any ideas and experiences are appreciated!

DVS Hardscaper
05-10-2015, 09:44 PM
no new techniques.

just common sense.

First thing - you're in NY, so you wanna be proactive with what you do in regards to the winter heaving.

alldayrj
05-10-2015, 10:45 PM
Brian we mortar them and put a mortar joint in between. You could PL but that concrete would have to be 100% perfect and i think mortar is stronger anyway. The romans didnt use PL

BMB Hardscape
05-11-2015, 07:08 PM
Thanks DVS, very insightful as per usual.
Rj, yeah that's what another old timer mason from up here said to do, set it in a mortar bed and slick the joints...but the customer doesn't want mortared joints, just fit tight which I wasn't sure about either. The way I am leaning is using a two part A/B Epoxy to stick them down to the concrete, which will be perfect, form and poured. My supplier said these pieces will never move or come off with this epoxy, and it works the best for our immediate area. Just the epoxy is like $23 per 12 ounce tube.....and I need a box of 24! But it's my first one, I want to do it correctly and never have an issue.

DVS Hardscaper
05-11-2015, 09:13 PM
Thanks DVS, very insightful as per usual.
Rj, yeah that's what another old timer mason from up here said to do, set it in a mortar bed and slick the joints...but the customer doesn't want mortared joints, just fit tight which I wasn't sure about either. The way I am leaning is using a two part A/B Epoxy to stick them down to the concrete, which will be perfect, form and poured. My supplier said these pieces will never move or come off with this epoxy, and it works the best for our immediate area. Just the epoxy is like $23 per 12 ounce tube.....and I need a box of 24! But it's my first one, I want to do it correctly and never have an issue.


Not all vinyl lined pools have the same framing. I'm around so many pools, I see them in my sleep. Often times the steel panels are rusted or they're starting to rust. Which is what I mean by "common sense". You have to see what you're working with and know what you're working with before you commit to your client. The pool job we started today - was thought to be steel framed. Nope. It's not. It's fiberglass. If the homeowner is not the one who had the pool built - then they may not even know what it's made of (steel, fiberglass, plywood). So my point is - being this is the internet - we must make sure to disclose all the possible surprises that could arise. Knowing what I know about pools - me, personally, I would never put a coping around a vinyl lined pool. Yes, I'm well aware that it's done. But vinyl lied pools really are not intended to have such copings.

Good luck, and I'd love to see pictures during and finished.

Junior M
06-02-2015, 06:48 AM
We do 80 liner change outs a year, build and renovate all types of pools.. I can't stand a vinyl pool with a true paver system.. Maybe they weren't installed correctly but they just never turn out well, always water problems, problems with the liner track..

But if I were goin to install pavers and coping on a vinyl pool I'd pour a cantilever deck and then install the renovation type pavers (1in thick) and coping.
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G_Dubs
06-14-2015, 10:34 PM
I've got a similar project starting right now where there is and existing metal "C" coping on the pool now because the customer was going to pour a 12" coping and have me lay pavers to that. now they are having the pool installer remove that, and install the extrusion piece so that I can install bullnose. hes a week or so out.
It's holding us up on finishing the project (all the landscape plantings are done, finish graded, pavers are on site)

I'd be crazy to assume the top of that C coping is the same as the the top of my bullnose and lay my patio from the outside in, and laying off the edge cuts until the bullnose is installed, right? If i even miscalculate by a little, it seems like it could be disastrous, anyone ever done it?

AztlanLC
06-15-2015, 12:31 PM
This is what we do and has worked real good so far, install foam on the metal part like the one they use under framing the blue type, attach metal lath with screws and then scratch coat, finally use thin set mortar.
Sharing how it has worked for us here up north

neversatisfiedj
06-15-2015, 02:13 PM
What mortar would you use for travertine pool coping ?

AztlanLC
06-15-2015, 02:17 PM
Type S, just a caution with travertine there is many types check with your supplier to make sure it can be used on a wet application some of them are not meant to be in areas with frost.

neversatisfiedj
06-16-2015, 07:11 AM
I am fixing my place. The frost heave has been a problem it looks like. PArt of the problem is whoever installed used stone dust. Some of my coping is coming off. The coping is around a gunite pool. Is there a dye I can put in mortar to color tan ?

AztlanLC
06-16-2015, 02:13 PM
There are many types of dye you can use even home depot sells some but your best option would be a specialized concrete products supplier

custom patios
06-16-2015, 08:51 PM
so the client wants tights joints and no grout. I would not use type s regardless. just not strong enough for this application over time. Whats even better for this application than a modified thinset is a multipurpose epoxy grout. Excellent adhesion to metal, high flexural and compressive strength up to 10000psi, and excellent freeze/ thaw qualities.
It has a short setting time so you only mix a little at a time, enough to use within about 20 minutes.

DVS Hardscaper
06-16-2015, 10:44 PM
Water will get into the tight joints and will freeze and POP the coping loose.

Customers usually want these sort of things not being aware of the realities.

You need to advise them that this is not a good idea, unless they live in FL, GA, TX, CA, etc

custom patios
06-17-2015, 06:04 AM
I live in a freeze thaw zone. I have never had one stone become loose ever. If the joint is tight, not enough water can enter through the joint to the point where it can create enough force to break the bond. Rather it is usually the type of stone (one that is too porous for example) that will cause a bond to break because of expansion and contraction, not because of a joint.