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Matt Hermann
06-13-2010, 12:25 AM
Hey, I'm 15 and I have a little lawn mowing company. I've been asked by one of my customers to lay sod in this area where he used to have a playground. All the wood chips and the railroad ties are removed. Any tips on applying the sod? I was thinking level the ground down an inch or so, water the ground, apply sod, wate again, then done. Is that right? And how much do I order, should I measure the section where I will be applying it and tell them the square footage? and what is a Pallet? All help is appricated. Thanks, Matt.

Lbilawncare
06-13-2010, 12:41 AM
A pallet is the square wood that the sod comes on, it is designed to be loaded with a forklift. Be sure the area is smooth/level, don't water beforehand unless you like working in mud. Measure the area to determine how much you need. Green side up, and cut the sod so your seams don't line up.

Matt Hermann
06-13-2010, 12:44 AM
lbilawncare, what do you mean cut it so your seams dont line up? and should i just spray the durt a bit before i lay it, so its not totally dry or dont even do that?

thanks!

dKoester
06-13-2010, 01:28 AM
http://www.ehow.com/video_2329066_lay-sod.html

ajslands
06-13-2010, 01:34 AM
If the seams line up, it won't grow right. So you have to stagger the sod when laying it down, also you might want to consider in renting a skid ster and getting a Harley rake to till up the ground. Also after the sod is layed; WATER WATER and more WATER!!!!! for like 2-3 weeks straight. Oh and right after you lay it down, roll it to get the air pockets out of the sod. And then when you cut it, do it about 3 weeks after you layed it down, use a push mower and bag it on the highest setting.


If you don't mind me asking; how much sod are you laying down? Because you'll need to know how many pallets to order!
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grassman177
06-13-2010, 09:21 AM
some good advice here from these guys. i may add that it helps to have loosened dirt(dry at time of laying) to put down on. either tilled a little bit and leveled or applyed fresh topsoil to the area first if needed. the roots of the sod need an easy substrate to grow into if it is to be a success. also a starter fert like 18-24 -12 under the sod before laying is a great idea, but if you are not familiar with the application of this dont do it as you may do much damage and kill the sod. staggering the seams is very important as well as tucking the seam edges down so they dont face up if that makes sense. otherwise they will dry out to easy and you will have all the edges of the sod die.

Matt Hermann
06-13-2010, 11:11 AM
I'm getting enough sod to cover the size of medium sized playground in the guy's backyard. It's mainly in the shade, are there different types of sod i should look into that would do best growing there?

ajslands
06-13-2010, 12:11 PM
The farm that you buy it at is most likely onl going to have one type of sod, more thanikely the type that is native to that area. Now you say your going to have enough, dud you measure and do you know how many rolls come on a pallet?
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Matt Hermann
06-13-2010, 12:33 PM
I didn't measure it yet, I'm going to do that sometime this week. Then I will call and ask for enough sod to cover x ft by x ft.

ajslands
06-13-2010, 01:05 PM
You have to find the area, then the sod farm will tell you, there's 70 rolls on a pallet, and it's good for 700^2 ft or something like that.
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grassman177
06-13-2010, 06:38 PM
The farm that you buy it at is most likely onl going to have one type of sod, more thanikely the type that is native to that area. Now you say your going to have enough, dud you measure and do you know how many rolls come on a pallet?
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correction to this statement, no sod is grown from native grasses as the tuf grass we use in the US is NOT native to north america at all. try europe instead!

what i think he means is grass grown or bred to perform well in your climate

ajslands
06-13-2010, 06:47 PM
correction to this statement, no sod is grown from native grasses as the tuf grass we use in the US is NOT native to north america at all. try europe instead!

what i think he means is grass grown or bred to perform well in your climate

grrr!:dancing:

thats what i mean

Matt Hermann
06-13-2010, 07:07 PM
so, how do you price a job like this? hourly?

ajslands
06-13-2010, 07:24 PM
or by the pallet

ajslands
06-13-2010, 07:25 PM
or any other way you choose,

grassman177
06-13-2010, 08:21 PM
hourly is good as long as you know how long it will take, dont sell yourself short

ACA L&L
06-13-2010, 08:45 PM
laying sod is all about the prep work, if you have never done it you may want to look for a how tobook or video online, good luck.

AzLawnMan
06-13-2010, 10:17 PM
Always amazes me how many of you work by the hour and not the job. I get calls all day long, saying "It will only take you this long to do it, so how much?" I always answer the same, "I dont work by the hour, I work by the job" if it takes me 10 minutes or an hour, it depends on what I am doing. I pay $3.20 for a piece of 10 sqft of sod, I charge $8.50 apiece just for the sod. I also charge for prep, multch, gypsum, starter fertilizer and sprinkler head adjustment. I just did a small job friday, 400 sqft it took me and 2 of my guys about 20 minutes to lay the sod. But it took about an hour or so to prep it. We leveled the ground and added multch and the gypsum. Very easy when you know what you are doing. I have a 2k sqft job on tuesday that is already prep and ready to go. About an hour with 3 guys. As far as grass, it depends on what your distrubuter has and what type the customer would like. We have a hybrid called "Bob Sod" designed for Arizona. But there is all sorts, and of course price varies for different types of grass. I must stress spending enough time to prep the area. Was there dogs on the previous grass? What happened to the old grass? did it die? why did it die? If the old stuff died and you just put new stuff right on top, well Im betting that stuff will dies as well. Not as easy as just laying the sod and walking away.

Matt Hermann
06-14-2010, 01:32 PM
so today I went and measured. it comes to a total of 864 sqft. so i'll round that to 870sqft i guess incase I mess up a roll or something? would that be a good idea? so ill just call a sod farm, and ask them for enough to cover that area right? thanks guys

RakenShovel
06-14-2010, 05:27 PM
so today I went and measured. it comes to a total of 864 sqft. so i'll round that to 870sqft i guess incase I mess up a roll or something? would that be a good idea? so ill just call a sod farm, and ask them for enough to cover that area right? thanks guys

That should be enough for the sod company to hook you up. If you know how many square feet each roll from whoever you're getting sod from covers, you can go ahead and do the math on that and order the amount of rolls you need. Sod typically is either 9 or 10 square ft per roll.

Matt Hermann
06-14-2010, 06:21 PM
ok, thanks for all the help!

icehawc
06-18-2010, 02:01 AM
If you measurement is quite accurate you are still going to need a little more sod for cutting, staggering the sod so to fit and conform to the yard around tree wells if any, sidewalks and especially if the area is not completely square. So say add 5 to 10 % depending on the shape of the area.