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View Full Version : Front tires keep digging in lawns


jay317
06-18-2010, 12:17 AM
My front tires on my ztr keeps digging in the ground everytime I turn leaving holes in yards I'm puzzled and don't know what to do, one client has already called me and complained about it I'm really puzzled
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ShooterK2
06-18-2010, 12:30 AM
Did you just buy this mower? Has it always done this, or just started? Sounds like it's either too heavy on the front end, or maybe the casters aren't spinning freely.

jay317
06-18-2010, 12:42 AM
I just bought this mower could it be too much air in the front tires
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topsites
06-18-2010, 12:43 AM
Uhh...

Yeah, I guess...
I find it a bit odd because I always have mine filled to Max.psi and sometimes more...
But at some point if it's way over full, I would think it could definitely dig as you describe.

For another it is very possible that somewhere between manufacture and dealer assembly
SOMEONE filled up the tires with WAY too much air, not really meaning to.

So I would go ahead and check it with a tire pressure gauge, then compare the
reading to what it says on the sidewall of the tire.

Also have you greased all your zerks?
No, not yours, the mower's :p
It could be in dire need of grease.

T.M. LAWNS
06-18-2010, 12:45 AM
You should jackup the front of your mower and check both casters, make sure they move freely.

jay317
06-18-2010, 12:52 AM
Yeah I got everything all greased up
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jay317
06-18-2010, 12:56 AM
And what if they are not moving freely then what's the next step
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MOturkey
06-18-2010, 01:03 AM
Regarding the tires themselves, I suspect underinflation would likely cause a problem more than overinflation. I suspect though, that it is simply because the front of your Z (you didn't mention make and model) is heavier than you've been used to. My newer Gravely's are much heavier in the front than my first one, a 2002 model. I'm assuming this is partially due to a shortening of the frame, and possibly also to make them safer on slopes.

One trick is to avoid stopping and then backing straight back, as this causes the casters to spin 180 degrees in one spot. If the soil is wet, or the grass thin, I try to "swing" the front when reversing, causing the front end to go in a semi-circle. This allows the tires to do the 180 over a couple of feet of ground, instead of in one spot. Takes a little longer, but not a lot. I mowed a property yesterday that is all shaded. Ground was still a bit wet, and the grass is extremely thin in many places. I used this technique, and didn't dig a hole anywhere, that I'm aware of.

Same principal as with the rear tires. If you spin on one, you are going to tear turf. Keep them both moving while turning, and damage is minimized. Hope this helps you out.

Grubrunner
06-18-2010, 01:29 AM
Regarding the tires themselves, I suspect underinflation would likely cause a problem more than overinflation.....

Huh?

Please explain.

MS_SURVEYOR
06-18-2010, 02:18 AM
Originally Posted by MOturkey View Post
Regarding the tires themselves, I suspect underinflation would likely cause a problem more than overinflation.....

I'm wondering the same thing myself?? I've never had a problem with the front tires. Now burning turf with the rear,,, yea!

JimQ
06-18-2010, 10:48 AM
Under-inflated tires have a larger contact patch and a more "Square shoulder" if you can imagine that. Put more air in the tire and the contact patch is reduced and the tire starts to get a domed shape to it.

In my opinion, the described issue is more likely to occur when the tires are under inflated.

Here are a few more thoughts.....

Are you sure it's the casters causing the problem? Have you witnessed them tear the turf? It's generally the rear wheels that tear the turf when turning.

Any chance your machine has semi-pneumatic caster tires? They tend to have a large contact patch and a very square shoulder. I've heard complaints of them tearing the turf in certain conditions.

What kind of grass are you cutting? Tall Bermuda, fine Fescue in a shady area? There are certain grass types that are easier than others to damage.

Throw out as much information as you can. Machine type, location, conditions, grass type, etc...

Q

Richard Martin
06-18-2010, 11:51 AM
My Dixie used to do the same thing. Then I took 75 pounds off of the front and it stopped doing it for the most part.

Grubrunner
06-18-2010, 10:24 PM
My Dixie used to do the same thing. Then I took 75 pounds off of the front and it stopped doing it for the most part.

How'd you do that? Removed the front caster weights?

PPS.inc
06-19-2010, 01:05 AM
it pry the soild front tire that come on everything now. They rip everything up. Check, bet you dont even have air inlets on the tires. I hate those tires

SouthSide Cutter
06-19-2010, 01:20 AM
it pry the soild front tire that come on everything now. They rip everything up. Check, bet you dont even have air inlets on the tires. I hate those tires

Never thought about this until you said it. On my mowers 61" Bobcat and 61" Tiger Cub they have air, dont notice this much and tires look fine. But on my 61" TT they dont have air and are cut all to hell and cut up the turf unless you do the 180 turn. And I mean cut all to hell and have big chunks missing.
Now they all mow the same properties!!!!

MS_SURVEYOR
06-19-2010, 03:33 AM
I don't know? I just don't have that problem. I do have this vision of a fat girl I saw mowing with an LT coming around the side of the house flying, making the turn at high speed, rolling both front tires off the rims, plowing dirt for ever, coming to a stop cussing her old man about getting that piece crap fixed or his azz was going to hit the road. I left! So I can't answer that question. I have been scared!

Richard Martin
06-19-2010, 05:06 AM
How'd you do that? Removed the front caster weights?

I removed the front stainless steel floor pan and replaced it with a piece of 1/4" aluminum diamond plate and then moved the battery from the front to the right rear.