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fastpine
06-24-2010, 09:58 PM
.....I have 10 res accounts and 9 of them are getting these large, spread out, rusty brown spots...Some worse than others. One is sooo bad that she canceled her service because the whole lawn is lookin like a hay field. Im terribly concerned that other customers will follow suit as there wont be any lawn to mow here in a month or so..

One of them we recently areated, and fertilized..Its the worst. Large sections are dying!

Ive noticed it all over town. Even the city maintained grass, and some golf courses are getting it..

I cannot afford to loose these accounts. I figure its a fungus of somekind.

This is my first year in the business and I have no idea what to do,,

Please help.

Cutter1
06-24-2010, 09:59 PM
post some pics

ukcats
06-24-2010, 10:02 PM
alot of my lawns are looking the same way. However ours are dying due to lack of rain. Its been along time since we had a nice all day rain

fastpine
06-24-2010, 10:10 PM
post some pics

I will ASAP..The brown/dead spots resemble old school cammo pattern. and they seem to be starting from the tip of the blades and working down till the whole area is dead..

Multiple customers commented that they have been watering a ton, to no avail.....

fatboynormmie
06-24-2010, 10:20 PM
You might have dropped to much fert. and have burned the lawn

ICT Bill
06-24-2010, 10:42 PM
without pictures or being onsite it is impossible to tell what is going on, contact your local extention agent as quickly as possible, they will know

topsites
06-24-2010, 10:47 PM
No, it ain't a fungus, at least I don't think it is.
Most likely it's called summer.

Some is unavoidable but chances are certain mowers need to slow it way down.

The heat and lack of rain are hard on turf, then when we cut it that's even harder.
Technically speaking mowing a lawn is not "good" for the turf, it makes it look nice but
from the plant's perspective it's not a healthy thing to do.

It's not like getting a hair cut or a car washing, a lawn is a live plant that needs to be treated as such.

So I usually extend my service interval at this time to 3-4 weeks between cuts...
And that sounds harsh but way I see things it's either 3-4 weeks or no lawn at all.
Fact is it's just not growing, so why cut it?

Rule of thumb: If or WHEN it first starts to browning, that's usually a sign the lawn is stressing
from the heat, cutting it makes it worse, time to slow down.

Raising the cut height also helps.

MileHigh
06-24-2010, 10:52 PM
The heat and lack of rain are hard on turf, I usually extend my service interval
at this time to 3-4 weeks between cuts...



You must fish a lot with your time or have a some good hobbies..

Here's what I do.

I only service properties with Irrigation...Problem solved.

Plus the irrigation opens up many doors for more work.

3 to 4 weeks??????...thats ludicrous.

My clients would FIRE me so fast If I didn't show up for a freaking month?

MileHigh
06-24-2010, 10:55 PM
Rule of thumb.

If the lawn is starting to go brown, or hell even before that happens...when summer hits.

Turn the irrigation up...Or check to see if the sprinkler heads are getting the proper coverage....and continue cutting cause I have a family to feed and bills to pay, and a SCHEDULED business to run.

MikeKle
06-25-2010, 11:11 AM
You must fish a lot with your time or have a some good hobbies..

Here's what I do.

I only service properties with Irrigation...Problem solved.

Plus the irrigation opens up many doors for more work.

3 to 4 weeks??????...thats ludicrous.

My clients would FIRE me so fast If I didn't show up for a freaking month?

During extreme droughts, I have went 3-4 weeks without mowing and the customers are fine with it. In fact, if I were to come cut it when it doesnt need it, they would likely fire me! It is pretty simple, it the grass needs mowing, mow it, if it doesnt , you dont mow it, in dry periods in many areas, the grass goes dormant and wont need mowing until it gets some water, and that could be 3-4 weeks,but usually they look at little "ratty" by that time, so they will have be mow it anyway.

fastpine
06-25-2010, 12:16 PM
No, it ain't a fungus, at least I don't think it is.
Most likely it's called summer.

Some is unavoidable but chances are certain mowers need to slow it way down.

The heat and lack of rain are hard on turf, then when we cut it that's even harder.
Technically speaking mowing a lawn is not "good" for the turf, it makes it look nice but
from the plant's perspective it's not a healthy thing to do.

It's not like getting a hair cut or a car washing, a lawn is a live plant that needs to be treated as such.

So I usually extend my service interval at this time to 3-4 weeks between cuts...
And that sounds harsh but way I see things it's either 3-4 weeks or no lawn at all.
Fact is it's just not growing, so why cut it?

Rule of thumb: If or WHEN it first starts to browning, that's usually a sign the lawn is stressing
from the heat, cutting it makes it worse, time to slow down.

Raising the cut height also helps.


All my customers have commented that they have been watering a ton, to no avail...Ive also recieved comments such as " Ive always had the nicest lawn on the block, now there are these brown spots creaping up everywhere".
It looks like the lawns are thirsty as hell, but the custys are watering regularly...

fastpine
06-25-2010, 01:39 PM
This crap is happening all over town...On the way to get the flicks, I saw a LCO in front of a appartment complex watering these same brown spots..

fastpine
06-25-2010, 01:41 PM
..Again, I dont think its a heat, or under watering issue, I noticed one of the soccer fields had it baaaad.

Any ideas fellas?

twcw5804
06-25-2010, 02:20 PM
Today I was sitting down in the customers side yard to take a quick cigarette break...The Lady comes out and shits on me,,She says" Dont smoke so close to the house!"...As if it was flammable or something:laugh:...

Maybe your cigarette smoke is killing the grass.

fastpine
06-25-2010, 02:30 PM
:laugh:...

Maby..

I just got off the phone with the extension agent. She said it could likely be sun burn...We had record highs recently..

She also said that she has recieved many calls about the same thing, but it would be impossible to tell without sending a sample to the lab...

She said it may also be grubbs but I dont think so, because its happening all over town...

sweatyclippingcoveredguy
06-25-2010, 04:06 PM
From those pictures, it kinda just looks like it's beginning to go dormant. Also, don't water during the peak sun/heat times of the day.

decypher
06-25-2010, 04:42 PM
Im no expert but is it possible that the smaller spots near the edge or curb may be from dog piss or perhaps spilled gasoline when refueling? The larger ones are probably dormant patches from excessive heat or not enough water coverage...

fastpine
06-26-2010, 08:51 PM
Any other ideas...for those of you fimiliar with sun burn,,does this look like its burnt?

topsites
06-26-2010, 09:07 PM
Yes it looks burnt...

All right, so your customers are watering, but that's not all.

I have two customers right across the street from each other, one yard is burnt, the other one isn't.
Both are watering, you want to know the difference?
I control the irrigation settings on the lush yard and we've been working on it for 3 years now.
They were my customers at another house before for several years as well, we know each other :p

So yeah, the customers of the burnt yard are watering, I keep telling them it's not enough.
This has been going on since late spring, but we've only been working on it since last fall.
That is how it is with a LOT of folks.

EVERYBODY wants a beautiful lawn, but poop in one hand and wish in the other.

MOST people haven't a CLUE what it takes to keep a yard green,
they can all do it in fall and spring but once that summer 100 degree
heat hits it sure separates the bunch.

That having been said...

If your cut height is below 4" that's not helping.
I cut the ones I can get away with it at 5.25", all the rest at 4"
but never do I cut it shorter.

The extra height helps a LOT.

Again, you need to raise your cut height and let it grow longer between cuts,
preferably before summer starts.

fastpine
06-26-2010, 09:16 PM
Outstanding topsites..Thanks amillion man!

I took samples of a fiew lawns and took em to the cooperative extension agent to get tested,,,the results will be back here in a bout a week.

Frue
06-26-2010, 09:29 PM
This is classic drought stress. Needs more water and less mowing. Topsite is corect when he says cut lawns higher BEFORE the onset of drought. WELCOME TO THE LAWN BIZ

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
06-26-2010, 10:11 PM
I also have a few customers who control their watering schedule as well and they just don't realize how much water is required when the temps here are above 90, I will ask them if they're watering and they say oh yeah the system comes on each station for 5 minutes, LOL, and I say how about 20....

Here's a link our city publishes to give people an idea of how much and when to water.

http://medfordwater.org/Files/New%20Sample%20Lawn%20Watering%20Schedule%20Dec.%2008.pdf

JohnBanks
06-26-2010, 10:37 PM
It is worse by the curb because of the extra heat of it also. Grubs are bad sometimes too.

fastpine
06-26-2010, 11:34 PM
good deal,,thanks a ton for the replys fellas...

So upping the watering should help bring it back?

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
06-26-2010, 11:43 PM
good deal,,thanks a ton for the replys fellas...

So upping the watering should help bring it back?

Coupled with the appropriate slow release summer blend fertilizer....

mbrew
06-27-2010, 12:16 AM
It is worse by the curb because of the extra heat of it also. Grubs are bad sometimes too.

I think so too, also some of that is a poor irrigation pattern.

Clark Griswold
06-27-2010, 07:51 AM
Don't worry it will turn bright green again just as soon as the nice & juicy crabgrass comes back in and if you didn't treat for it in the spring it will come right back as soon as the turf is stressed from drought, anytime now!

Clark

grassman177
06-27-2010, 08:25 AM
all i can say is get a pro in there to diagnose if it is a fungus, and if so, watering will only make it getmuch worse fast, it will need to be treated by a pro to cure it, and if they are that bad, they may need reseeding in fall. you must educate that it is not you making the lawn look so bad, unless it is! ahhah

terrapro
06-27-2010, 08:57 AM
Some of those pics absolutely look to be "prill poxs". What did you apply? I am assuming you applied in the heat and it was mowed soon before or soon after plus no water until the next morning.

fastpine
06-28-2010, 12:26 PM
I applied weed and feed..Made sure to use the propper setting...But, yes, all your assumptions are correct.

Kiril
06-28-2010, 01:06 PM
Looks like drought stress to me.

compaction + shallow rooting + poor irrigation DU + poor irrigation scheduling = brown out

You need to audit the sites with problems. An irrigation audit and soil audit are in order. Doesn't hurt to learn how to schedule irrigation properly either.

clean_cut
06-28-2010, 07:19 PM
http://www.turffiles.ncsu.edu/

This site is wonderful for many things about northern turf.

deere-man
06-28-2010, 09:26 PM
It's like MikeKLe said, when your mowing lawns without irrigation. If it hasn't grown, clients won't want it mowed, so 2-3 weeks is typical in the summer. Irrigated lawns are definitely the saving grace this time of year.

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
06-29-2010, 09:42 PM
Now here brings up a debate I'm sure, let me start by saying I'm no Turf Grass Expert by any means, but as far as Irrigation programming, I've always heard watering deep & Infrequent is best, but here with temps near 90 In my opinion I think the lawn needs a drink every single day.

What's your guys typical watering schedule for Standard Spray heads?

10 minutes per zone each day, etc, Start times, do You water half in morning and half in evening? Just trying to get an idea on what everyone else does and/or if My Schedule is best....

Thanks guys!!

twcw5804
06-29-2010, 09:48 PM
Fastpine, sorry if I missed it but are you certified for spraying chemicals?

Let me know if lawn test positive for nicotene :laugh:

puppypaws
06-29-2010, 10:11 PM
I will ASAP..The brown/dead spots resemble old school cammo pattern. and they seem to be starting from the tip of the blades and working down till the whole area is dead..

Multiple customers commented that they have been watering a ton, to no avail.....

The lawns having this problem, are they all watered heavily?

puppypaws
06-29-2010, 10:35 PM
The lawns having this problem, are they all watered heavily?

Too much water is what promotes fungus. You can also have different textures of soil, some areas may have a hard-pan that will not allow the irrigating water to penetrate. You can then be watering properly but have areas that are drought stricken because of water not becoming available to the root zone.

LKCLawnService
06-30-2010, 12:16 AM
I love my customers that dont water.....EASY $$$$

J & D Greens
06-30-2010, 03:44 AM
Now here brings up a debate I'm sure, let me start by saying I'm no Turf Grass Expert by any means, but as far as Irrigation programming, I've always heard watering deep & Infrequent is best, but here with temps near 90 In my opinion I think the lawn needs a drink every single day.

What's your guys typical watering schedule for Standard Spray heads?

10 minutes per zone each day, etc, Start times, do You water half in morning and half in evening? Just trying to get an idea on what everyone else does and/or if My Schedule is best....

Thanks guys!!

I don't subscribe to watering every day. A lot of us are under watering restrictions due to to much development in some cities. And even if there were no restrictions I believe you want to allow the lawn to go a day or two with out water to allow it dry out a little. Instead I would increase the time were the lawn gets sun most of the day.The start time is as early as possible after 2 a.m. (you want it to be finished before everyone needs to get ready for their day), also setting it so that when the cycle is finished it runs a second cycle soon after (always do this), this gets the water drawing down with the first cycle which creates a vacuum effect causing the water to push deeper into the ground with the second one. That will cause the roots to go deeper after the water. Right now I am watering 4-days and not watering 3.

I also believe that we should cut at the highest setting that still leaves a nice Finnish. I often double cut areas that are thinner and don't come out as good.

As for applying any weed and feed this time of year when the temps can exceed 90 degrees? A big no no. He should have feed the lawns and tried to spray the weeds not the whole lawn. From the looks of the Pics it looks like the lawn is burning where it is getting direct sun. But could also be other things like it is the time of year when the bugs in the ground would be hatching. To much water (which is does not sound like) fungi's.

There is way to much to learn about how to keep lawns looking nice than just cutting. And a person really needs things to the pro's (Fert. - irrigation) if he doesn't know what he is doing. You customers will understand if you only cut their lawns, just do a great job on them.

Kiril
06-30-2010, 11:31 AM
Now here brings up a debate I'm sure, let me start by saying I'm no Turf Grass Expert by any means, but as far as Irrigation programming, I've always heard watering deep & Infrequent is best, but here with temps near 90 In my opinion I think the lawn needs a drink every single day.

What's your guys typical watering schedule for Standard Spray heads?

10 minutes per zone each day, etc, Start times, do You water half in morning and half in evening? Just trying to get an idea on what everyone else does and/or if My Schedule is best....

Thanks guys!!

There are no answers to these questions. Each site needs to dealt with independently. Soil type, rooting depth, turf type, water quality, water restrictions, environment (ET, rain, microclimates, etc ... ), system efficiency and design, and so on ..... all these need to be considered when scheduling.

this gets the water drawing down with the first cycle which creates a vacuum effect causing the water to push deeper into the ground with the second one. That will cause the roots to go deeper after the water.

This is not how is works. Cycle and soak is something you do to prevent runoff on low permeability soil. There is no advantage to this type of scheduling other than that.

J & D Greens
07-01-2010, 03:22 AM
This is not how is works. Cycle and soak is something you do to prevent runoff on low permeability soil. There is no advantage to this type of scheduling other than that.[/QUOTE]

This is what three different books on the subject say to do. I don't just assume what works. and the customers that do this 3-4 days a week with minimal fertilizer have lush green grass. I know there are many variables in all lawn care but this is what works best for our dry climate with 90-100 degree temps. This would be good with any soil if you think about it.

Kiril
07-01-2010, 10:05 AM
This is what three different books on the subject say to do. I don't just assume what works. and the customers that do this 3-4 days a week with minimal fertilizer have lush green grass. I know there are many variables in all lawn care but this is what works best for our dry climate with 90-100 degree temps. This would be good with any soil if you think about it.

No offense J & D, but you need to check your references as I highly doubt they say what you stated in post #39, nor is this type of scheduling (cycle & soak) necessary when the zones precipitation rate is less than the soils infiltration rate.

FYI ... I have schedules running on fescue once every 4 days at ~70% ETo with same temps, no rain.

fastpine
07-01-2010, 10:15 AM
Dang, I have alooooot to learn..I think im going to take some classes over the winter.

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
07-01-2010, 11:13 AM
FYI ... I have schedules running on fescue once every 4 days at ~70% ETo with same temps, no rain.

Can you explain ~70% ETo Please?

Thanks

puppypaws
07-01-2010, 11:24 AM
No offense J & D, but you need to check your references as I highly doubt they say what you stated in post #39, nor is this type of scheduling (cycle & soak) necessary when the zones precipitation rate is less than the soils infiltration rate.

FYI ... I have schedules running on fescue once every 4 days at ~70% ETo with same temps, no rain.

Would you say the grass will tell you when it needs water? My thinking and I believe that of many professionals is that the grass should get just to the point of beginning drought stress (not hurting but moisture in the root zone becoming inadequate), then a good thorough soaking of the root zone should take place. This prevents fungus, which is promoted from too much watering at smaller amounts.

What are your thoughts on this? Some people think grass should be watered in smaller amounts each night, I contend the grass should dictate when water needs to be applied.

I have farmed for over 40 years, when a crop gets more water than it needs, feeder roots remain near the surface. When this takes place and a dry period comes into play the plants are more stressed than if they went through dryer periods where the roots were made to go deeper in search of moisture. Grass roots are the same, you keep more than an ample supply of moisture in the top one inch of soil the grass has a weaker root system. When you allow these roots to search for moisture it enables the plant to withstand much more adversity through a stronger growing system.

puppypaws
07-01-2010, 11:57 AM
Can you explain ~70% ETo Please?

Thanks

Plant water use is commonly explained in terms of a reference evapotranspiration (ETo) and crop coefficients. Evapotranspiration (ET) is by definition “the loss of water from a vegetated surface through the combined processes of soil evaporation and plant transpiration.”

He is applying water at a 70% rate of required amount based on plant species.

Kiril
07-01-2010, 12:12 PM
Can you explain ~70% ETo Please?

Thanks

ETo refers to reference evapotranspiration. Typically it is calculated for a well watered cool season grass (or alfalfa in which case it it ETr) maintained at a given height. It estimates a baseline for soil water loss due to plant water use and evaporation. It is primarily used with Ag, but is now seeing increased use with landscape irrigation (eg. smart controllers).

Basically you use ETo to estimate how much water is being lost from your soils, and how much is needed to bring the soil back to field capacity. You use a percentage of the ETo which is calculated using an appropriate Kc (crop coefficient) for each plant or plant group.

ETc = ETo x Kc (where ETc = estimated crop ET)

For example .... you can maintain a warm season turf at somewhere around 40-60% ETo, fescue at 65-80%, natives at 20-50%, and so on. Site conditions and management practices are important factors to consider when determining an appropriate crop coefficient.

Personally, I practice deficit irrigation, where I will allow soil moisture to fall to a given point at a given depth based on site conditions, soil type and structure, plant types and rooting depths, desired growth, etc ..... before bringing the soil back to field capacity. I monitor soil moisture directly to determine when to water ... and calculate an appropriate amount to apply based on many different factors .... including % ETo for each hydrozone. A properly designed irrigation system and landscape will be hydrozoned (i.e. zoned/grouped by similar water use). Each of these hydrozones will have a number of different variables which will affect irrigation scheduling ... including an appropriate percentage of ETo.

Kiril
07-01-2010, 12:26 PM
Would you say the grass will tell you when it needs water?

Yes .... and no. I do however use this method to determine problem spots ... but it is not something I would recommend doing on a regular basis.

My thinking and I believe that of many professionals is that the grass should get just to the point of beginning drought stress (not hurting but moisture in the root zone becoming inadequate), then a good thorough soaking of the root zone should take place. This prevents fungus, which is promoted from too much watering at smaller amounts.

Yes ..... deficit irrigation, which I strongly promote.

What are your thoughts on this? Some people think grass should be watered in smaller amounts each night, I contend the grass should dictate when water needs to be applied.

I do not support or feel it is necessary to syringe residential or commercial turf. There may be cases with sports turf where this can be beneficial, however all potential impacts should be carefully assessed before going down this road. Now if your trying to grow grass on pure sand .... then you may be forced to irrigate on a daily basis ... in which case you should be looking to increase your soil organic matter content.

I have farmed for over 40 years, when a crop gets more water than it needs, feeder roots remain near the surface.

As is the case with landscape plants as well ... especially in soils with high clay content and/or compacted soils.

When this takes place and a dry period comes into play the plants are more stressed than if they went through dryer periods where the roots were made to go deeper in search of moisture. Grass roots are the same, you keep more than an ample supply of moisture in the top one inch of soil the grass has a weaker root system. When you allow these roots to search for moisture it enables the plant to withstand much more adversity through a stronger growing system.

Roots don't search for moisture .... but rather will grow where conditions are conducive for root growth. Deeper rooting does lead to increased drought tolerance because the plant(s) have a greater volume of soil to extract water (and nutrients) from.

puppypaws
07-01-2010, 12:35 PM
ETo refers to reference evapotranspiration. Typically it is calculated for a well watered cool season grass (or alfalfa in which case it it ETr) maintained at a given height. It estimates a baseline for soil water loss due to plant water use and evaporation. It is primarily used with Ag, but is now seeing increased use with landscape irrigation (eg. smart controllers).

Basically you use ETo to estimate how much water is being lost from your soils, and how much is needed to bring the soil back to field capacity. You use a percentage of the ETo which is calculated using an appropriate Kc (crop coefficient) for each plant or plant group.

ETc = ETo x Kc (where ETc = estimated crop ET)

For example .... you can maintain a warm season turf at somewhere around 40-60% ETo, fescue at 65-80%, natives at 20-50%, and so on. Site conditions and management practices are important factors to consider when determining an appropriate crop coefficient.

Personally, I practice deficit irrigation, where I will allow soil moisture to fall to a given point at a given depth based on site conditions, soil type and structure, plant types and rooting depths, desired growth, etc ..... before bringing the soil back to field capacity. I monitor soil moisture directly to determine when to water ... and calculate an appropriate amount to apply based on many different factors .... including % ETo for each hydrozone. A properly designed irrigation system and landscape will be hydrozoned (i.e. zoned/grouped by similar water use). Each of these hydrozones will have a number of different variables which will affect irrigation scheduling ... including an appropriate percentage of ETo.

In laymen terms this is exactly what I said earlier, let the root zone dry to a certain point, then replenish the water supply thoroughly through a repetitive process based on moisture content.

The technical terminology which I understand very well can be a little confusing to some, but it does look good on paper.

Kiril
07-01-2010, 01:11 PM
In laymen terms this is exactly what I said earlier, let the root zone dry to a certain point, then replenish the water supply thoroughly through a repetitive process based on moisture content.

The technical terminology which I understand very well can be a little confusing to some, but it does look good on paper.

Damn .... and I thought I was putting it in layman terms. :laugh:

puppypaws
07-01-2010, 01:15 PM
Roots don't search for moisture .... but rather will grow where conditions are conducive for root growth. Deeper rooting does lead to increased drought tolerance because the plant(s) have a greater volume of soil to extract water (and nutrients) from.

That is not bad, not very many people can agree on 4 out of five things discussed, there is only one we can agree to disagree on.

You say "roots don't search for moisture....but rather will grow where conditions are conductive for root growth." The most important component to plant survival is water, when roots go down, or if not able to grow down, they then grow out, these roots are looking for their main survival component, water. These roots are not searching for major of minor elements, they are looking for what they realize must be utilized for their immediate survival and this is water.

You say roots do not search for water, I say roots move in search of their main survival component, which is water. I am throwing this out so people are able to see our difference in opinion and maybe better educate themselves as to what plant life needs and how they get this major component (water) to sustain life. This component can be given artifically, nature can provide this life sustaning element, or the plant will attempt to find it on its own by searching.

Kiril
07-01-2010, 01:37 PM
Root have requirements for growth ... water being one of the primary ones. Remove a primary requirement for root growth ... you will get no root growth. If you have a water table at 15", with a top down dry profile of 6" (dry being PWP) and a root zone depth of 5" .... the roots aren't going to go in search of the water 12" down .... because there is not sufficient water in the current root zone to support growth.

puppypaws
07-01-2010, 07:05 PM
Root have requirements for growth ... water being one of the primary ones. Remove a primary requirement for root growth ... you will get no root growth. If you have a water table at 15", with a top down dry profile of 6" (dry being PWP) and a root zone depth of 5" .... the roots aren't going to go in search of the water 12" down .... because there is not sufficient water in the current root zone to support growth.

I can agree, roots will only go down their genetically designed distance, and can go no further. I guess you could reckon this to a man walking across a desert in search of water, he can walk as long as his body is hydrated and capable. Once dehydration sets in he has a very short period of time to find water, when his body shuts down his life sustaining water may be out of reach only by arms length, but is still too far, making death imminent.

NEW CITY LAWN CARE LLC
07-01-2010, 10:38 PM
Good Information Guys, Thank You!

Ultra05
07-01-2010, 11:03 PM
I hope this is proper etiquette, but on a comm. lawn with no irrigation installed, is there a fert or something I can use to bring back a huge sunburn spot? Too far from any building to even use a hose. Is backpack watering even a viable option? SIA for the newbie questions...

fastpine
07-01-2010, 11:09 PM
Good Information Guys, Thank You!

Yeah,,seriously...These guys really know their stuff. I hope to be as educated about lawn growth as they are some day..

Update on the sunburned lawns....They are starting to come back to life thank God!!..The custys have been watering the problem spots and the temps have leveled out...

Thanks to all who offered good advise...:waving:

fastpine
07-01-2010, 11:10 PM
I hope this is proper etiquette, but on a comm. lawn with no irrigation installed, is there a fert or something I can use to bring back a huge sunburn spot? Too far from any building to even use a hose. Is backpack watering even a viable option? SIA for the newbie questions...

:laugh:..at eight pounds per gal,,,Im hope you have a strong back..

puppypaws
07-01-2010, 11:18 PM
I hope this is proper etiquette, but on a comm. lawn with no irrigation installed, is there a fert or something I can use to bring back a huge sunburn spot? Too far from any building to even use a hose. Is backpack watering even a viable option? SIA for the newbie questions...

You say huge, and if it is drought stress, water is your solution. You can go for the backpack sprayer deal, but plan on making many, many, many trips to fill up.

To give you and idea of how much work will be involved with a backpack sprayer, 1" of water on one sq. foot is about a half gallon of water. Say you have a 10' by 10' area that needs water, you need to apply 1" over the entire area. This means you would need 50 gallons of water for this small area. 10' x 10' = 100 sq. ft. which calculates to 50 gallons at 1/2 gal. per sq. ft.

cutterschoice24
07-01-2010, 11:37 PM
what you are talking about is called brown patch and it is a fungus it will spread fast lack of water and really hot temperatures is causing it I'm dealing with it here in FL aslo

Kiril
07-02-2010, 10:13 AM
I can agree, roots will only go down their genetically designed distance, and can go no further. I guess you could reckon this to a man walking across a desert in search of water, he can walk as long as his body is hydrated and capable. Once dehydration sets in he has a very short period of time to find water, when his body shuts down his life sustaining water may be out of reach only by arms length, but is still too far, making death imminent.

Genetic disposition aside, I would think a horse and carrot might be a better analogy. By allowing your soil profile to dry top down, you are "training" your roots to grow deeper as they will follow the water/conditions which are conducive to root growth.

Kiril
07-02-2010, 10:27 AM
I hope this is proper etiquette, but on a comm. lawn with no irrigation installed, is there a fert or something I can use to bring back a huge sunburn spot? Too far from any building to even use a hose. Is backpack watering even a viable option? SIA for the newbie questions...

Personally, I don't think backpacking water it is a viable option. You need to determine why the spot has developed. As mentioned, it might be something like summer patch or brown patch, or it might be related to soil conditions and/or site conditions. For example, compacted areas in turf will always brown out first (soil condition) or a west or south facing slope will dry faster (site condition). Differential soil water holding capacity is another ... and one of my favorites .... construction waste.

Point is .... if you have select areas that are browning out due to drought (i.e. you know it is not a disease) then you need determine what can be done with the soil to alleviate the problem.

Ultra05
07-03-2010, 08:12 PM
How can I best diagnose my probs? Cut out a 1'X1' and check under it? Soil sample? Rain dance? I'll start getting phone calls on this ASAP if I dont find a way. I"d even pay for a site that had a current database of LM issues I could refer to. Thanks for the help guys. Highly Determined Newbie

dtford
07-03-2010, 08:53 PM
I'm in Mass, we haven't had rain in (3) weeks, hot as hell. Don't like it, but I'm catching up on my pruning which is hard this time of year if the lawns are long. I've got customers who own boat yards and others who run pool businesses. (1) mans feast, is another mans famine. It is what it is

puppypaws
07-03-2010, 09:27 PM
How can I best diagnose my probs? Cut out a 1'X1' and check under it? Soil sample? Rain dance? I'll start getting phone calls on this ASAP if I dont find a way. I"d even pay for a site that had a current database of LM issues I could refer to. Thanks for the help guys. Highly Determined Newbie

You have a county extension service in your area that possibly has a turf grass specialist, if not they know what to do about getting your problem resolved.

Here I will get you started on the correct path:

•CONNECTICUT
•University of Connecticut - John Kaminski (Turfgrass Specialist)

puppypaws
07-03-2010, 09:39 PM
You have a county extension service in your area that possibly has a turf grass specialist, if not they know what to do about getting your problem resolved.

Here I will get you started on the correct path:

•CONNECTICUT
•University of Connecticut - John Kaminski (Turfgrass Specialist)

This gentleman no longer appears to be in this association. Pick out an extension agent from this site for your area. They will get a specialist to physically check your problem. Come back and let me know what it was.

http://www.extension.uconn.edu/pages/department/index.html

Ultra05
07-03-2010, 10:33 PM
Thank you puppypaws and I will let you know.

Kiril
07-04-2010, 11:50 AM
How can I best diagnose my probs? Cut out a 1'X1' and check under it? Soil sample? Rain dance? I'll start getting phone calls on this ASAP if I dont find a way. I"d even pay for a site that had a current database of LM issues I could refer to. Thanks for the help guys. Highly Determined Newbie

You need to do an audit of your soils and site conditions. I would start with soil samples + a general assessment of the soils + a general assessment of plant/root growth.

Hoy landscaping
07-04-2010, 10:39 PM
this is a natural phenomena called summer

topsites
07-04-2010, 10:52 PM
I'm in Mass, we haven't had rain in (3) weeks, hot as hell. Don't like it, but I'm catching up on my pruning which is hard this time of year if the lawns are long. I've got customers who own boat yards and others who run pool businesses. (1) mans feast, is another mans famine. It is what it is

Ain't that the truth, I got a couple of projects like yourself, not particular about
doing them in the heat but then grass cutting's out of the question, not sure
what's going on past those two-three things yet.

Just sux lol, every dang time I get a little bit ahead of the game SOMETHING's
got to come around and slap me right back down.

But as you said, it's just how it is.

brucec32
07-04-2010, 11:56 PM
Al tried to warn you, but did you listen? Nooooooo.