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View Full Version : MA- Need License for Dormant Oil Spray?


roscioli
07-24-2002, 01:47 PM
Hi guys- Does anybody know if I need a license to spray a dormant oil to kill Wooly Aldegid? (spelling, i know.) I tried the search, but couldnt find anything on this subject. It doenst seem like a real pesticide to me, and I picked some up at the store for the heck of it becuase there are cases very close to me, just getting ready. But, I need to know if I can do this for my business, because I know of at least 1 residence that I could get the job at. Also, what is a better way to spray it than using the cheesy sprayer built into the bottle (you know, the garden hose goes in one end, and the other end sprays). I dont have a license, so I dont have a sprayer. Can I use my pressure washer to get it high into trees? If not I can just advertise for Ornamentals, but I would love to do trees as well. Thanks, Sorry for the long post, Mike

PS- If someone could correct my spelling on Wooly Aldegid that would be great too!

ipm
07-24-2002, 08:06 PM
Are you talking about horticultural oils?
You need a pest license any time you are recieving a profit on a job.

Pressure washer NO. When you get your license you will learn what drift is.

roscioli
07-24-2002, 09:50 PM
Is that true? Does an oil count as a pesticide? I know what drift is buddy, I meant for wooded areas where drift will only come in contact with other hemlocks.. Thanks.

tremor
07-25-2002, 07:41 AM
Rascioli,

Any product, no matter how safe, organic, or dangerous, that is labled for the control (usually by death) of ANY pest, by any means, would be classified as a pesticide. Therefore by federal law, it must have an EPA registration number.

If it has a legal EPA Reg#, then the only legal definition that we are concerned with then is the "commercial application" of the pesticide. Meaning you don't own the property you're treating & you are engaged in the treatment for hire.

Some states interpret this a little differently with respect to using pesticides on property that belongs to your employer. Meaning that an apartment building janitor can (in some states), buy & apply pesticides such as a simple (non restricted use) 4-step program, retail crop sprays, wasp & hornet aeresols, etc, & use them on his employers grounds & buildings. This varies by state so if anyone thinks this applies to them, call your state regulatory body & ask. Don't assume that your employer knows.

Since it is highly unlikely that your customers have a 1099 or W2 on you, then yes, even oils & all other bio-rational & reduced risk/organic compounds meet the definition of a commercial pesticide application in every state in the nation.

This link will highlight the points of Mass. law, & should steer you in the right direction. Any good commercial supplier of the products you need should also be able to help you out with this. You can also click on my Homepage (www button down below this post), & use the Zip Code locator for a branch near you that can help.

http://www.umassgreeninfo.org/programs/pest_exams.html

Good Luck,

Steve

roscioli
07-25-2002, 10:18 AM
Tremor- Thank You. Somebody on this website that actually helps. There are so many in the Lawn Care Forum, but nobody checks this one. I appreciate the help, and someone that actually knows from experience and is not just here to criticize. Based on your response I will probably save myself from a hefty fine for simply not realizing the classifications of pesticides. Again, I appreciate the info, The new Lesco site looks great, and I will try to get into Worcester sometime to visit my nearest store. Thanks, Mike

A1 Lawn@Landscapes
07-25-2002, 07:15 PM
Mike,

Try Valley Green on Sutton Road in Oxford. Rt 395 exit 5 towards oxford. On your right right after Railroad tracks. It is staffed by ex-Lesco guys. very knowledgable and closer than lesco. They carry just about everything. Excellent prices. Most of the guys out my way go there.


Kerry