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Coach s
07-05-2010, 02:14 PM
Hey All,
I am looking for some help on best way to remove large areas of English Ivy. Three areas are about 30 Ft. by 50 feet.
I was thinking that I would spray with strongest roundup available then a week later try to remove ivy. For the removal I am not sure whether to rent a tiller or a walk behind Dingo. What do you guys think would be the best way to do the job?

Thanks for all of your help!

White Gardens
07-06-2010, 09:24 AM
A garden rake and pruners.

Wait two to three weeks though, you'll get a better kill that way and hopefully the roots will have broken down just a tad, so you can pull it easier.

Don't use a tiller, your asking for problems with wrapping the ivy around the tines.

What is the plan for the area after you kill it off?

Littlea
07-06-2010, 01:16 PM
Depending on where you are, you may be able to get a BOXER mini-skid from The Home Depot. They have an array of attachments that will eat it up. Personally, I would posion is prescribed then just tear it out with a bucket.

Littlea
07-06-2010, 01:54 PM
He is right... You will be cleaning tines every 2 minutes. Use a bucket and just take the top layer of dirt and roots with you.

Coach s
07-06-2010, 03:58 PM
I just sprayed the areas really good with roundup.
I think that I will hit it again in a week.
Then wait another week or so and then get Ding with bucket and scrape top layer away.
In the fall I am bringing in some new top soil and then planting grass.

White Gardens
07-06-2010, 10:51 PM
Dingo is overkill, what are you planning on doing to the bed after the ivy is gone.

Tq23
07-09-2010, 10:31 PM
How is the project going?

Tq23
07-09-2010, 10:34 PM
I was trying to kill some ivy growing and had no luck with roundup. I mixed it at 4 ounces per gallon of water and it did absolutely nothing to the ivy, all the weeds growing in the ivy are now dead, but didn't even yellow the ivy. Considering what the next step will be in trying to remove this stuff.

White Gardens
07-09-2010, 10:51 PM
I was trying to kill some ivy growing and had no luck with roundup. I mixed it at 4 ounces per gallon of water and it did absolutely nothing to the ivy, all the weeds growing in the ivy are now dead, but didn't even yellow the ivy. Considering what the next step will be in trying to remove this stuff.

I've had luck with Roundup and English Ivy. How long ago did you make the application?

Tq23
07-10-2010, 11:54 AM
I've had luck with Roundup and English Ivy. How long ago did you make the application?

It has been about 2 weeks
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White Gardens
07-10-2010, 07:30 PM
It has been about 2 weeks
Posted via Mobile Device

I'd give it three and re-apply if necessary. Glyphs take up to two weeks to work and sometimes three for heavily rooted plants.

stevij
07-11-2010, 03:13 PM
is what you guys call english ivy the broad leaved hedera helix? usually find it takes two good apps of roundup and then a lot of hard work with a spade and fork. wouldnt reccomend using a tiller, spend too much time unwrapping tines and it can cause spreading of the plants little aerial roots on the stems if any survive the roundup.

Coach s
07-12-2010, 05:57 PM
It's been 5 days since I sprayed round-up. Not noticing that it did much to the ivy. I will wait a couple more days and then spray again. I am leaning toward
using shovels, rakes and just good old man power pulling the ivy out. We are going to try a section next week and see how it goes.

White Gardens
07-12-2010, 11:05 PM
It's been 5 days since I sprayed round-up. Not noticing that it did much to the ivy. I will wait a couple more days and then spray again. I am leaning toward
using shovels, rakes and just good old man power pulling the ivy out. We are going to try a section next week and see how it goes.

Ya, you have fun with that.

You need to wait two weeks for any results from the roundup. 5 days isn't enough.

Killing it first is go to loosen the roots for you and make your job easier.

I've asked twice now, but what is the goal. Just ripping it out, or are you landscaping the area. That is something to know in order to give you the correct advice. Basically your outcome is going to dictate how you start.

cutbetterthanyou
07-13-2010, 09:09 PM
I haven't needed to try it yet, but my local lesco told me you need a chemical with diquat in it (razor burn).They said that glyphosate (roundup) can't penatrate the waxy leaves to get to the actually plant. You need the diquat to burn thru the waxy part tnen the gly can work.

Think Green
07-13-2010, 11:05 PM
Coach,
Do you have a heavy-good running line trimmer?? We have taken our commercial line trimmers with 0.95 line, using face shield or safety glasses and went through a bed.
It takes out about 80% to the nub. Rake out the remains......put in a bag and sell to someone for cuttings. Diquat Dibromide(Reward) is pricey so be aware. Razor Burn which is Glyophosate and Diquat combined will speed up the kill rate. Diquat is a quick contact herbicide and the gly is slower. The leaves will be effected usually in 24 hours after spraying with good kill in a week.
We run a front tine tiller after the majority of the ivy is cut down and raked out. Rake again to get the nodes and runner.........root balls too. Make sure you are aware of irrigation pipes, water lines, electrical-utility lines buried nearby--- always....!!!!!!!
After all is cleared and leveled back out, respray any shoots that should come back in a couple of weeks. You will eventually get all the ivy but it will take time.

JNyz
07-14-2010, 09:49 PM
I agree with Think Green for the second time today. You can tell who has experience in landscaping and who doesn't. Line trimmers and a face shield will do the trick in about 1 hour and then another to clean up. I would skip the gly and just seed if you need to. If you take it all the way down to the ground it will not come back.

Coach s
07-14-2010, 11:04 PM
All great advice. Thank you all very much!
I am sorry that I forgot to mention that eventually, probably in the fall the owner would like to grow grass in these areas where the ivy was.
I was wondering will the roundup cause any problem trying to grass two months from now?
Again thanks for all the help.

White Gardens
07-15-2010, 12:09 AM
All great advice. Thank you all very much!
I am sorry that I forgot to mention that eventually, probably in the fall the owner would like to grow grass in these areas where the ivy was.
I was wondering will the roundup cause any problem trying to grass two months from now?
Again thanks for all the help.

No, no problem at all.

Mahoney3223
08-07-2012, 11:15 PM
I'm doing a similar job and I use brush killer wait a week, brush killer/round up/diquat wait a week, rip it out with skid, spray roundup/surflan (water it in or surflan won't work) then wait a week, topsoil grade seed straw. some say overkill i say no ivy and green grass in a month. i've done many this way. better safe than a rep as a hack who can't kill ivy!

JNyz
08-08-2012, 12:54 PM
How do you do it if you can't get the loader into the yard?

recycledsole
08-11-2012, 12:41 AM
Do you guys know about Monsanto, who makes roundup? if not you should really research it. its not worth the money to pollute our next generations land

the best and easiest way would be to pen some goats up in there and let them eat away the ivy and other weeds- creates fertilizer , creates healthy fertilizer. no emissions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0uls507hvM

cgaengineer
08-11-2012, 05:45 AM
Do you guys know about Monsanto, who makes roundup? if not you should really research it. its not worth the money to pollute our next generations land

the best and easiest way would be to pen some goats up in there and let them eat away the ivy and other weeds- creates fertilizer , creates healthy fertilizer. no emissions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0uls507hvM

Are you serious? You must be a troll.

If a customer told me they wanted me to get rid of ivy and I told them I would use goats I would not only lose that customer but I would be the laughing stock of the state. I can just see an illegal goat pen in a high end subdivision with illegal farm animals in it.
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cgaengineer
08-11-2012, 05:53 AM
Excuse me while I install this pen around your $500,000 house. I'll get rid of your ivy, don't mind the shrub damage from the goats...they should come back. Oh sorry, didn't know you wanted to keep the bark on that Japanese maple specimen.
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JNyz
08-11-2012, 07:47 AM
Haha lmao,

By the way isn't gly a contact and not a systemic?

jsslawncare
08-11-2012, 09:23 AM
Are you serious? You must be a troll.

If a customer told me they wanted me to get rid of ivy and I told them I would use goats I would not only lose that customer but I would be the laughing stock of the state. I can just see an illegal goat pen in a high end subdivision with illegal farm animals in it.
Posted via Mobile Device

I agree and I can see it now-
"I told the goats what they could and couldn't eat. It's not my fault they ate your wicker patio set."
We went from lawn pro's to goat whispering.

Peachtree Environmental
08-11-2012, 03:05 PM
Tq23, I've had the same situation. I went high rate and did not phase the ivy. However, it did kill all of the other weeds and the bed actually looks clean and nice again. Initially planned to kill the ivy and replant bed. Now we just maintain the bed.

gimpy252
08-11-2012, 11:52 PM
The goats are a great idea. Many homeowners are open to a more green solution. Offer it as an option, otherwise rip the ivy out, seed the area and use a good broadleaf herb next year on any sprouts that come up.

ReddensLawnCare
08-12-2012, 12:05 AM
I'm surprised this was never brought up, but a good sod cutter works excellent for ivy beds. I have used it on English ivy, pachasandra, this areas is Virginia creeper, and some other form of small leaf ivy
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knox gsl
08-12-2012, 12:57 AM
In the past I have had good results with mowing it to the ground and slit seeding over it. No chemicals or goats. This will not work if you are trying to maintain this as a flower or planting bed. Ivy does not like to be mowed weekly and will quickly give up. BTW roundup is just a minor inconvience to an English Ivy patch,

MV Property Care
08-12-2012, 02:54 AM
I was trying to kill some ivy growing and had no luck with roundup. I mixed it at 4 ounces per gallon of water and it did absolutely nothing to the ivy, all the weeds growing in the ivy are now dead, but didn't even yellow the ivy. Considering what the next step will be in trying to remove this stuff.

What percentage of glyphosphate was on the bottle of roundup. I shop around and look for a percentage of at least 40%.

I was very successful killing ivy with "roundup" that is what everybody calls it but every dist,retailer has their own brand.

MV Property Care
08-12-2012, 02:58 AM
It's been 5 days since I sprayed round-up. Not noticing that it did much to the ivy. I will wait a couple more days and then spray again. I am leaning toward
using shovels, rakes and just good old man power pulling the ivy out. We are going to try a section next week and see how it goes.

We also use a stihl kombi hedge trimming where you can basically cut up the ivy and then apply roundup. It's like putting the poison right into the body of the plant.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 07:20 AM
The goats are a great idea. Many homeowners are open to a more green solution. Offer it as an option, otherwise rip the ivy out, seed the area and use a good broadleaf herb next year on any sprouts that come up.

Goats are a terrible idea. Goats are for pastures. Goats are not even a "green" option for a home lawn.
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Think Green
08-12-2012, 10:09 AM
Haha lmao,

By the way isn't gly a contact and not a systemic?

UUUH OOOH!
Misinformation.
Glyphosate is a systemic-non selective herbicide.
Why would you not think that this material is used to control the root as well and the plant???
Glyphosate's mode of action is to inhibit an enzyme involved in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids: tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine. It is absorbed through foliage and translocated to growing points. Because of this mode of action, it is only effective on actively growing plants; it is not effective as a pre-emergence herbicide.
If you sprayed a desirable turfgrass with roundup then a few days later you will see that the overspray will absorb inward and kill the surrounding areas of the turfgrass. Ivy is a bit more tougher to control than using glyphosate alone.

cgaengineer
08-12-2012, 12:50 PM
UUUH OOOH!
Misinformation.
Glyphosate is a systemic-non selective herbicide.
Why would you not think that this material is used to control the root as well and the plant???
Glyphosate's mode of action is to inhibit an enzyme involved in the synthesis of the aromatic amino acids: tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine. It is absorbed through foliage and translocated to growing points. Because of this mode of action, it is only effective on actively growing plants; it is not effective as a pre-emergence herbicide.
If you sprayed a desirable turfgrass with roundup then a few days later you will see that the overspray will absorb inward and kill the surrounding areas of the turfgrass. Ivy is a bit more tougher to control than using glyphosate alone.

Goats are non-selective... ;)
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Smallaxe
08-13-2012, 09:28 AM
Hey gaengineer, what wrong with goats??? I'm thinking about goats for my place, if I ever get time for the fences and go goat shopping... I have plenty of places for them to clean and keep clean, so my plan is rotating overgrown brush thick pastures... :)

ReddensLawnCare
08-13-2012, 02:19 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tsldULFSROc
Everyone get your order in!

cgaengineer
08-13-2012, 07:01 PM
Hey gaengineer, what wrong with goats??? I'm thinking about goats for my place, if I ever get time for the fences and go goat shopping... I have plenty of places for them to clean and keep clean, so my plan is rotating overgrown brush thick pastures... :)

Everything is wrong when using them in a 25-50k landscape!
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Smallaxe
08-14-2012, 09:10 AM
Everything is wrong when using them in a 25-50k landscape!
Posted via Mobile Device

Oh,,, I thot they were just going over to cleanup the ivy and fertilize the bed... :)

In reality, I imagine, they'd get sick of the ivy pretty quick...

ron mexico75
08-14-2012, 09:58 AM
I used these 2 and had great easy results. I kept cutting down into the dirt with the blade. Raked everything out and haven't had an issue since.



http://www.southernstates.com/catalog/images/Product/medium/11103252.jpg

http://imgc.classistatic.com/cps/poc/120724/437r1/4674mi9_26.jpeg

Busa Dave
08-14-2012, 11:50 AM
The easiest way is to cut the ivy at the ground (the bigger the stems the better) then on the exposed ends spray the highest concentration of 2,4 D directly on the freshly cut area. Do it again in a day or 2 and it will kill the plant.

I just put the undiluted chemical in a spray bottle and do it by hand. We had a stem that was almost 4 inches around and drilled a small hole .5 with a drill and filled it up with the 2, 4 D (not even .25 of an oz) and it never showed any signs of life again..

recycledsole
08-14-2012, 09:30 PM
ok guys, please research monsanto and 'roundup'

cgaengineer
08-14-2012, 09:40 PM
ok guys, please research monsanto and 'roundup'

Please research the slandering of a chemical company.
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ReddensLawnCare
08-14-2012, 10:43 PM
Most people know Monsanto has done some pretty bad things, and treated people in some pretty bad ways, however, they have also created the most cost efficient herbicide that is readily available on todays current market. Was there anything about monsanto that you would like to know? I did a 20 page paper on them for a research writing class in college.