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View Full Version : Was this year tough for new lawns?


GWhunter
07-12-2010, 12:28 PM
I like many others here who started a new lawn this spring seem to be having mixed results. I knew that spring lawns tend to not have as good or results as fall lawns. So I had about 75% sucess with my hydro seeded mix or Kbb,PR, and chewings Fescue. I had real poor temps and rain fall right after seeding. So it was a bit slower than I expected, but the area's that got 50% shade are great and the full sun area's were lookinh alot thinner. So I increased watering in these area's. It really didn't help and then came the weed's

So I decided since the cost was about the same to give Trugreen a try. Only for liquid weed an seed though. But I'm starting to get quick browning in area's that were doing very well. I've continued to water but cut back the time since I was noticing mushrooms if I left the sprinklers on too long.

So I know there isn't any real changes I can make now until late August. But I want to control the bleeding at least in the good area's. In the fall I was planning to lightly Harley rake the bad spots and add just a bit more topsoil( I feel these area's may have been too compacted since it's where I operated my tractor that seem to be problematic)an then resees heavy with the best quality KBB I can find. My question is this, will there be enough time for the KBB to establish itself thick before the fall? Theses area's are the highest traffic so maybe tall fescue and KBB is the best choice? I'm looking for a great looking green,health lawn. I'm willing to do what ever it takes to get it. The only thing I won't be adding is irrigation. I should have in the beginning but just couldn't afford the additional cost. Now I just don't want the added maintenace of it now. I'm willing to drag out the sprinklers where ever they need to go though. Sorry for this longwinded post.

Matt

ChiTownAmateur
07-12-2010, 03:03 PM
when the shady areas do well and the sunny ones do not it tells you that you did not apply enough water and keep those areas wet enough in relation to the ones that did well

in fall when you overseed those areas you must make a better effort to water the sunnier areas better...more frequently or have more/better mulch to cover it

for now watering keeps it green and prevents you from losing your work so far. in fall you will get it germinating and growing, don't worry too much if it comes in full or not by end of fall. what is important is to get it established, then in spring it will get an entire extra season to grow and fill in...spring is your goal for next year...prepped by doing things right in fall. fall is such a great growing season there's a good chance it will fill in by the end of it, but don't make that your pass/fail test

GWhunter
07-12-2010, 03:49 PM
It's not lack of water that caused the issue. The reason I know this is because the water would run off rather than penetrate the surface. I appreciate your reply though.

Matt

RigglePLC
07-12-2010, 10:41 PM
Good grass in shade is because it was protected from the hot sun. Perhaps your soil was so high in clay water ran off instead of penetrating into the root zone. (In which case you should water--wait an hour --and water again--until the soil is fully wet). For best results install irrigation--if not a battery operated water timer or two are the best method.
A high quality blue /rye mixture would be a good bet. Begin when temps fall below 80 during the day. And when soil temp is still high for fast germination. About mid -August.

Turboguy
07-12-2010, 10:56 PM
It's not lack of water that caused the issue. The reason I know this is because the water would run off rather than penetrate the surface. I appreciate your reply though.

Matt

That doesn't necessarily mean it wasn't a lack of water, perhaps the water was being applied faster than the ground could absorb it. Was it a sprinkler system or hand watered? How many times a day?

GWhunter
07-12-2010, 11:52 PM
The area with poor growth is much more compacted than the other area's. I feel this was the main issue. I'm going to lightly harley the surface and add maybe a topdress of soil. Then I'll reseed and be diligent with the water. The area also has a slight pitch to it. The shady spots do not further allowing water to stand and be absorbed. It's tower sprinklers I'm using and I have a ground level soaker type if the ground isn't getting wet enough. I'm going to add grub control soon. Should I let Trugreen due it(for $100) or do it myself.
They say there's kills and prevents VS the grub X which they say just kills.

Matt

ChiTownAmateur
07-13-2010, 07:44 PM
You are a bit quick to discount what i believe are the realities

compaction could very well be a problem where the tractor was but that alone should not prevent the grass from coming up at all. more than likely it would cause it to die off quickly after germinating because the roots cannot dig deep enough to get more water

but if the grass never really came in at all the problem is that the areas were drying out in between waterings. compacted soil makes wetting the soil more difficult but would not prevent the surface from being wet. but a lack of mulch or frequent enough waterings would cause the problem. I would guess with what I think is 95% accuracy that your rye grass came in, maybe some fescue, and the kbg never germinated because you stopped watering the area too soon

core aeration is the solution to the compacted area. but aerating alone will not guarantee that your grass will come up, that has more to do with the water than you might think. bluegrass can take what seems like forever to germinate, and even when it does it then grows fairly slowly compared to the other types until it is more mature.

Turboguy
07-13-2010, 10:29 PM
I hydroseed up to a couple of million sq. ft. of lawns a year and have for a long time. I seed all year starting from when the snow stops until it is ready to start. I have seen exactly what is being discussed here lots of times in my lawns planted in the hottest part of summer and personally I think ChiTown is 100% on the money.

GWhunter
07-13-2010, 10:56 PM
I'm not discounting your hypothosis. What your not hearing is that in the first week after seeding I noticed the moisture content being less and increased the watering substantially in thes area's. But the results lean more towards compaction. Reason being, the area is rectangular in shape, about 60'x40'. I have two strips of 55'x7'. One was washed out right after seeding so the mulch and seed pooled in lines as the water carried it. The other area is the main traffic path. So the entire area(60'x40') gets the same sun and water. But only these two area's are problematic. Thinking back to spreading the topsoil, I realize theses area's are also the shallowest. So that's not helping. I never said the grass didn't come up, It's just not as thick and looks to be mostly PR. I agree that watering is a critical componet of success. But since the first week I've come close to over watering this area's with no improvement.

What are thought on the grub control. Trugreen is supposed to be out this week so I need to make a decision soon. One thing I am guilty of is being too impatient with the results. I know great lawns aren't an overnight accomplishment.

Matt

lawns Etc
07-13-2010, 11:35 PM
It seems like you don't want a professionals opinion. You need to water long enough to penetrate the soil runoff will happen on compacted soil but enough water and it will penetrate. What you need is deep aeration along with fall seeding. Also measure your soil PH if its under 6.5. You need lime. There are lots of knowledgeable people here that give good advice.
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GWhunter
07-14-2010, 10:25 PM
Why does it appear I don't want a pro's advise. I believe someone who's handle say amateur is not a pro right? I'm hearing what is being said. How ever I was water to the point where seed was washing away. So it's kind of hard to know the reasons with never seeing the lawn right? I'm looking for opinions on the grub control at this point.

Matt:dizzy:

RigglePLC
07-14-2010, 11:05 PM
Tru Green claims to both kill and prevent. Maybe, but your Grub-X is probably very similar in active ingredient. (Scotts used imidicloprid last year, but renently changed the active ingredient a slightly better product Chlorthalonitrile or something like that). It should work fine--and cost you about 19.99.
Kill weeds now so weed control will not interfere with mid-August seeding. Shop for some high-quality fert with slow release of about 7 to 20 percent. Apply now, at seeding and again in October.
Shop for high-quality seed--something with 0.01 weed seed or less. About 20 percent rye like Silver Dollar, and a top-quality blue like Courtyard.

ChiTownAmateur
07-15-2010, 03:54 PM
Why does it appear I don't want a pro's advise. I believe someone who's handle say amateur is not a pro right? I'm hearing what is being said. How ever I was water to the point where seed was washing away. So it's kind of hard to know the reasons with never seeing the lawn right? I'm looking for opinions on the grub control at this point.

Matt:dizzy:

You don't know what went wrong yet are sure when a hydroseeder confirms the diagnosis that our opinion is wrong?

Strange way to go about things.