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jiggz
07-21-2010, 01:24 PM
i want to look up some advice on pruning before i just go cutting.. i see these multi stemmed shrubs alot and i always forget to ask the name..

heres the tree
http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/xxxjiggzxxx/tree.jpg

and the shrub
http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/xxxjiggzxxx/shrub.jpg

http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i50/xxxjiggzxxx/shrub2.jpg

thanks in advance

Mark Oomkes
07-21-2010, 01:47 PM
Seriously?

No wonder this industry isn't viewed as professional.

Could I suggest you go find the local extension office\ag school\something and take a plant ID course.

And yes, I do know what they are.

starry night
07-21-2010, 01:54 PM
Seriously?

No wonder this industry isn't viewed as professional.

Could I suggest you go find the local extension office\ag school\something and take a plant ID course.

And yes, I do know what they are.

I was thinking this same thing, Mark. And even if they can be identified doesn't mean you will know how to trim them.

ICT Bill
07-21-2010, 02:06 PM
I also think it would be important to know what you are about to do surgery on and when is the best time to do it. The forsythia for instance should be trimmed after it bloomed, do it now and it probably won't get many if any flowers in the spring

the weeping willow should be left to grow

do a little research it is very easy with the internet or better yet buy a book and keep it with you to identify plants and shrubs as you go through your weekly route

Tony Clifton
07-21-2010, 02:11 PM
Take it easy on the guy, he came on a "professional" forum and asked a question. Why are you persecuting him, at least he didn't go out and just start hacking. Everyone has to start somewhere.

ZKSLAWN
07-21-2010, 02:34 PM
Take it easy on the guy, he came on a "professional" forum and asked a question. Why are you persecuting him, at least he didn't go out and just start hacking. Everyone has to start somewhere.

I agree.. see if he went out and killed the plant and came on here asking why it died than maybe you can give him some s**t but he asked first and he's obviously asking cuz he wants to learn. Nothing wrong with learing on this forum this is where i've learned almost everything.

Mark Oomkes
07-21-2010, 03:16 PM
Maybe so, but I really think something as basic as a willow and forsythia ought to be fairly common knowledge if you're "in the industry".

I'll give him the benefit of the doubt and apologize. The suggestion to take a plant ID course stands.

ZKSLAWN
07-21-2010, 05:17 PM
Maybe so, but I really think something as basic as a willow and forsythia ought to be fairly common knowledge if you're "in the industry".

I'll give him the benefit of the doubt and apologize. The suggestion to take a plant ID course stands.


I knew the first one not the second myself but im taking that course this yr.
and your deff right about that.

Kiril
07-21-2010, 05:49 PM
Seriously?

No wonder this industry isn't viewed as professional.

Could I suggest you go find the local extension office\ag school\something and take a plant ID course.

And yes, I do know what they are.

Well .... isn't that mighty christian of ya.

Perhaps you would like to point out the identifying characteristics of these two plants per the posted pics .... then provide their latin name.

Mark Oomkes
07-21-2010, 06:01 PM
Well .... isn't that mighty christian of ya.

Perhaps you would like to point out the identifying characteristics of these two plants per the posted pics .... then provide their latin name.

Thanks.....

Landscape Poet
07-21-2010, 06:03 PM
better yet buy a book and keep it with you to identify plants and shrubs as you go through your weekly route

Best advice I have seen in this thread. Same goes with weeds, if guys would just buy a book or two from the county extension, would save a lot of space being taking up on LS from these type of threads.

Kiril
07-21-2010, 06:08 PM
Thanks.....

I see .... so in fact, you can't provide the necessary information to correctly ID the plants in the photos with a key. So that makes you what exactly?

Kiril
07-21-2010, 06:10 PM
Best advice I have seen in this thread. Same goes with weeds, if guys would just buy a book or two from the county extension, would save a lot of space being taking up on LS from these type of threads.

Perhaps a simple photo book of most common landscape plants in your region ... but a proper key? :dizzy: Not likely.

Mark Oomkes
07-21-2010, 08:50 PM
I see .... so in fact, you can't provide the necessary information to correctly ID the plants in the photos with a key. So that makes you what exactly?

Someone who can ID the plants because I have taken plant ID classes and have been in the industry for a couple weeks.

Like I said, I apologize, no go harass some other religious, right wing wacko.

1993lx172
07-21-2010, 09:08 PM
For the willow I'd trim off the dead branches and trim them up so that they aren't covering those evergreens and maybe trim them so that the branches are off the ground so its easier to mow under them.

Florida Gardener
07-21-2010, 10:42 PM
I'm with Mike, get an id book and keep it on you while you are working. I bought a weed id book from UF IFAS and it has become very handy. A plant id course is a great idea as you will learn most plants for your region. This site is for helping each other. If you can't do that, don't post.

1993lx172
07-22-2010, 01:03 AM
Can someone just answer a question with out tearing the person asking a new one? How many of you all wished you had a place like this to come and get information so that you could do the job RIGHT THE FIRST TIME when you were starting out. You guys, the "Old Guard" if you will are key to making sure the new generation have a place to turn to for real world experience when needed. This guy needs it, why don't you give it. You all want to make this industry better, here's a good place to start. (Steps down from soap box.)

integrityman
07-22-2010, 01:28 AM
the weeping willow should be left to grow



Ditch the damn willow! Their a terrible and messy tree,

Mark Oomkes
07-22-2010, 06:39 AM
Can someone just answer a question with out tearing the person asking a new one? How many of you all wished you had a place like this to come and get information so that you could do the job RIGHT THE FIRST TIME when you were starting out. You guys, the "Old Guard" if you will are key to making sure the new generation have a place to turn to for real world experience when needed. This guy needs it, why don't you give it. You all want to make this industry better, here's a good place to start. (Steps down from soap box.)

Can someone read the rest of the replies?

Kiril
07-22-2010, 07:49 AM
Can someone read the rest of the replies?

Can you provide the OP the necessary info to properly key the plants in the photo and provide the proper latin name? After all, you did take a plant ID course .... didn't you?

PerfectEarth
07-22-2010, 09:02 AM
Good Lord.... all you "he's just a new guy, help him out" apologists....only encouraging the lack of training, knowledge, and professionalism in OUR industry.

I've said it before a dozen times, and I'll say it again- Work for an established landscape company and LEARN - BEFORE you venture out on your own with not a clue as to what you are doing. This is plant ID and maintenance 101... I can maybe see not knowing the forsythia out of bloom, but a weeping willow?? Work for a company and learn before starting a "landscape" company.

It would be like me going on a plumber's forum and saying, " Hey! I'm a plumber. Here's a picture of a clogged toilet in a customer's bathroom. What do I do?"

I'm all for constructive assistance and maybe not jumping down someone's throat, but we gotta call a spade a spade.

Kiril
07-22-2010, 09:09 AM
Good Lord.... all you "he's just a new guy, help him out" apologists....only encouraging the lack of training, knowledge, and professionalism in OUR industry.

I've said it before a dozen times, and I'll say it again- Work for an established landscape company and LEARN - BEFORE you venture out on your own with not a clue as to what you are doing. This is plant ID and maintenance 101... I can maybe see not knowing the forsythia out of bloom, but a weeping willow?? Work for a company and learn before starting a "landscape" company.

It would be like me going on a plumber's forum and saying, " Hey! I'm a plumber. Here's a picture of a clogged toilet in a customer's bathroom. What do I do?"

I'm all for constructive assistance and maybe not jumping down someone's throat, but we gotta call a spade a spade.


Really dude? So you can positively ID any plant? We already have one guy here that can't provide any useful information with respect to keying out the plants in the pics, or even provide a proper scientific name ... and yet feels it is appropriate to belittle the OP.

Perhaps we should have a little plant ID test ..... heh? I have yet to see anyone provide any useful information here ... especially in the area concerning proper methods of plant identification. Any of you critics want to put your money where your mouth is?

Mark Oomkes
07-22-2010, 09:20 AM
Can you provide the OP the necessary info to properly key the plants in the photo and provide the proper latin name? After all, you did take a plant ID course .... didn't you?

Really dude? So you can positively ID any plant? We already have one guy here that can't provide any useful information with respect to keying out the plants in the pics, or even provide a proper scientific name ... and yet feels it is appropriate to belittle the OP.

Perhaps we should have a little plant ID test ..... heh? I have yet to see anyone provide any useful information here ... especially in the area concerning proper methods of plant identification. Any of you critics want to put your money where your mouth is?

You caught me, I'm really a 15 YO girl in Miami giving advice over the internet.

gunsnroses
07-22-2010, 09:39 AM
194803........

Kiril
07-22-2010, 09:40 AM
You caught me, I'm really a 15 YO girl in Miami giving advice over the internet.

What advice? You can't even answer what should be a relatively simple question for you .... you know ... given you took a course in plant identification. Since you are such a season veteran and a master at plant ID, here are a couple of easy ones for you to ID (proper scientific name) ... and much better pics I might add. These are not my pics and I will disclose the source once our plant ID experts have a whirl at it.

Kiril
07-22-2010, 09:47 AM
194803........

No .... this is more like it.

http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=4382766522092008539

gunsnroses
07-22-2010, 10:03 AM
No .... this is more like it.

http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=4382766522092008539

wow! how bout that guy.


I would be happy to id...but I don't want to spoil your fun.

Harley-D
07-22-2010, 10:55 AM
Second-Lavandula angustifolia or English Lavader but pics not real good so hard to tell. That's my guess there.

First-Maybe Korean Bell flower. A little further away would help. No idea and if these are native to California, there's no way i'm getting them because i've never been west of the Mississippi to see or study. I'll post a couple of east coast for you and see what you have to offer.

Harley-D
07-22-2010, 11:04 AM
These shouldn't be too hard for any east coaster. They're not simple but recognizable. I would put up my knowledge of trees and shrubs on east coast plants just not total domestic US. Too many. Anybody got any good east coast pics to ID? There should be a thread just for plant ID. New plant everyday, trees, shrubs, but no perrenials or annuals. The list would be enormous.

Kiril
07-22-2010, 07:43 PM
Second-Lavandula angustifolia or English Lavader but pics not real good so hard to tell. That's my guess there.

First-Maybe Korean Bell flower. A little further away would help. No idea and if these are native to California, there's no way i'm getting them because i've never been west of the Mississippi to see or study. I'll post a couple of east coast for you and see what you have to offer.

Nope. Plants in the genus of both photos can be found throughout the entire country, but not necessarily native.

With respect to your pics, not familiar with either, and not enough detail on either of the pics to key them. This is particularly true for pic 2, even if it does look somewhat familiar. So I don't know on pic two, nor do I have the time to research it.

Pic one does have enough detail where I can key it to a point and make a reasonable guess.

Pic 1: Amelanchier arborea or Amelanchier canadensis

Pic 2: Don't know ... need more detail to key properly.

PerfectEarth
07-22-2010, 09:10 PM
Really dude? So you can positively ID any plant?

Absolutely not. And that is NOT the point!! Can we agree there are some "bread and butter" plants out there? Some plants that, after working in the industry for a few years, you should be able to ID with no problem?

We're talking about a WILLOW tree here.

Of course if you post some pics of a rare, exotic shrub or perennial, people are going to scratch their head. Me included. And I might post a pic here, or more appropriately, consult the WWW or some reference material. Like I said, some things are very, very entry level.

Florida Gardener
07-22-2010, 09:27 PM
Yea, there are staple plants most know, but we are all here to help each other. If you have to tell the guy it's a willow, what's the big deal? We all started out with little knowledge and have had help from others.

Cloud9Landscapes
07-23-2010, 01:20 AM
keep in mind this is LAWNsite not ORNAMENTALPLANTsite. Most of the crowd here are companies that do strictly lawn maintenance or do very minimal "ornamental landscape" work, maybe hedge trimming or weeding is about it.

No one is going to look at you and think how great of a person you are because you told someone how dumb they are for not knowing a plant. In fact, that's very immature and rude. By you saying "stop clogging lawnsite with threads like this, no I'm not helping you" is pretty damn hypocritical when you come to think about it. No one is going to think what a genius you are. Just help the poor guy out. Well that's my frivolous two cents.

Harley-D
07-23-2010, 09:24 AM
Nope. Plants in the genus of both photos can be found throughout the entire country, but not necessarily native.

With respect to your pics, not familiar with either, and not enough detail on either of the pics to key them.(Don't make excuses if your pics have the same amount of detail or info as mine) This is particularly true for pic 2, even if it does look somewhat familiar. So I don't know on pic two, nor do I have the time to research it.

Pic one does have enough detail where I can key it to a point and make a reasonable guess.(How is your pic one different than my pic two? Leaf and flower buds?)

Pic 1: Amelanchier arborea or Amelanchier canadensis Canadian Serviceberry is correct. Good ID.

Pic 2: Don't know ... need more detail to key properly.

Care to share the key of the plants you showed?
My number 2 is clethra alnifolia (i thought the serrated margins was enough info for ya!)

starry night
07-23-2010, 09:48 AM
Care to share the key of the plants you showed?
My number 2 is clethra alnifolia (i thought the serrated margins was enough info for ya!)

The posts by you and Kiril merely point up how regional much plant-life is.
Here in the East, clethra alnifolia (leaves like elm) commonly called summersweet is recognizable to me. Yet, I'm not at all sure what Kiril's examples were.

Kiril
07-23-2010, 09:57 AM
How is your pic one different than my pic two? Leaf and flower buds?

Because you can see the entire flowering cluster, the entire leaf & petiole, how the leaf it is attached to the stem, if the stem is herbaceous or woody, etc.... These are all key things to consider when keying out a plant. Granted my first pic it is not a perfect view, but it is all there to see. IMO my pic 2 is the worst of the two because it is difficult at best to get the necessary info to key it out.

All your pic two shows is part of the flower and part of a couple of leaves ... not nearly enough to key it out unless you are familiar with the plant to begin with.

Here are some more pics of the plants I posted. BTW ... this was intended as an exercise for Mark ... given he needs to man up.

Kiril
07-23-2010, 11:13 AM
The posts by you and Kiril merely point up how regional much plant-life is.
Here in the East, clethra alnifolia (leaves like elm) commonly called summersweet is recognizable to me. Yet, I'm not at all sure what Kiril's examples were.

Plants in the genus of my posted pics can be found throughout the U.S., either as a native or introduced. The only exception is 3 states for the genus of the second pic.

Now even though the genus of the first pic can be found in every state of the U.S., this particular species is not found at all in the U.S. per USDA plant database. That doesn't necessarily mean it cannot not be found in someones garden, and it shouldn't stop someone from keying the plant to the genus level, at which point you can probably figure it out just by looking at pics.

Point being .... keying a plant and visually knowing a plant because someone told you what it is are two entirely different things. If our good friend Mark actually did take a real plant ID course, then he should be able to use the morphological characteristics of these plants to key them out.

BTW Harley, I looked up Clethra alnifolia and the leaf margin is not quite the same as your pic. I would consider the leaf of the pic you posted as coarsely serrate, which does not appear to be the same as this Clethra alnifolia, which looks more finely serrate. Perhaps different species .... hybrid?

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CLAL3

http://plants.usda.gov/gallery/large/clal3_008_lvp.jpg

Kiril
07-23-2010, 11:31 AM
Absolutely not. And that is NOT the point!! Can we agree there are some "bread and butter" plants out there? Some plants that, after working in the industry for a few years, you should be able to ID with no problem?

We're talking about a WILLOW tree here.

Of course if you post some pics of a rare, exotic shrub or perennial, people are going to scratch their head. Me included. And I might post a pic here, or more appropriately, consult the WWW or some reference material. Like I said, some things are very, very entry level.

What is this plant (middle of pic)? Found native in most all northern U.S. states, including KY.

mattfromNY
07-23-2010, 12:06 PM
just got to jump in here real quick... I dont know the exact defining characteristics of how a ford truck bumper is attached, or what specific colors go on a Ford truck, but I sure as hell can tell its a ford from a loooonnnngggg ways away, just by glancing at it. Same holds true for the OP's pictures, didn't have to look very long to know what they are. Some plants are just way too common to not know them. I agree a plant ID book is a great idea, one of those tools of the trade. (go ahead, bash me now)

Kiril
07-23-2010, 12:28 PM
just got to jump in here real quick... I dont know the exact defining characteristics of how a ford truck bumper is attached, or what specific colors go on a Ford truck, but I sure as hell can tell its a ford from a loooonnnngggg ways away, just by glancing at it. Same holds true for the OP's pictures, didn't have to look very long to know what they are. Some plants are just way too common to not know them. I agree a plant ID book is a great idea, one of those tools of the trade. (go ahead, bash me now)

What is this plant?

Harley-D
07-23-2010, 12:30 PM
pics can be misleading at time i guess.
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.heronswood.com/resources/Heronswood/images/products/processed/00820.zoom.a.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.heronswood.com/product/clethra-alnifolia-pink-spires/&usg=__VgFbAwlWb-rMvhtYQuwanjS7pAI=&h=359&w=513&sz=39&hl=en&start=42&itbs=1&tbnid=C8NYmBwzbBEieM:&tbnh=92&tbnw=131&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dclethra%2Balnifolia%26start%3D40%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26gbv%3D2%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch: 1

Here's the link with the pic.

starry night
07-23-2010, 12:52 PM
Kiril, Is that plant growing in your back yard?

Kiril
07-23-2010, 12:55 PM
Kiril, Is that plant growing in your back yard?

Which one? The tree or the shrub? Ahhh, makes no diff, neither are in my yard. I'm limiting the posted pics to what I can find online from credible sources.

Or do you mean the first two pics I posted?

Kiril
07-23-2010, 01:15 PM
Certainly someone here can visually ID the last two plants I posted without a key. They are "common" plants.

Harley-D
07-23-2010, 01:44 PM
The first pic is horrible. Out of focus and the only identifiable characteristic is the pinnate branch/leaf structure. No bark, no flowers, no seeds, looks like a weed trash tree, not a speciman imo.

Second looks like the leaf of a sawtooth oak. Since it looks like a shrub, i would guess in the laurel family but the pics are hard to tell.

And as far as the second plant from the beginning, snapdragons? Really? They are considered a reseeding annual in many parts. I wouldn't consider them recongizable as far as a commonly used landscape ornamental.

Pull a couple pics from Dirr's hardy tree and shrubs. Those are great pics of awesome tree and shrub specimans. Best book i ever bought!

Kiril
07-23-2010, 02:10 PM
The first pic is horrible. Out of focus and the only identifiable characteristic is the pinnate branch/leaf structure. No bark, no flowers, no seeds, looks like a weed trash tree, not a speciman imo.

I tired to find two pics of "common" plants that were similar in quality to the OPs pics for a "visual" id .... per what some people on this thread claim is easy.

Second looks like the leaf of a sawtooth oak. Since it looks like a shrub, i would guess in the laurel family but the pics are hard to tell.

Wrong family.

And as far as the second plant from the beginning, snapdragons? Really? They are considered a reseeding annual in many parts. I wouldn't consider them recongizable as far as a commonly used landscape ornamental.

Are you talking about my pics? I didn't post any pics of snapdragons.

gunsnroses
07-23-2010, 02:35 PM
- lupinus albifrons same pic mixed in with salvia apiana

- salvia coccinea (lady in red)

- lupinus densiflorus

- salix alba

- sabucus canadensis

Kiril
07-23-2010, 02:52 PM
- lupinus albifrons same pic mixed in with salvia apiana

- salvia coccinea (lady in red)

- lupinus densiflorus

- salix alba

- sabucus canadensis

Which pics go with these?

gunsnroses
07-23-2010, 03:12 PM
All yours in order from page 3. spelling correction; Sambucus not sabucus. Disclaimer: Not sayin they are all correct.



- salvia coccinea (lady in red)

- lupinus albifrons same pic mixed in with salvia apiana

- lupinus densiflorus

- salix alba

- sambucus canadensis

clean_cut
07-23-2010, 03:20 PM
I agree.. see if he went out and killed the plant and came on here asking why it died than maybe you can give him some s**t but he asked first and he's obviously asking cuz he wants to learn. Nothing wrong with learing on this forum this is where i've learned almost everything.


This beginning of this thread made me laugh as I remembered the following story.

John 8:2-11 (New International Version)

2At dawn he appeared again in the temple courts, where all the people gathered around him, and he sat down to teach them. 3The teachers of the law and the Pharisees brought in a woman caught in adultery. They made her stand before the group 4and said to Jesus, "Teacher, this woman was caught in the act of adultery. 5In the Law Moses commanded us to stone such women. Now what do you say?" 6They were using this question as a trap, in order to have a basis for accusing him.

But Jesus bent down and started to write on the ground with his finger. 7When they kept on questioning him, he straightened up and said to them, "If any one of you is without sin, let him be the first to throw a stone at her." 8Again he stooped down and wrote on the ground.

9At this, those who heard began to go away one at a time, the older ones first, until only Jesus was left, with the woman still standing there. 10Jesus straightened up and asked her, "Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?"

11"No one, sir," she said.
"Then neither do I condemn you," Jesus declared. "Go now and leave your life of sin."

I'm sure some of you know this story, right? Seems like pretty good advice eh?

Now I have another question, out of all of you who knew this story and still condemned the guy asking a question, why?

Kiril
07-23-2010, 08:30 PM
All yours in order from page 3. spelling correction; Sambucus not sabucus. Disclaimer: Not sayin they are all correct.



- salvia coccinea (lady in red)

- lupinus albifrons same pic mixed in with salvia apiana

- lupinus densiflorus

- salix alba

- sambucus canadensis

None of them are correct. The first 4 pics I posted are of the same two plants in the same order.

However, I do commend you on getting the genus right on 3 of the 4 plants I posted.

gunsnroses
07-23-2010, 09:56 PM
awww rats!!................

Hell, pretty tough. You posted 2 different colors of lupine, how they the same?

Kiril
07-24-2010, 08:21 AM
awww rats!!................

Hell, pretty tough. You posted 2 different colors of lupine, how they the same?

Nah, you did pretty good all in all. Lot better than Mark the self proclaimed plant ID specialist.

With respect to the color .... don't know why. Perhaps different ssp.?



Salvia elegans Vahl (pineapple sage)

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SAEL6

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194801&stc=1&d=1279805639

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ananassalbei.JPG

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194906&stc=1&d=1279893255


Lupinus arbustus Douglas ex Lindl. (longspur lupine)

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LUAR6&photoID=luar6_002_ahp.tif

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194804&stc=1&d=1279805901

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194907&stc=1&d=1279893271

salix sp.

Note - species is not noted (I suspect it is Salix lucida or ssp. of), however I was looking for a good pic of a pussy willow or any other willow that doesn't look like a weeping willow to demonstrate how the hot shots who think it is easy to spot a willow, aren't really as hot as they think they are.

http://www.malag.aes.oregonstate.edu/wildflowers/images.php/id-1229

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194913&stc=1&d=1279898999


Forsythia viridissima 'Bronxensis' (Bronx Greenstem Forsythia)

Note - another one for the hot shots who think spotting a forsythia is easy. Speaking of forsythia ... why doesn't one of the critics go ahead and provide the genus and species of the plant the OP posted.

http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/f/forvir/forvir1.html

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194914&stc=1&d=1279902379

Mark Oomkes
07-24-2010, 09:19 AM
Nah, you did pretty good all in all. Lot better than Mark the self proclaimed plant ID specialist.

With respect to the color .... don't know why. Perhaps different ssp.?



Salvia elegans Vahl (pineapple sage)

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SAEL6

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194801&stc=1&d=1279805639

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ananassalbei.JPG

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194906&stc=1&d=1279893255


Lupinus arbustus Douglas ex Lindl. (longspur lupine)

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=LUAR6&photoID=luar6_002_ahp.tif

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194804&stc=1&d=1279805901

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194907&stc=1&d=1279893271

salix sp.

Note - species is not noted (I suspect it is Salix lucida or ssp. of), however I was looking for a good pic of a @#!*% willow or any other willow that doesn't look like a weeping willow to demonstrate how the hot shots who think it is easy to spot a willow, aren't really as hot as they think they are.

http://www.malag.aes.oregonstate.edu/wildflowers/images.php/id-1229

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194913&stc=1&d=1279898999


Forsythia viridissima 'Bronxensis' (Bronx Greenstem Forsythia)

Note - another one for the hot shots who think spotting a forsythia is easy. Speaking of forsythia ... why doesn't one of the critics go ahead and provide the genus and species of the plant the OP posted.

http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/f/forvir/forvir1.html

http://www.lawnsite.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=194914&stc=1&d=1279902379

Comptonia peregrina aka sweetfern

Kiril
07-24-2010, 09:36 AM
Comptonia peregrina aka sweetfern

Oh look .... Mark is back. :rolleyes: Is there a reason for this post?

Harley-D
07-26-2010, 11:47 AM
Ahhh. I should have guessed there was a lesson here. The first pic, i'll be honest and say that i almost guessed mexican sage(wrong but a lot closer than my originial guess). The salvia threw me as well as the lupine. The willow and forsythia literally made me laugh. Great post i will admit Kiril and point made. Only arguement is the availability of these great plants for an ornamental install. I've never seen that variety of forsythia available by any grower or re-wholesaler in VA. Great plants but not commonly used.

starry night
07-26-2010, 12:00 PM
I'm surprised that bronxensis forsythia is not available in VA.
There are probably a dozen wholesale nurseries in Ohio that grow it.
It is a ground-cover which I have used although not recently.
It is being supplanted by some better hybrids which are more heavily flowering.

Mark Oomkes
07-26-2010, 12:04 PM
Ahhh. I should have guessed there was a lesson here. The first pic, i'll be honest and say that i almost guessed mexican sage(wrong but a lot closer than my originial guess). The salvia threw me as well as the lupine. The willow and forsythia literally made me laugh. Great post i will admit Kiril and point made. Only arguement is the availability of these great plants for an ornamental install. I've never seen that variety of forsythia available by any grower or re-wholesaler in VA. Great plants but not commonly used.

Agreed, and I believe I apologized several times, but apparently that isn't enough for some.

I bow down to Kiril. Because I'm sure he's never made a mistake or said something he wished he hadn't.

Kiril
07-26-2010, 12:31 PM
Ahhh. I should have guessed there was a lesson here. The first pic, i'll be honest and say that i almost guessed mexican sage(wrong but a lot closer than my originial guess). The salvia threw me as well as the lupine. The willow and forsythia literally made me laugh. Great post i will admit Kiril and point made. Only arguement is the availability of these great plants for an ornamental install. I've never seen that variety of forsythia available by any grower or re-wholesaler in VA. Great plants but not commonly used.

To find these plants you need to find a nursery the specializes in native plants (other than the forsythia) or find a seed distributor. I get most of my natives in seed form. Native plants/seeds aren't cheap, but the are numerous benefits to using them in landscapes, least of which is native habitat restoration.

Here's a pic of natives I seeded (various species) earlier this spring. Anyone what to guess what they are (not the bind weed either)?

Kiril
07-26-2010, 12:36 PM
I bow down to Kiril. Because I'm sure he's never made a mistake or said something he wished he hadn't.

No one is infallible Mark, however you tore the OP a new ass for no good reason .... therefore laying out the invitation to do the same to you. We all had to start somewhere, and what may be a easily identifiable plant to one person, may not be for the next.

Kiril
07-26-2010, 01:16 PM
Here is a cool pic. Not bad for a hand held shot with a cheap ass kit lens.

gunsnroses
07-26-2010, 03:06 PM
nepeta of sorts