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emby
08-04-2010, 07:42 PM
Just wondering what all of you guys in the colder climates are doing with ground mounted fixtures (Uplights not pathlights)? Are you still installing halogen bulbs into these or have you been using LED's? If so has the snow been melting off of the fixtures during the winter months or is the design rendered useless during these times?
Thanks for your input gentlemen.

Ken

RLI Electric
08-04-2010, 08:04 PM
We should get an answer anytime, James?:) The LED fixtures that I have used down here in CT were never effected negatively. Go for it. A 2 foot snow pack is a different issue though I am sure.

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
08-04-2010, 11:57 PM
For the most part, snowfall does not significantly affect the output or performance of uplight fixtures that are lamped with LED lamps. In most cases the snow melts from the fixtures as it falls and accumulates. Certainly in Ken's area (South Western Ontario) it should not be an issue except during heavy snowfalls that occur once or twice a season.

LED lamps do create heat. The heat that is created by my LED lamps is enough to keep the fixtures clear of snow. Obviously it will not melt the snow as quickly as a halogen lamp will, but it still does melt the snow. I have many LED lamps installed in in-grade well lights, and even these are relatively snow free all winter long.

During heavy snowstorms, the fixtures may become buried, but they will melt that which falls on them. In areas of significant snow accumulation, you will find it necessary to clear the snow from the fixtures (Here we get a LOT of snow, and I have to clear the fixtures at my home after the big snow 'events') But this is the case with halogen lamps too.

Use good quality fixtures that keep the moisture out and you should be good to go.

Tomwilllight
08-05-2010, 02:00 PM
I dislike what happens when an uplight gets buried in snow; even when the heat "burns through" the snow, an annoying icy bright "halo" remains.

When working in snow country, I make every effort to mount uplights above the snow line. For example: if I'm working in a stand of trees (or even 2 trees close together) I consider mounting uplight(s) above the snow line and on the "backside" of neighboring trees.

Depending on the tree and what it gives the designer to work with, it may be possible to mount an uplight on the trunk of the lighted tree. I call that a "self-lighted" tree. Judicious use of downlight can help soften the light's transition at the base of the tree and reconnect the tree to the earth.

I am usually not a fan of mounting uplight on stems (tree-attached or ground-mounted) because I've found few mounting systems sufficiently stable to maintain accurate focus. Of course, you may have no choice.

Another solution is to simply connect the uplights to a separate switch and turn them off for the snow season. The resulting down light only scene can be quite beautiful on a fresh field of snow.

Tom

INTEGRA Bespoke Lighting
08-05-2010, 09:24 PM
Hey Tom... You would have some fun times mounting uplights 'above the snow line' in my neck of the woods! :) Those would be some seriously tall stems! Just around my home, we typically have well over 2 feet of snow on the ground at any given time during the winter and often times it is around 3 feet. Last December we received just under 5 feet of snow in one 20 hour snowfall, but admittedly that was a very rare event.

The Lighting Geek
08-06-2010, 04:30 PM
I dislike what happens when an uplight gets buried in snow; even when the heat "burns through" the snow, an annoying icy bright "halo" remains.

When working in snow country, I make every effort to mount uplights above the snow line. For example: if I'm working in a stand of trees (or even 2 trees close together) I consider mounting uplight(s) above the snow line and on the "backside" of neighboring trees.

Depending on the tree and what it gives the designer to work with, it may be possible to mount an uplight on the trunk of the lighted tree. I call that a "self-lighted" tree. Judicious use of downlight can help soften the light's transition at the base of the tree and reconnect the tree to the earth.

I am usually not a fan of mounting uplight on stems (tree-attached or ground-mounted) because I've found few mounting systems sufficiently stable to maintain accurate focus. Of course, you may have no choice.

Another solution is to simply connect the uplights to a separate switch and turn them off for the snow season. The resulting down light only scene can be quite beautiful on a fresh field of snow.

Tom

I did a job in South Lake Tahoe and mounted my up lights in the trees above the snow line (14') and my down lights 25+'. It looks awesome downlighting the snow and the up lights worked beautifully. This job was halogen but I would have done it the same way with LED. Most of the winter there is about 4-5' base and an occasional pile up to 10-15'.
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Tomwilllight
08-09-2010, 01:09 PM
I did a job in South Lake Tahoe and mounted my up lights in the trees above the snow line (14') and my down lights 25+'. It looks awesome downlighting the snow and the up lights worked beautifully. This job was halogen but I would have done it the same way with LED. Most of the winter there is about 4-5' base and an occasional pile up to 10-15'.
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Sounds beautiful Tommy!!!

Tom

emby
08-11-2010, 12:35 AM
Thanks for the discussion and sharing your experiences gentlemen. I certainly will be incorporating some of your suggested installation techniques into my designs to ensure that the intended scene will be veiwable during the winter months.
Many thanks.

Ken