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minix
08-10-2010, 10:28 AM
I have a few trees that are over 1/2 dead - eaten by something. Could anyone help me to find out what going on and how to handle it befor these trees die? Thanks so much.

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r222/76imp/tree3.jpg

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r222/76imp/tree.jpg

http://i145.photobucket.com/albums/r222/76imp/tree2.jpg

Kiril
08-10-2010, 10:42 AM
What is eating the tree .... an insect.

minix
08-10-2010, 11:02 AM
What is eating the tree .... an insect.

I kinda knew that much but I would like to find out what and how to handle it .

ICT Bill
08-10-2010, 11:03 AM
It looks like you will have to use your Spidey senses, whip out the cape and investigate a little further

The pictures are not good enough to tell really, can you get one from a little further back so that we can see if there is a pattern

are they still actively feeding? can you get a shot of the pest causing it? It looks like an Oak but difficult to tell
Or those bag worms, again can't tell fron the picture, its something hanging from the tree

Florida Gardener
08-10-2010, 11:03 AM
Kiril

Are you sure it isn't Sasquatch?

minix
08-10-2010, 11:38 AM
It looks like you will have to use your Spidey senses, whip out the cape and investigate a little further

The pictures are not good enough to tell really, can you get one from a little further back so that we can see if there is a pattern

are they still actively feeding? can you get a shot of the pest causing it? It looks like an Oak but difficult to tell
Or those bag worms, again can't tell fron the picture, its something hanging from the tree

Ok Ill try to get better pic but there are no pest to be found just what looks to be old cocoons with a dryed up lillte worm in it . It seems to be eating 1 side of the tree only.

Cutter1
08-10-2010, 11:52 AM
bag worm, by the time you see the damage its too late. Remove all pods before the eggs hatch next season. Make sure you dispose of them (not on the ground) You can also spray with a insecticide.

minix
08-10-2010, 11:58 AM
bag worm, by the time you see the damage its too late. Remove all pods before the eggs hatch next season. Make sure you dispose of them (not on the ground) You can also spray with a insecticide.

Thank you for your reply

starry night
08-10-2010, 12:05 PM
The one pic does show a bagworm although it looks to me like a carcass from last year (it is already tied on the twig and is dried out.) The leaves seem to have too much eaten to be from bagworms (deciduous trees not being their food of choice). Also bagworm larvae eat leaves starting at the edges. Some of these leaves have holes in the middle. So maybe we can rule out the bagworms for most of this damage.

When you say the trees are dying, do you see signs other than the leaves being eaten? Can you list the trees for us? I know the site from your pic but I can't remember what trees are there. Also, can you tell us when this damage occurred and over what length of time?

Kiril
08-10-2010, 01:03 PM
Kiril

Are you sure it isn't Sasquatch?

Could be .... or maybe aliens .... hard to tell. :laugh:

Think Green
08-10-2010, 08:19 PM
Minix,
If possible..........return to this site or customer's home during the early evening or in the early morning and look at the insect that is feeding on these leaves. Cooler times or when the outside heated temperatures are low is the best time to investigate for the vector.
Could be Leaf Skeletonizers, Tent Caterpillars,etc. Beetles and Inchworms do the most damage to ornamental trees in the urban setting. The beetles will feed at night while the caterpillar will feed early when the temps are lower.

minix
08-10-2010, 09:18 PM
Could be .... or maybe aliens .... hard to tell. :laugh:

Why these kinda responds? If you dont have anything to help why post dumb ****?

Kiril
08-10-2010, 09:31 PM
Why these kinda responds? If you dont have anything to help why post dumb ****?

Because it was supposed to help you realize that an answer is not possible with a couple of pics of chewed leaves. Find the culprit in action, snap a pic, then we can talk.

starry night
08-10-2010, 09:49 PM
Minix, please give us some more information. What trees? Did this just happen now? Or before? All of a sudden? Over how long a period? And once again, other than the leaves being chewed, are there other signs that the trees are being "killed" ? Trying to help but you aren't helping us help you.

minix
08-11-2010, 11:00 AM
Thanks for the help the problem is being taken care of today.

starry night
08-11-2010, 11:05 AM
You gonna let us know the result?

minix
08-11-2010, 11:14 AM
You gonna let us know the result?

Sure will I fig it would be better to just contact someone local for help. Thanks gagin for all your help.

Indyplower
08-11-2010, 01:02 PM
In the last picture you show a bag worm.

you can check at dusk as someone said.

Or you can pinch the bag worm from the bottom and it will pop out the top, it should look like a caterpillar, either way remove and destroy the sacks, they contain 500-1000 eggs for NEXT YEAR.

Google bag worms for more info......good luck.

Mike

starry night
08-11-2010, 01:06 PM
Mike, You are late to the party. The OP for some reason didn't get anything out of our attempt to answer and has closed off the discussion as you can read above.

Indyplower
08-11-2010, 01:08 PM
yea, but somebody else might take advantage of it........ no big deal.

starry night
08-11-2010, 01:29 PM
yea, but somebody else might take advantage of it........ no big deal.

Despite there being one or two bags hanging on one twig, it was never established that bagworrms were the cause of most of his problem.
For instance, from what I could see these were old carcasses tied on from last year. True, they may have been a source of newly hatched worms but the OP didn't say he saw any. For all the damage, there would have had to be many, highly visible active bagworms at this time in NW Ohio. For that matter, most of the bagworms around here were killed during the winter. In my city, I have only found a few survivors in very shelthered spots. Also, many leaves showed holes in the middle. In my experience, bagworm larvae only eat from the outside in.

The unfortunate part of this thread is that the OP was PO and won't share with us what he found from his "local source." (If he found out anything.)
And, as you say, that might have been helpful to others reading the thread.

Florida Gardener
08-11-2010, 08:57 PM
I still think it was Sasquatch......

starry night
08-11-2010, 09:11 PM
I still think it was Sasquatch......

I guess we will never know.

minix
08-12-2010, 01:06 PM
Mike, You are late to the party. The OP for some reason didn't get anything out of our attempt to answer and has closed off the discussion as you can read above.

I got alot out of what was posted so why say that I didnt? I also believe I thanked all that posted and helped, not sure what else I should do.

starry night
08-12-2010, 06:01 PM
I got alot out of what was posted so why say that I didnt? I also believe I thanked all that posted and helped, not sure what else I should do.

You should report what you found out with your local source.
That would help us by knowing where we were right and where we were wrong.
Hope it worked out well for you and the trees.

integrityman
08-12-2010, 06:26 PM
Minix, I would get a really good fertilizer on it soon. specifically get a spike type fertilizer you can attach to a hose and inject right into the ground.

Smallaxe
08-13-2010, 10:01 AM
Too late for N in trees and shrubs. K, may be appropriate, this time of year, or other necessary micros. They are going dormant now and losing leaves, not putting on new ones. :)

starry night
08-13-2010, 10:16 AM
Too late for N in trees and shrubs. K, may be appropriate, this time of year, or other necessary micros. They are going dormant now and losing leaves, not putting on new ones. :)

I agree. I don't know why you would put fert on insect-damaged trees (especially this time of year.)

minix
08-13-2010, 10:18 AM
You should report what you found out with your local source.
That would help us by knowing where we were right and where we were wrong.
Hope it worked out well for you and the trees.

I work alot of hrs and dont really have time to get on pc so sry I didnt post findings as soon as I got them. Had another guy come in and look and he sprayed all trees for bagworms as it had many pods on it and some other trees. We also had a termite problem at another store. It just seems like something is wrong with alot of the trees and shrubs and ground cover at all these locations.

Kiril
08-13-2010, 10:54 AM
Stressed, weak plants are more vulnerable to attack/disease.

minix
08-13-2010, 11:46 AM
Stressed, weak plants are more vulnerable to attack/disease.

What stress out ground cover? It may be a dumb question but I have to ask. Some of the ground cover dosent even get prunned and its still looking bad and its been there for years.

Kiril
08-13-2010, 11:51 AM
What stress out ground cover? It may be a dumb question but I have to ask. Some of the ground cover dosent even get prunned and its still looking bad and its been there for years.

There are general factors that all plants are susceptible to (water, competition, nutrients, soil structure, etc...), then there are genus/species specific issues. What type of ground cover and do you have pics of it?

Johnny test
08-13-2010, 07:01 PM
Stressed, weak plants are more vulnerable to attack/disease.

That's the smartest post in this thread....

Think Green
08-13-2010, 09:30 PM
Are we going to stagger into the reasons of insect attack is attributed to stress hormones sent out by trees, plants, and grasses during periods of stress.???? Is it natural selection that one tree is singled out over a grove of thousands or maybe one particular tree in a city block?? The darn insect is hungry and your tree was in their path to the food bar. Japanese beetles are and were bad this season. They completely devoured my neighbors fruit trees, ornamental pears, maples, and apples.

Kinz
08-29-2010, 10:17 PM
It looks like a Norway Maple tree. Spray the tree with Malathion after you pick off as many of the bags as you can reach and burn them. But spraing them will do the same thing. It will kill the insect inside.

starry night
08-29-2010, 10:27 PM
It looks like a Norway Maple tree. Spray the tree with Malathion after you pick off as many of the bags as you can reach and burn them. But spraing them will do the same thing. It will kill the insect inside.

Be careful giving advice out of your geographic area. Here in Northern Ohio, the bagworms have finished eating, have thick bags, and have tied themselves on for the winter. Anything sprayed on the tree will be wasted. And I know of no chemical which will penetrate the bags now.

(Note: it has never been confirmed on this thread that the damage was in fact from bagworms.)

Kinz
08-30-2010, 07:31 AM
It's also strange that this bagworm is in that tree. Bagworms are usually in evergreens like Leyland Cypress and other plants like that. Sometimes a few might come over to another plant, but not in great numbers. And yes, I guess I should have clarified that the bags need to have the caterpillar inside in order for it to be killed. Spraying an empty bag doesn't dooo much good. Bacillus thuringiensis is a good natural insecticide and Orthene is a good chemical control.

starry night
08-30-2010, 07:57 AM
It's also strange that this bagworm is in that tree. Bagworms are usually in evergreens like Leyland Cypress and other plants like that. Sometimes a few might come over to another plant, but not in great numbers. And yes, I guess I should have clarified that the bags need to have the caterpillar inside in order for it to be killed. Spraying an empty bag doesn't dooo much good. Bacillus thuringiensis is a good natural insecticide and Orthene is a good chemical control.

Yes, Kinz, you are right, I suggested that bagworms are not usually found in damaging numbers in the deciduous trees we have here. The preferred homes here are arborvitae, junipers, and some spruces. And not to belabor the point, but those leaves showed damage (e.g. holes in middle) that didn't look like they came from bagworms. I would differ with you on the one point. I have not seen an insecticide that will penetrate aged bags of the current year.

Kinz
08-30-2010, 08:02 AM
yeah, you're probably right. I guess catch'em early is the best thing.

bdoeden
08-30-2010, 11:35 AM
As others have said those are bagworms. I've only seen them on evergreens in our area.

Coffeecraver
09-03-2010, 09:24 PM
Looks like Japanese Beetle damage.

:)

fedcopcutting
09-07-2010, 10:39 PM
You have a bad case of bag worms....email me and I'll tell you what to use to treat it

starry night
09-07-2010, 11:04 PM
You must not have read the whole thread. This issue was settled a couple weeks ago.