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DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-12-2010, 11:01 AM
Looking to slice overseed a lawn with known Necrotic Ring Spot issue. Want to introduce more fescues/per rye and improved KBG varieties. Do these choices sound appealing to you?

1) 85% Creeping Red fescue, 15% KBG "Moonshine" mix from Reinders.

2) 33% Creeping Red fescue, 33% Per Rye, 33% KBG "Shamrock" mix from JDL (park and rec mix)

I know the critical constraint here is the KBG - I don't want to exacerbate the NRS problem by introducing weak cultivars of KBG.

What do you think? If neither of these, ideas??

ICT Bill
08-12-2010, 02:04 PM
I think I would lean on a local university that does turf grass and see what they think or a local extension agent that sees issues in the field everyday

every area is so different I like to lean on local knowledge with seed varieties, you are smart to introduce new varieties some varieties from just 5 years ago have been surpassed with others

RigglePLC
08-12-2010, 03:14 PM
I don't care for red fescue. Problem number two is that Kentucky bluegrass has a small seed and rather weak seedling--you may not get more than 10 percent "take" in an overseed situation. Ryegrass takes better, but it may not match your present grass. The only guaranteed method is to kill and strip sod--replace with top quality disease resistant sod. The chance of callbacks is greatly reduced.

Or you can just replace the diseased spots with sod patch cut to match. Need sod lifter or sod cutting machine. Plus a big machette. Quick--easy.

Smallaxe
08-12-2010, 06:38 PM
Sow what grows well and try to not let the NRS bother, in the future.

americanlawn
08-12-2010, 07:22 PM
I don't care for ryegrasses in general. Many of them "grow in clumps", and others get "rust". Regarding fine fescues (creeping, red, sheep, etc), some are okay, but many have issues during summer heat in sunny areas.

Been seeing more & more lawns with "turf-type" tall fescue blended with KBG. I like it. My 2 cents worth

OrganicsMaine
08-12-2010, 07:57 PM
I don't care for ryegrasses in general. Many of them "grow in clumps", and others get "rust". Regarding fine fescues (creeping, red, sheep, etc), some are okay, but many have issues during summer heat in sunny areas.

Been seeing more & more lawns with "turf-type" tall fescue blended with KBG. I like it. My 2 cents worth

For us here in Maine, the Per. Rye may only last 1 or two winters, so I treat that more as a quick cover. I have not seen a turf-type tall fescue blended with KBG, however, I am very curious about it. How well does it blend, and how does it look with a dark KBG like midnight? I am looking into creating my own blends, I have a local vendor that will blend what ever seed I want, and I have been trying to research the TTTF, of course most of the pictures that I can find aren't that great. FYI, most of my lawns are higher end with very picky clients so it will have to look good.

Smallaxe
08-13-2010, 11:07 AM
For color and texture, I think your only option, is KBG. I personally, like the fine fescues, but the color is automatically lacking by comparison.

DA Quality Lawn & YS
08-13-2010, 03:21 PM
For color and texture, I think your only option, is KBG. I personally, like the fine fescues, but the color is automatically lacking by comparison.

OK - what KBG cultivars have good resistance to NRS then? The last thing I want to do is sow KBG seed that is vulnerable to a known fungal issue, exacerbating the problem...

Smallaxe
08-13-2010, 06:18 PM
I haven't bothered doing that kind of research. We haven't had fungal problems and I either get the popular KBG or the mixture of the 3.
I prefer the mixture and my 'high end clients" are cool with it. Research the midnight KBG and see how it stands up to NRS.
What cultural practices promote/reduce NRS?

JoJo1990
08-13-2010, 11:43 PM
OK - what KBG cultivars have good resistance to NRS then? The last thing I want to do is sow KBG seed that is vulnerable to a known fungal issue, exacerbating the problem...

http://www.ntep.org/

All the info you need right here. You can look up varieties resistant fungal and insect attack, among other things.

Smallaxe
08-14-2010, 09:58 AM
http://www.ntep.org/

All the info you need right here. You can look up varieties resistant fungal and insect attack, among other things.

No NRS at all listed for KBG. :)

RigglePLC
08-14-2010, 02:22 PM
Try top-quality seed blends sold for sod farm use, (or stadium use). Northstar, Midnight II, Moonlight, Unique, and America, for example. Pay particular attention to the claims by the seed producer--if it does not say it is resistant to NRS--it probably is not.

Remember the weak seedling problem with Kentucky bluegrass still is a big problem. It comes up very slowly, perhaps an inch high after one month. Sod growers (under ideal conditions) plan on 18 months to grow fully thick sod. Expect the same at your site. Remember also that many of the best varieties green up slowly in the spring.

Slow fill-in and the resulting weeds can cause a huge customer dissatisfaction problem. Be ready to apoligize. And sometimes receive no payment.