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GreenT
08-23-2010, 02:25 PM
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http://www.buysod.com/images/sod_raleighstaugustine.jpg



Has anyone had any experience with Captiva?

We are doing a test with a client and recently installed about 3K sq feet of it on their property.

So far, this is what we've found....

Heat tolerance - Consistent heat indexes over 100F doesn't seem to affect it.

Shade tolerance - Seems to grow faster/taller in the shade. No noticeable thinning yet.

Drought tolerance - Undetermined yet. The sod was installed 7 weeks ago and rains have been steady since. In fact, most days we've had some pretty huge downpours. October is the beginning of the dry season here so we'll see then how it does.

Rate of growth - In full sun, it is a much slower compared to Floratan needing to be cut every 15 days. Under current conditions, irrigated, fertilized Floratan properties could use every 5 days mowing.

Height of cut - All the literature I've read on it recommends a low cut between 2-3 inches. So far, we've found it looks best at 4-4.25 inches.


I have to say I'm most impressed with this turf so far. It has a much deeper green than Floratan. It is lush (thick) and much, much smoother also -- a pleasure to walk on it barefoot. :)

Any input from you guys?

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GreenT
08-24-2010, 06:30 PM
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Anybody??? ;)

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dKoester
08-24-2010, 07:35 PM
Its bred for the heat.
It grows fast or longer due to the cells stretching to get the most light.
Mowing height you stated is best. Plus this keeps the soil covers so few weeds sprout.
As for being a darker green, that is genetic. But you can even make it darker with some magnesium.
Pest and fungi resistance to be determined.


Great grass!

GreenT
08-25-2010, 12:16 AM
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Thanks dK. With all the rain we've been getting I've noticed a small section with Greyleaf fungus.

Nothing major but will keep an eye on it.

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dKoester
08-25-2010, 12:40 AM
We had lots of rain here too. Here's something for that fungus.Two tablespoons of baking soda per gallon of water will halt it in its tracks and any other fungus that tries to bother the lawn. Just use a backpack sprayer, makes it real easy. You don't have to soak the ground, just make it damp and the grass blades wet. Then let it dry.

Buck_wheat
08-25-2010, 07:36 AM
I have not seen or even heard of the new strain of Captiva St Augustine turf. I'm keenly interested in knowing how it will tolerate the cooler weather. Since I'm in Zone 9 I don't think freezing is a hazard but temps in the mid to low 40's overnight are possible for extended periods.

I don't install Floratam because it is extremely sensitive to herbicide treatment and just fussy all around. I've had some good sucess with Seville in shady spots but overall I just install the generic.

Please keep me posted on the performance of the Captiva and how it responds to pest control and dryer conditions. I'd also be interested in knowing how well it competes in terms of pricing; I pay about $80.00 for a pallet (app. 500sqf) now.

FYI... I agree with you on the height of the cut; 2-3" is low for a centipede grass particularly in the FL sun. I generally cut @ 4-4.25" when hot & dry and 3.5-3.75" when wetter conditions prevail.

Thanks for the info & I look foward to hearing more about price & pest resistence.

AI Inc
08-25-2010, 07:50 AM
We had lots of rain here too. Here's something for that fungus.Two tablespoons of baking soda per gallon of water will halt it in its tracks and any other fungus that tries to bother the lawn. Just use a backpack sprayer, makes it real easy. You don't have to soak the ground, just make it damp and the grass blades wet. Then let it dry.

Does this work on cool weather grasses too?

dKoester
08-25-2010, 06:30 PM
Yes it does. Just remember that whatever damage the fungus caused will have to be repaired especially with brown patch. It does not turn grass green. It only kills the fungus.

AI Inc
08-26-2010, 06:46 AM
Thank you.

GreenT
08-27-2010, 09:12 PM
I have not seen or even heard of the new strain of Captiva St Augustine turf. I'm keenly interested in knowing how it will tolerate the cooler weather. Since I'm in Zone 9 I don't think freezing is a hazard but temps in the mid to low 40's overnight are possible for extended periods.


I'm in Zone 9 as well. Looking forward to see how it does next winter.



Please keep me posted on the performance of the Captiva and how it responds to pest control and dryer conditions. I'd also be interested in knowing how well it competes in terms of pricing; I pay about $80.00 for a pallet (app. 500sqf) now.


Two of the selling features of Captiva is its reduced need for watering and resistance to Cinch bugs. Here's a little video (http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2008/1009-slower_growing_grass.htm) with more info.

I paid $105/pallet btw.

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GreenT
08-27-2010, 09:15 PM
Two tablespoons of baking soda per gallon of water will halt it in its tracks and any other fungus that tries to bother the lawn.


Good tip dK. I've heard of it before, although I've yet to try it.

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Buck_wheat
08-28-2010, 02:44 PM
I'm in Zone 9 as well. Looking forward to see how it does next winter.

Two of the selling features of Captiva is its reduced need for watering and resistance to Cinch bugs. Here's a little video (http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2008/1009-slower_growing_grass.htm) with more info.

I paid $105/pallet btw.

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Thanks for the info... the price premium may be worth it if it reduces the # of cuts, overall maintenance & pestice applications.

I'll need to get a better understanding of the premium recovery period... eg. how long will it take for the savings in maintenance to recover the 20% + premium over what I'm paying now.

I'm excited about this new strain and appreciate you bringing it to us. I'll be watching for a while.

Keith
09-10-2010, 05:21 AM
I've had it in my front yard since July 1st. It started off great, but I have a large hedge that cuts down on air movement a bit. It's been terribly hot and humid here, and it did develop fungus. Though I am not sure it's not cercospora leaf spot rather than gray leaf spot. I do have some thinner areas in the shade from that, and mainly from webworms that I didn't treat for right away. I fertilized it with 8-0-16 around the second week of August.

I cut it for the first time at 4 weeks. And I've cut it a total of 4 times since it was put in. While it can be cut every two weeks, and still not be as tall as Floratam in 5 days, it's probably better cut at about 10 or 11 days.

Once rooted (which was no time at all) it seemed to hold up to heat about as good as any St. Augustine that I have used. In fact, we had enough rain that I did not water it but once in the first 16 days it was in.

I wanted to try it ever since I first heard about it. I finally found some and had to pay pretty big premium for it. I will not install it anywhere else until I see what it does. I made that mistake with Palmetto about eight years ago.

GreenT
09-10-2010, 05:42 PM
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Thanks for the info Keith. Keep us posted.

My test property is bouncing back from the gray leaf now that the rains have subsided. I did noticed some thinning in the shady spots (when first laid down those were the areas it looked the best) so now I'm curious to see how it will do in the future.

You're right, best cutting schedule would probably be every 10-12 days, although that's not my schedule. :dancing: :laugh:

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GreenT
10-23-2010, 08:49 PM
My test property is bouncing back from the gray leaf now that the rains have subsided.


Update:

Since the above post we've had almost no rain. The Captiva has recovered from what turned out to be a heavy fungus infestation. It started with gray leaf and then cercospora leaf spot took over (you were right Keith :)).

Now that it has been completely dry for about a month, it is doing great. This grass really doesn't like too much water/humidity. While Floratan is struggling on minimal watering (as regulated), the Captiva is thriving.

Lesson learned. Will recommend to homeowners to shut down their irrigation system during next's year rainy season. Much water savings.... :weightlifter:

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Keith
10-23-2010, 11:40 PM
Same thing. No rain in about a month. I'm watering mine once a week now, or about .5 to .6" a week. It shows signs of stress only on the 7th day. After a watering, it recovers almost instantly. Just speculating, but I would imagine nitrogen needs will be much lower than other varieties as well.

As with yours, all the fungal problems are pretty much gone. I never treated it with a fungicide. I wanted it to survive on its own. I should mention, many other semi-dwarf varieties also seemed to have more fungal problems than usual this year.

This is a true slow-growing variety. I've probably mowed it six or seven times since I installed it (July 1st.) The total amount of clippings in nearly four months would be roughly equivalent to one week of Floratam clippings in the summer! No joke. If you think zoysia needs very little, you haven't seen anything. I've edged it once, only because it had four or five runners that had grown a inch or so over the driveway. I don't have any idea how they get it to grow at the sod farms, it just doesn't move. I had a couple of weak pieces that mostly died when I first put it in. I don't think the runners will ever fill it in. I can't imagine plugs will ever be available.

GreenT
10-24-2010, 11:43 PM
I don't have any idea how they get it to grow at the sod farms, it just doesn't move.


The same thought cross my mind. I would guess it takes five times as long as Floratan to grow so.... will prices go up in the future if it catches on and more acreage is needed? Time will tell, I guess.

Btw Keith, I talked to my guy last week and forgot to ask him about the info you wanted. I haven't forgotten though. well I did, so I'll ask him next time. :)

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Keith
10-25-2010, 12:22 AM
The people I have talked to don't have Captiva available at all now. Most have said they don't expect it until next summer.

I started to put a couple of pallets of Sapphire in the back yard. It seems to be the exact opposite of Captiva. Supposedly has vicious growth. I was afraid it would wrap around the house and overrun the Captiva :D

Patriot Services
11-10-2010, 04:59 PM
How is it turning out. I am looking for options to give customers besides floratam.
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Keith
11-11-2010, 01:55 AM
Mine looks really good right now. Like most semi-dwarf varieties, it likes the cooler, dry weather better than the heat and humidity. Bottom line, I like it in my yard. But, at this time I wouldn't put it in a customer's yard. I think it has enough quirks to keep it from being widely used. If it didn't have the quirks, those in the lawn cutting business would be in big trouble. I really mean that. The stuff just does not grow.

As far as an option to Floratam, I always hope to find one, but end up going back to it. Despite it's flaws, it's durable. It can recover from heat stress and drought better than any other I have used. It can grow out of most fungus problems. And, even though chinch bugs do a number on it, I've never seen anyone lose more than 15-20% of there lawn in a year, even if it was never treated. I can't say that for any other variety that we have.

When I need a different variety for shade, or whatever reason, I usually go with Seville. It's pretty easy to get. It grows slower than Floratam. And has a finer blade. But it can get spongey.

Landscape Poet
11-15-2010, 11:58 PM
Two of the selling features of Captiva is its reduced need for watering and resistance to Cinch bugs. Here's a little video (http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2008/1009-slower_growing_grass.htm) with more info.

I paid $105/pallet btw.

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I would not put this as a selling point to a customer. The University does not recognize any cultivator of SA as being chinch bug resistant, they state it has improved tolerance (http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep398), but that is not resistance, until then, I would not tell a customer that, because you know who they will blame when damage occurs! If they want chinch bug resistant turf - zoysia is what you should give them.

Second - I think Floratam can get by pretty good during our rainy season without much additional irrigation if it has been properly feed. Still needs it during our dry periods like our last little 30 day period of no rain.

GreenT
11-16-2010, 02:44 AM
I would not put this as a selling point to a customer.


1. I don't sell it to my clients. This was originally the homeowners' idea, I provided the service of finding a supplier, installation, and BMP in maintain it.

2. Your splitting hairs with the semantics involved... resistance v. improved tolerance. It's the same thing. "Immune" would have been an inappropriate characterization.

3. The definition of plant resistance as per Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_disease_resistance):


Plant disease resistance derives both from pre-formed defenses and from infection-induced responses mediated by the plant immune system. Relative to a disease-susceptible plant, disease resistance is often defined as reduction of pathogen growth on or in the plant, while the term disease tolerance describes plants that exhibit less disease damage despite similar levels of pathogen growth.


If you prefer to be more specific and narrow the focus to insect damage, here's their definition (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_defense_against_herbivory#Importance_to_humans):


Plant defense against herbivory or host-plant resistance (HPR) describes a range of adaptations evolved by plants which improve their survival and reproduction by reducing the impact of herbivores.


4. From the IFAS page you cite...


Research conducted prior to release of 'Captiva' indicates that there is a higher mortality rate for southern chinch bugs with 'Captiva' (91.3%) compared to Floratam (47.2%). Similarly, plant hoppers survived for an average of 3.2 days on 'Captiva', compared to 18.2 days survival on 'Classic' St. Augustinegrass, which had the highest susceptibility of the cultivars tested.


Both the definition and the research concur: a reduction of pathogen growth... higher mortality rate for southern chinch bugs.

Btw, the University is not always right, they recommend cutting at 2-2.5 inches which is ridiculous.

I thank you for the advice nonetheless.

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GreenT
11-16-2010, 02:54 AM
How is it turning out. I am looking for options to give customers besides floratam.


I haven't responded to you sooner because I was out of town last week. I plan to visit the property sometime this week and will update you on the status.

Re options, I'd suggest you follow Keith's advice. It is way early in the life/usability cycle of this new variety to make an informed decision. I would like to see its performance for at least 2-3 seasons before making any determinations.

One of the reasons I started this thread was to find out if anybody else had more experience with this variety, however, that doesn't seem to be the case.

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Keith
11-16-2010, 05:18 AM
Btw, the University is not always right, they recommend cutting at 2-2.5 inches which is ridiculous.



Yeah, that would pretty much be a disaster.

Patriot Services
11-16-2010, 11:08 AM
I haven't responded to you sooner because I was out of town last week. I plan to visit the property sometime this week and will update you on the status.

Re options, I'd suggest you follow Keith's advice. It is way early in the life/usability cycle of this new variety to make an informed decision. I would like to see its performance for at least 2-3 seasons before making any determinations.

One of the reasons I started this thread was to find out if anybody else had more experience with this variety, however, that doesn't seem to be the case.

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I agree. Floratam hasn't exactly lived up to it's early claims. I've seen a lot of decline this season. Thinking it is the long term fallout from last winter.
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Keith
11-16-2010, 12:36 PM
Floratam didn't have chinch bug problems for about 12-13 years. Bugs will always adapt. If Captiva becomes widely used, it's just a matter of time before it loses it's resistance. Maybe five years, maybe twenty. Of course, I guess it's always possible that they could adapt to zoysia as well.

On the subject of Captiva though, guess what's back? Mine has a good deal of dollar spot this morning.

Patriot Services
11-16-2010, 01:02 PM
More baking soda?
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Keith
11-16-2010, 01:11 PM
Nah, I'll let it correct itself...or not. I wouldn't expect a customer to show it any special attention. I want to see what this grass does with minimum input. Hopefully I am not looking at like I did the Palmetto eight years ago.

GreenT
11-16-2010, 03:41 PM
I want to see what this grass does with minimum input.


Same here. Water, nutrients, chemicals...

How prominent is the dollar spot Keith?

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GreenT
11-16-2010, 04:01 PM
I agree. Floratam hasn't exactly lived up to it's early claims. I've seen a lot of decline this season. Thinking it is the long term fallout from last winter.


Let me tell you a little story... we live on five acres in Central Fl. We bought the property in the mid 80's from an older lady whose husband had recently passed away. The house is a 70's ranch and in those days it was common for home owners to lay St. Augustine only on the front yard and the rest leave it to the Bahia.

From what I could tell then, they never fertilized nor irrigated anything. For environmental reasons we also decided not to do any of it either even though we have a well.

The result?... In season, our SA looks better than any I have seen, off season it goes dormant but never really dies off, and once the rains start again it takes off. For over 20 years at least, this grass has never been fed nor has it ever needed any pesticide.

Let me make it clear, it has never had cinch bug or any other problem other than some assorted weed here and there.

I'm of the opinion that over-watering and a never ending cycle of nitrogen feeding weakens SA to the point that it becomes susceptible to diseases and infestations.

IMO any turf, if given the proper conditions to develop resistance naturally, will perform in the same manner.

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Patriot Services
11-16-2010, 04:32 PM
You're right too many HO's love the scotts bonus s. If a little is good more is better. Water? Sure, screw the restrictions all night every night. Grows 6" a week, must be doing the right thing.
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Landscape Poet
11-16-2010, 06:11 PM
Let me tell you a little story... we live on five acres in Central Fl. We bought the property in the mid 80's from an older lady whose husband had recently passed away. The house is a 70's ranch and in those days it was common for home owners to lay St. Augustine only on the front yard and the rest leave it to the Bahia.

From what I could tell then, they never fertilized nor irrigated anything. For environmental reasons we also decided not to do any of it either even though we have a well.

The result?... In season, our SA looks better than any I have seen, off season it goes dormant but never really dies off, and once the rains start again it takes off. For over 20 years at least, this grass has never been fed nor has it ever needed any pesticide.

Let me make it clear, it has never had cinch bug or any other problem other than some assorted weed here and there.

I'm of the opinion that over-watering and a never ending cycle of nitrogen feeding weakens SA to the point that it becomes susceptible to diseases and infestations.

IMO any turf, if given the proper conditions to develop resistance naturally, will perform in the same manner.

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I agree with you - that is what I was saying about if Floratam being properly feed. To often it seems that too many people think they need to feed it all the time (both water and fertilizer) - and they never pay attention to the soil. In your properties case the microbes are doing their thing and taking care of the soil.
Too often - homeowners think that fert and a overabundance of water is the answer - when in reality that is the problem.

Keith
11-16-2010, 08:45 PM
Let me tell you a little story... we live on five acres in Central Fl. We bought the property in the mid 80's from an older lady whose husband had recently passed away. The house is a 70's ranch and in those days it was common for home owners to lay St. Augustine only on the front yard and the rest leave it to the Bahia.

From what I could tell then, they never fertilized nor irrigated anything. For environmental reasons we also decided not to do any of it either even though we have a well.

The result?... In season, our SA looks better than any I have seen, off season it goes dormant but never really dies off, and once the rains start again it takes off. For over 20 years at least, this grass has never been fed nor has it ever needed any pesticide.

Let me make it clear, it has never had cinch bug or any other problem other than some assorted weed here and there.

I'm of the opinion that over-watering and a never ending cycle of nitrogen feeding weakens SA to the point that it becomes susceptible to diseases and infestations.

IMO any turf, if given the proper conditions to develop resistance naturally, will perform in the same manner.



I've seen this many times. St. Augustine lawns that have never, or at least rarely ever had any chemical fertilizer or pesticide put on them, yet they thrive.

Most of the ones that I have seen that have done the best are ones that the St. Augustine ran from another lawn or another part of the lawn. A good friend of mine had a neighbor with no sprinkler system and bahia grass. The yard two houses down had St. Augustine. The St. Augustine completely overtook the bahia within a few years and does pretty good. It may not be the greenest in the middle of summer, but it doesn't grow out of control either. The house that originally had the St. Augustine has had to replace theirs several times.

Keith
11-16-2010, 08:48 PM
Same here. Water, nutrients, chemicals...

How prominent is the dollar spot Keith?

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It's not bad. It has had it before and went away. I noticed the yellowing of individual leaves a few days ago, and today saw the little straw colored patches. The spots are relatively small. No more than 6" x 3", and there are probably five or six of them.


They look about like this http://www.forestryimages.org/images/768x512/5262031.jpg

GreenT
11-16-2010, 09:21 PM
The St. Augustine completely overtook the bahia within a few years and does pretty good..


That's my situation. It went from a small area -basically in front of the house - and now it is covering over an acre. Bahia cannot thrive in shade, at all, so when the SA moves in and shades it, it kills it and takes over.

Watching the whole process is better than video games... :)

Oh Lord... I gotta get a life...... :laugh:

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rob7233
11-16-2010, 10:00 PM
Captiva is a relatively new release from UF. A number of sod growers in southern FL had issues with contamination with their fields so production has been pulled back. There are a few that still have it currently available last time I checked.

Currently it's showing some chinch bug resistance compared to Floratam

It is the smallest SA cultivar available of the semi-dwarf group, so much that some consider it a true dwarf. Because of this, it can be considered a lower input turf. The growth habit is tight with internodal length being very short. It is recommeded to be maintained at a shorter length due to potential thatch buildup. Again the length that it is maintained at, is dependent on what maintence level you want to keep it at and your location, microclimate and other cultural practices.

Plants don't waste water(over-irrigate), People do. I love to hear people that maintain lawns on a lean diet(those lawns become more drought and disease resistant and sustainable)
I also understand lean diet living works well for people seeking longer lives too. Less can be more... More issues are caused by over fertilizing with too much N causing brown or large patch etc.

It is said that Captiva has such a slow vertical growth rate, that it takes 3 weeks of growth to match 1 week of growth in Floratam. That said, It could potentailly reduce income of those that sod with it. For example, Mr. homeowner to LCO: "My lawn doesn't need cutting this week either. Just go ahead and skip me again."

More info here:
http://www.sodsolutions.com/about/captiva/professionals/cap_characteristics

GreenT
11-17-2010, 05:44 PM
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I visited the property with the Captiva today and it looks great.

This with running the irrigation system once a week and no rain since ... 1975. :)

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GreenT
11-17-2010, 05:45 PM
Captiva is a relatively new release from UF.....


Hey Rob, where are you located in CFL?

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Landscape Poet
11-17-2010, 07:08 PM
Hey Rob, where are you located in CFL?

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Both of us are located in the Oviedo area!

GreenT
11-17-2010, 07:11 PM
Both of us are located in the Oviedo area!


Thanks.

I'm just south of Ocala. Horse country and all that jazz. :waving:

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Landscape Poet
11-18-2010, 08:50 AM
Thanks.

I'm just south of Ocala. Horse country and all that jazz. :waving:

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I keep seeing ads for a company offering top dressing from your neck of the woods. I think he calls his product "black Kow" - not sure if he spells it different than the actual bagged product or not. Has a good price on Manure Compost at $35 a yard delivered. Was thinking that since next week is a off week, if time allows I may being grab Rob and heading over there to check out his product.

GreenT
11-18-2010, 10:03 PM
I keep seeing ads for a company offering top dressing from your neck of the woods. I think he calls his product "black Kow" - not sure if he spells it different than the actual bagged product or not. Has a good price on Manure Compost at $35 a yard delivered. Was thinking that since next week is a off week, if time allows I may being grab Rob and heading over there to check out his product.


Thankfully, there's a number of organic soil suppliers around these parts. I used this supplier (http://www.ocalaorganics.net/index.html) last year and had excellent results.

We'll start rejuvenating our color beds starting on the 29th and plan to get about 20 yards from them.

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rob7233
11-18-2010, 10:21 PM
Was thinking that since next week is a off week, if time allows I may being grab Rob and heading over there to check out his product.


Yeah Micheal, that would work for me. You know how to find me. Let me know.

Landscape Poet
11-18-2010, 11:03 PM
Thankfully, there's a number of organic soil suppliers around these parts. I used this supplier (http://www.ocalaorganics.net/index.html) last year and had excellent results.

We'll start rejuvenating our color beds starting on the 29th and plan to get about 20 yards from them.

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thanks for the input Green t - will check them out too if we get up that way next week.

Landscape Poet
11-18-2010, 11:05 PM
Was thinking that since next week is a off week, if time allows I may being grab Rob and heading over there to check out his product.


Yeah Micheal, that would work for me. You know how to find me. Let me know.

Will call you over the weekend Birthday boy....Got to formulate my list of things I need to get done next week. By the way, seen that sod from GVI today, they guy that owns the spray company whos lawn I mow, had his front lawn redone, not bad looking stuff.

MTerryB
01-23-2012, 10:21 AM
It has been over 18 months since this thread started... Any updates from the folks actually using Captiva SA?

GreenT
01-23-2012, 10:34 AM
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Yes, they decided to rip it out and replace it with Floratan, again.

They had too many issues with fungus infestations, watering problems, and in general not being able/willing? to follow a proper management system. Not having an applicator familiar with it didn't help either.

I still think it has potential, if managed correctly.

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Keith
04-04-2012, 01:50 AM
Missed your update. Mine has been in for 21 months. I have decided that I can live with the fungal issues that plague it through the summer and early fall. I have sprayed it once or twice with fungicide, but for the most part I let it do what it wants. The funny thing is, all fungus has occurred in full sun. In the partial shaded area it has never had a single problem.

You learn that it is slow to recover if it gets to a certain point, so I don't like to let it dry out. Floratam, you can get away with it. Semi-dwarfs, don't try it. Captiva is no exception.

Growth is fastest March to June with normal watering. But from July 2010 to December 2011, I think I cut it a grand total of 15 times.

It seemed slow to send out runners in the beginning, but I have successfully grown a tray of plugs from one single sprig in about 6 months (late May to December) with no special attention. The first 3 months were a bit slow covering, but the next 3 they moved out pretty good. I currently have 8 more trays planted from my own plugs, and will start 8 more this month. I plugged a corner of my backyard with Sapphire, and I intend to do another, bigger section with my home-grown Captiva plugs. Seems a good candidate with it's partial shade.

BTW, I felt confident enough in it to put down some Captiva sod in lawn other than mine about 6 weeks ago. I told her of the potential issues, but she loved the color and the idea of it not growing 6 inches in 6 days in the summer. Most of her lawn is bahia, but she wanted stepping stones leading from the drive to the back garden. We basically used the sod to surround the stones to so they would not be sitting above the grade. So it's about a 6' wide by 60' long strip of really nice sod sitting in a sea of bahia. The lawn routinely floods out during hard rains. The strip of sod should also create a barrier to keep water from rushing toward the bed and floating mulch away.