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NafzigerLawn
09-05-2010, 05:59 PM
This week my helper and I were mowing a property that I have been maintaining for at least five years. It is an Emerald Zoysia lawn that we mow with John Deere commercial 21” walk behinds. The customer has had one dog for about 15 years which is pretty much deaf and blind. They have another dog that they adopted three years ago which has not given me much trouble. This week they were keeping their son’s dog that bears amazing resemblance to a pit bull.

My guy was mowing the front yard and I was doing the edging and string trimming. As I trimmed the outside of the fence the new dog came up to the fence and was snarling, growling, and barking at the string trimmer. I decided to try to do the trimming in the back yard and see if the dog was just interested in the string trimmer. I went into the back yard and preceded to back away from the dog while speaking softly to it. However the dog kept approaching me snarling and growling. When it was within a couple of feet from me I tried to kick it, but it jumped up and bit my boot. Then I tried a second time and hit it in the side of the head.

We brought the mower into the back yard and started around the yard. After a few minuets the dog went and lay down. When the bag was full and the mower was shut off, the dog came out started to threaten my guy. We found a 1x2 and I used it to herd the dog back into a corner of the yard so that we could switch bags. I did not hit the dog, but apparently I scared it enough that it jumped the fence.

When the wife of the customer came home I told her what had happened. She yelled at me and said: “THAT DOG HAS NEVER BITTEN ANY-ONE!” I said, “I really don’t care if it hasn’t bitten anyone. That dog was threatening us and we took reasonable measures to protect ourselves.” She kept saying that the dog had never bitten anyone, and I told her that in the future we would not go into the back yard if any of the dogs were loose. She turned and walked away and said in an angry tone, “Well I don’t see why your guy had to carry that stick!”

Later that night the lady’s husband, who I normally work with, called me and asked if we had any trouble with the dogs that day. I told him that we had, and I told him how the dog was behaving. He said calmly, “Did you hit the dog with that stick.” I said, “No sir, we carried the stick as a precaution, and let the dog know that if it tried to attack us it was going to get hit.” He said, now angrily, “THAT DOG HAS NEVER BITTEN ANY-ONE! And if you ever want to mow my yard again you will have to do it by yourself! I do not want your guy mowing my yard ever again! As a matter of fact I don’t want him in my yard, NO! I don’t want him on my property ever again!! Is that understood!?!” I said, “Sir, that is an entirely unreasonable request. That guy works with me and he will be there with me if you want me to mow your yard during normal hours.” He said, “The only way that I will let you keep mowing my yard is if you do it by-your-self, and that’s the way it is!”

So, what would you do or have done?

mikeslawnlandscapeohio
09-05-2010, 06:10 PM
As soon as the guy started to get nasty I would have said. Your final bill will be in the mail,all services are canceled. There are to many lawns out there to mow to put up with problem customers, dogs and so on.

93Chevy
09-05-2010, 06:16 PM
As soon as the guy started to get nasty I would have said. Your final bill will be in the mail,all services are canceled. There are to many lawns out there to mow to put up with problem customers, dogs and so on.

At this point, I'd call him back, well, probably Tuesday, tell him you're cancelling services.

Mowingman
09-05-2010, 06:33 PM
Drop him. You do not need those kind of customers.
Personally, I would have given that dog a face full of string trimmer line at full throttle. In fact, I have done that to vicious dogs that have threatened me, in customers yards. Believe me, they back off in a hurry, and I do not care what the homeowner thought about it. You used great restraint in my opinion.
If for some reason, you think you want to keep doing this lawn, tell the customer that from now on, if one of his dogs threatons you, you will kill it on the spot. He can either work with you, or get someone else to mow.

RussellB
09-05-2010, 06:36 PM
You could offer to show him how the dog acts around your equipment................It may keep the next guy or God forbid, a kid from getting bit. On a side note, I do not let any of my customers yell at me. I will walk away and cancel all future work.

KrayzKajun
09-05-2010, 06:49 PM
somebody needs a visit from the Lawn Ninjas!!! hmmm nice nite time treatment of round-up icecubes!!!

93Chevy
09-05-2010, 06:57 PM
Drop him. You do not need those kind of customers.
Personally, I would have given that dog a face full of string trimmer line at full throttle. In fact, I have done that to vicious dogs that have threatened me, in customers yards. Believe me, they back off in a hurry, and I do not care what the homeowner thought about it. You used great restraint in my opinion.
If for some reason, you think you want to keep doing this lawn, tell the customer that from now on, if one of his dogs threatons you, you will kill it on the spot. He can either work with you, or get someone else to mow.

Believe me, I would not hesitate to drop that dog on the spot for a quick less in animal control. But that's a little unprofessional.

Mickhippy
09-05-2010, 07:02 PM
If the dog (possible pit bull no less) was growling etc, why did you even try and do the yard? There is no way I would go into a yard if any dog was being aggressive towards me.
I would of just let owner know what happened and bill for full mow.

yardguy28
09-05-2010, 07:22 PM
This week my helper and I were mowing a property that I have been maintaining for at least five years. It is an Emerald Zoysia lawn that we mow with John Deere commercial 21” walk behinds. The customer has had one dog for about 15 years which is pretty much deaf and blind. They have another dog that they adopted three years ago which has not given me much trouble. This week they were keeping their son’s dog that bears amazing resemblance to a pit bull.

My guy was mowing the front yard and I was doing the edging and string trimming. As I trimmed the outside of the fence the new dog came up to the fence and was snarling, growling, and barking at the string trimmer. I decided to try to do the trimming in the back yard and see if the dog was just interested in the string trimmer. I went into the back yard and preceded to back away from the dog while speaking softly to it. However the dog kept approaching me snarling and growling. When it was within a couple of feet from me I tried to kick it, but it jumped up and bit my boot. Then I tried a second time and hit it in the side of the head.

if all the dog did was approach you snarling and growling why kick or try to kick or whatever. that was wrong of you and as a dog lover i would report you for animal abuse. it's not like the dog was trying to attack you. i've had plenty of dogs approach me over my life time snarling and growling.

We brought the mower into the back yard and started around the yard. After a few minuets the dog went and lay down. When the bag was full and the mower was shut off, the dog came out started to threaten my guy. We found a 1x2 and I used it to herd the dog back into a corner of the yard so that we could switch bags. I did not hit the dog, but apparently I scared it enough that it jumped the fence.

When the wife of the customer came home I told her what had happened. She yelled at me and said: “THAT DOG HAS NEVER BITTEN ANY-ONE!” I said, “I really don’t care if it hasn’t bitten anyone. That dog was threatening us and we took reasonable measures to protect ourselves.” She kept saying that the dog had never bitten anyone, and I told her that in the future we would not go into the back yard if any of the dogs were loose. She turned and walked away and said in an angry tone, “Well I don’t see why your guy had to carry that stick!”

Later that night the lady’s husband, who I normally work with, called me and asked if we had any trouble with the dogs that day. I told him that we had, and I told him how the dog was behaving. He said calmly, “Did you hit the dog with that stick.” I said, “No sir, we carried the stick as a precaution, and let the dog know that if it tried to attack us it was going to get hit.” He said, now angrily, “THAT DOG HAS NEVER BITTEN ANY-ONE! And if you ever want to mow my yard again you will have to do it by yourself! I do not want your guy mowing my yard ever again! As a matter of fact I don’t want him in my yard, NO! I don’t want him on my property ever again!! Is that understood!?!” I said, “Sir, that is an entirely unreasonable request. That guy works with me and he will be there with me if you want me to mow your yard during normal hours.” He said, “The only way that I will let you keep mowing my yard is if you do it by-your-self, and that’s the way it is!”

So, what would you do or have done?

honestly i don't service property's where the dogs are loose in the yards. even though i own a dog and know to watch out for a dog while i would be mowing or trimming i just don't service a property if a dog is in the yard. i would have done the front yard and then left and made a phone call to the client as to why the back yard was not serviced.

even before that i would have already discussed this with the client before the first service was ever performed. as i said i do not service property's with dogs loose. even though i'm carefull and know to watch out for dogs when working around them, i do not want the responsibility of an accident happening nor do i want that on my conscience.

i think the clients are very justified in being upset and acting that way. if all the dog did was walk your way snarling and growling your actions were NOT necessary. that is not what i would call attack mode for any kind of dog.

if you are afraid of getting bitten that much you should have never set foot in the backyard when you noticed the dog barking at the trimmer from the other side of the fence. and you certainly should not have tried to bring the mower back there after you tried to kick the dog and hit it in the head. if it went that far you should have just said screw this and left. if you have to go to the extreme of defending yourself in that way why keep trying?

N.TX
09-05-2010, 08:27 PM
Next time just shoot the dog and then they wont have to worry about you hitting it with a stick.

93Chevy
09-05-2010, 08:35 PM
Next time just shoot the dog and then they wont have to worry about you hitting it with a stick.

Man, I wish I lived in Texas. I'd get a longer sentence than the gangbangers and drug traffickers up in Pittsburgh.

capetrees
09-05-2010, 09:00 PM
Dump that jerk. Theres too much work out there to get tied up with a fool like that. Let him cut his own lawn. You get bit and the rest of the day and maybe longer will be put in jeopardy. Not to mention if your helper gets bit.

See ya pal. Have your son come cut the lawn! :waving:

whosedog
09-05-2010, 09:14 PM
Let the dog bite you then get a lawyer and sue his ass;you will make more money off the lawsuit then you will ever earn by mowing his lawn.Just in case he locks on have the helper on standby with a pry bar and thick gloves.Make sure you document the bite with a police report and go to the ER and get treated for dog bite.If you have a real sympathetic jury you could get a nice hunk of change,then buy yourself some nice equipment.
I've heard of somebody that had to pay $15,000 for his dog biting the trigger finger of a cop,plus all medical bills and lawyers fees.The cop stuck his hand between 2 dogs that were fighting,his and the guy that he sued,claimed that the other dog damaged his trigger finger.

kilgoja
09-05-2010, 09:49 PM
i just wouldn't have said anything...if they asked i would've said what dog?...but seriously if a dog came at me i would chase him off with the trimmer lol....especially if he bit me...i'd give him a good solid kick in the jaw and he'd never bite anyone again...lol...seriously if they were just keeping the dog short term it won't be there the next time you go to cut...but if they keep on about your helper i would drop them

ajslands
09-05-2010, 09:58 PM
Take a crap on their lawn and say it was their dog. :D
Posted via Mobile Device

NafzigerLawn
09-05-2010, 10:35 PM
honestly i don't service property's where the dogs are loose in the yards. even though i own a dog and know to watch out for a dog while i would be mowing or trimming i just don't service a property if a dog is in the yard. i would have done the front yard and then left and made a phone call to the client as to why the back yard was not serviced.


Thank you for the honest reply! This will be company policy from now on.


“He who rebukes a man will in the end gain more favor than he who has a flattering tongue.” Proverbs 28:23

IndianSprings
09-05-2010, 10:43 PM
The minute the guy started his threatning tone, I would have explained his final bill would be in the mail and it would include an additional 50.00 charge for the dog biting me. If he wanted to argue about the extra 50.00 I'd just call animal control/cops and report the dog biting my foot. They prolly would require him to put the dog down. I'd report the dog regardless to save the next poor lawn service from being bit or worse yet a child being mauled by a pit or pit look alike.

newz7151
09-06-2010, 12:28 AM
somebody needs a visit from the Lawn Ninjas!!! hmmm nice nite time treatment of round-up icecubes!!!

why is it, that ever since i suggested round-up icecubes a long time ago, everybody seems to want to suggest it now?

newz7151
09-06-2010, 12:35 AM
Just in case he locks on have the helper on standby with a pry bar and thick gloves.Make sure you document the bite with a police report and go to the ER and get treated for dog bite.

Why the pry bar and gloves? If the dog locks down and won't let go, tell your helper to stick his finger up the dog's butt and it might let go of its grip. (i mean hey, if it worked on "Weeds" when the dog took Andy's toes off, it must work in real life too.

cgaengineer
09-06-2010, 12:35 AM
Drop him like a bad habit.
Posted via Mobile Device

georgiagrass
09-06-2010, 12:56 AM
honestly i don't service property's where the dogs are loose in the yards. even though i own a dog and know to watch out for a dog while i would be mowing or trimming i just don't service a property if a dog is in the yard. i would have done the front yard and then left and made a phone call to the client as to why the back yard was not serviced.

even before that i would have already discussed this with the client before the first service was ever performed. as i said i do not service property's with dogs loose. even though i'm carefull and know to watch out for dogs when working around them, i do not want the responsibility of an accident happening nor do i want that on my conscience.

I agree. We require customers with dogs to have the dogs out of the yard while we are on the property. This avoids potential injury to the dogs and to the workers.

greendoctor
09-06-2010, 02:42 AM
Bad dog=Azzhole owners. I never met an owner with a good dog that I have had to fire. Dogs are often a reflection of the owner. For example: I service a property that has a 90 lb rottweiler. The owner is a radiologist. Very nice person. Her dog is just as nice, if not nicer. I can tell that great pains were taken to socialize and train the dog. If I need to do something to the back lawn and landscape. It is as simple as calling the dog and leading it to the front yard. No need at all for the owner to stay home in order to manage the dog. On the other hand, I remember declining to offer services to someone with an out of control great dane. They were dismissed before I had to do something drastic to that dog. I love animals of all kinds. However, I have no tolerance for people that make excuses for not having control over their animals. I find that those people are self centered and not in touch with reality.

TheMadOne
09-06-2010, 04:59 PM
I had some troubles with dogs last year while I was distributing some of my door hangers, most of them I was able to just talk down. I purchased one of these in the case that I couldn't:

http://www.stungunsupply.com/product/streetwise-expandable-stun-baton.html

I wear it on my side when doing the door hanger thing now, I've only had to use once. A 120 ish Lbs Rottweiler came dashing across the street from a neighbor's yard all bristled up & went for me. Laid it across it's neck & held the trigger button down for about 4 seconds, the rotty hit the dirt squirming around making an awfully squeal & peeing it's self, got up several seconds later & ran like it's fanny was on fire back to where it came from. Yup, it worked like a charm the dog, who's owner should have been the one to get the voltage, was no worse for the wear in the end. No broken teeth or bones from being struck with a club or boot, just a memory of a very bad encounter.

It looks pretty cheap & cheesy, but it worked great. I keep it in my truck all of the time not on my side when mowing and if an customer's dog became threatening I would simply pack up & leave. Call them later & tell them either restrain the animal when I'm there to mow or find someone else. If the dog was loose & looked like it might try to get a hold of me I'd holster up the "light saber" - stun baton & light the mutt up if it made a grab for me while packing up to leave.

Personally I like most dogs & most are usually friendly to me, having to light one up because the owner is an idiot bothers me, but when it's done the dog is no worse for the wear 15 minutes later. I'd like to give the owner a taste of it though, because as far as I'm concerned these type of incidents are the fault of the dog's owner not the animal for the most part.

yardguy28
09-06-2010, 06:07 PM
you guys that have problems with dogs really need to start avoiding these places.

some people actually get dogs to keep people OFF there property believe it or not.

i'm sensing some sort of attitude that you have a right to be on peoples propertys no matter what and your gonna do it.

if your passing out flyers and there is a snarly, growling dog that can get at you, that property should be skipped. clearly the owner doens't want people on there property.

if your clients have dogs they need to be required to keep them in doors while you are there.

dogs being in a yard while working is just as dangerous as children being in the yard and i bet none of you would service a yard with a child or children playing in it.

TheMadOne
09-06-2010, 07:27 PM
U dont reed so good so ill try writing it mor so u can reed it beter!

A 120 ish Lbs Rottweiler came dashing across the street from a neighbor's yard all bristled up & went for me.

Don't think they owned the sidewalk on the OTHER side of the road! Maybe I could be wrong here, but even then........ it was a public sidewalk.


I keep it in my truck all of the time not on my side when mowing and if an customer's dog became threatening I would simply pack up & leave. Call them later & tell them either restrain the animal when I'm there to mow or find someone else. If the dog was loose & looked like it might try to get a hold of me I'd holster up the "light saber" - stun baton & light the mutt up if it made a grab for me while packing up to leave.

Or is that you just start typing without reading an entire post?!

Don't normally respond to this type of someone just having to say something to try show how much smarter they are than the rest of us, but you should at least read and understand something before you comment. It makes you look silly :dizzy:

yardguy28
09-06-2010, 08:01 PM
U dont reed so good so ill try writing it mor so u can reed it beter!



Don't think they owned the sidewalk on the OTHER side of the road! Maybe I could be wrong here, but even then........ it was a public sidewalk.



Or is that you just start typing without reading an entire post?!

Don't normally respond to this type of someone just having to say something to try show how much smarter they are than the rest of us, but you should at least read and understand something before you comment. It makes you look silly :dizzy:

i actually think it makes you look silly since you just ass u med i was directing my comments towards you.

but in the end i'm not really concerned with what you think of me or anyone else for that matter.........

Cloud9Landscapes
09-06-2010, 08:17 PM
Dogs are a major pain in the ass for all landscapers. They poop on the grass then we run it over. The pee ruins grass. They tear up new sod. They always escape out the gate. Just yesterday I was mowing an account and this stupid little dog bolts out the side gate while I was blowing and I had to chase it down. Only been bit once.

yardguy28
09-06-2010, 08:23 PM
Dogs are a major pain in the ass for all landscapers. They poop on the grass then we run it over. The pee ruins grass. They tear up new sod. They always escape out the gate. Just yesterday I was mowing an account and this stupid little dog bolts out the side gate while I was blowing and I had to chase it down. Only been bit once.

make the home owner have it cleaned up. its a common thing with a lot of lco's. theres an extra charge if it isn't.......

as for the gate thing. a prime example why i make my clients keep there dogs in the house when i'm there to service there property.

Cloud9Landscapes
09-06-2010, 11:31 PM
Seems like there is always that stray poop or where the dog as pooped right before we get there. But yes, we do charge them generally.

txirrigation
09-06-2010, 11:53 PM
I charge extra if the yard has an excessive amount of poo.

To the original poster... To some dog owners dogs are like kids, and they WILL NEVER be in the wrong.

Hind sight is 20/20 but if I was in your situation I would have never gone in the back yard after the dog snarled at the edger. Then I would have called the home owner and explained that the new dog in the back yard seems to be scared by the edger and is acting aggressive.

Then I would have told them that I will be back next week, and to please have the dog restrained for both of our well beings.

ajslands
09-06-2010, 11:56 PM
Ya so if anybody kicked my dog, I would go a kick their aSh!
Posted via Mobile Device

topsites
09-07-2010, 12:09 AM
<post edited>

sdk1959
09-07-2010, 12:20 AM
As other posters have said you should not have serviced the backyard with the dog there especially it growled at you behind from the fence. You should have then contacted the customer and told them you did not service the backyard because of the dog and it's temperament. If the customer makes light of it saying the dog never bit anyone before, say that may be true but no animals in the yard when I cut it is my policy. Tell them I'm sure you don't want any chance of your dog getting hurt or me or my helper getting bitten and my lawyer contacting you for damages. That will get them thinking, dog should be in the house the day you cut.

yardguy28
09-07-2010, 07:23 AM
Seems like there is always that stray poop or where the dog as pooped right before we get there. But yes, we do charge them generally.

a stray poop doesn't really bother me. those are usually detectable and dodge-able. its the one's that are full of poop because the owners never pick it up. those are the one's i don't like doing. thats why there is a policy. either you clean up after the dog or i will charge extra because i either have to clean it up or i have to clean my mower up.

I charge extra if the yard has an excessive amount of poo.

To the original poster... To some dog owners dogs are like kids, and they WILL NEVER be in the wrong.

Hind sight is 20/20 but if I was in your situation I would have never gone in the back yard after the dog snarled at the edger. Then I would have called the home owner and explained that the new dog in the back yard seems to be scared by the edger and is acting aggressive.

Then I would have told them that I will be back next week, and to please have the dog restrained for both of our well beings.

As other posters have said you should not have serviced the backyard with the dog there especially it growled at you behind from the fence. You should have then contacted the customer and told them you did not service the backyard because of the dog and it's temperament. If the customer makes light of it saying the dog never bit anyone before, say that may be true but no animals in the yard when I cut it is my policy. Tell them I'm sure you don't want any chance of your dog getting hurt or me or my helper getting bitten and my lawyer contacting you for damages. That will get them thinking, dog should be in the house the day you cut.

i don't think asking the owner to have the dog "restrained" is the correct thing to say. i just tell them to keep the dogs in the house. restrained implys the animal is vicious and muzzles and tying it to one area is needed.

also threating with a lawyer is not necessary either. keep in mind guys this happened ONCE. there's not been multipul occurrences with the same client. being a hot head and telling them to have there dog restrained or that your lawyer will contact them should something happen is not the way to handle a one time, first occurrence.

you just need to politely tell the client they need to keep there dog inside the house because it is your policy not to service yards with animals or children in them.

TheMadOne
09-07-2010, 10:14 AM
i actually think it makes you look silly since you just ass u med i was directing my comments towards you.

but in the end i'm not really concerned with what you think of me or anyone else for that matter.........


Sorry I guess you don't really mean what you type, my bad, don't know how I could have seen your remarks as being condensending. I just must not have the cognative super noodle power you possess to be able to read beyond what was actually written.

if your passing out flyers and there is a snarly, growling dog that can get at you, that property should be skipped. clearly the owner doens't want people on there property.

Perhaps you "misspoke" huh! If you make a comment, even if you say something you obviously hadn't intended then have the cojones to own it, not start back stepping.

As for you don't know you, don't care one way or the other, probably wouldn't have much to do with you if this is how you roll. I just like people who mean what they say & own it if they have made a statement they get called on. Nuff said, have a great day!

txgrassguy
09-07-2010, 10:22 AM
First of all, regardless of whatever agreement you may have had to service the owner's property - you were in the wrong when a strange dog was acting predatory - and you continued to mow the property.
At the first sign of an aggressive animal you should have packed up and gone on the next property. Simply tell the property owner the animal needs to be kept in doors/away from the property when you are scheduled for service on a particular day. Charge the client the normal rate for your service as it wasn't your fault the animal wasn't properly contained.

When, a long ways back, I was a municipal police officer I got a call about a dog bite. Show up and a LCO was lying on the ground with a bite in his calf, a dog whimpering in the back yard all torn up, and a very irate citizen.
Long story short, the LCO sued for medical bills/lost time and lost big time for continuing to try to enter a gated rear yard to mow the property despite the dog acting aggressively. Dude had to pay the vet bills as well for the dog he struck with the hand trimmer. The reason he lost was due to continually trying to enter a gated property with an aggressive dog instead of simply going on to his next property - his actions were indefensible as the service he was performing was not vital such as a firefighter or police officer responding to a distress call from the residence.

I will say I have been threatened by dogs, both domesticated and feral but never with-in the confines of a gated property. Some ran when I turned to face them, others I shot on the spot.

My company policy, which is enforced, is the same as an non-essential service provider - if my crew or I have to enter a gated property with an aggressively acting animal quite simply we don't. Property owner gets charged full price for the service call but we never, ever force an entry.

Additionally I do not judge a person for defending themselves if attacked in an open environment, however, had you entered my gated property despite an animal acting aggressively then either kicked or swung on the animal I'd fire you for a monumental lapse in judgment. Had you injured the animal in the process I'd have you arrested as well. The client was justifiably upset as you failed to exercise any sort of reasonable judgment - quite frankly I'm surprised he didn't fire you right then.

cut level
09-07-2010, 01:02 PM
I hate this happened to ya but you did go back there knowing the dog wasnt liking you being there. Then you kicked at the dog. Should have just left, called the owner explained the situation. Let them get home and put the dog up and finish the yard. After that a cordial conversation on how to handle mowing and what the owner could or will do so you dont have to worry about the dog. I am sure they would have obliged you especially if they like ya and you do a good job on the yard. Now you have a big pile of poop on your hands and probably one less customer. Hindsight is always 20/20

yardguy28
09-07-2010, 01:33 PM
Sorry I guess you don't really mean what you type, my bad, don't know how I could have seen your remarks as being condensending. I just must not have the cognative super noodle power you possess to be able to read beyond what was actually written.



Perhaps you "misspoke" huh! If you make a comment, even if you say something you obviously hadn't intended then have the cojones to own it, not start back stepping.

As for you don't know you, don't care one way or the other, probably wouldn't have much to do with you if this is how you roll. I just like people who mean what they say & own it if they have made a statement they get called on. Nuff said, have a great day!

uh yeah ok whatever,

my comments were made in general for anyone who passes out flyers and anyone that has problems with the dogs like thread starter did.

if my comments were directed specifically towards you i would have quoted you in my post.

so if you want to take it directly towards you be my guest but i'm not gonna feel bad about it.

and i mean what i say, every last word.......

DitchDr
09-07-2010, 06:08 PM
Had a dog bite me once, so I bit him back. We have been buddies ever since, sometimes he hops on the mower if I happen to be the one mowing that lawn that day.

Az Gardener
09-07-2010, 06:31 PM
Am I the only one who has been bitten by dogs that don't bite? That's the kiss of death for me. If a client says "oh don't worry she has never bitten anyone" that's the dogs cue to take a nip at my ankle, azz or one time my crotch. It never seems to fail. I'm just surprised that no one else in 4 pages has had the same experience.

A dog that has not bitten anyone is like a biker who has not crashed. Eventually biker lays it down and dog bites.

yardguy28
09-07-2010, 06:38 PM
Am I the only one who has been bitten by dogs that don't bite? That's the kiss of death for me. If a client says "oh don't worry she has never bitten anyone" that's the dogs cue to take a nip at my ankle, azz or one time my crotch. It never seems to fail. I'm just surprised that no one else in 4 pages has had the same experience.

A dog that has not bitten anyone is like a biker who has not crashed. Eventually biker lays it down and dog bites.

if you cut grass with dogs in the yard then yes you probably are.

since i don't cut yards while the dog is in the yard i don't have to worry about that.

corey4671
09-07-2010, 08:24 PM
:clapping: +1 :clapping::clapping:Drop him. You do not need those kind of customers.
Personally, I would have given that dog a face full of string trimmer line at full throttle. In fact, I have done that to vicious dogs that have threatened me, in customers yards. Believe me, they back off in a hurry, and I do not care what the homeowner thought about it. You used great restraint in my opinion.
If for some reason, you think you want to keep doing this lawn, tell the customer that from now on, if one of his dogs threatons you, you will kill it on the spot. He can either work with you, or get someone else to mow.

ajslands
09-07-2010, 08:30 PM
If you put a trimmer in my dogs face, I'll put a trimmer and your face.

Btw, you're an idiot for going in that yard while their was a dig in it and I'm sure someone will agree with me on that. Also if I was that homeowner, you wouldnt be allowed on my property!

ajslands
09-07-2010, 08:36 PM
you guys that have problems with dogs really need to start avoiding these places.

some people actually get dogs to keep people OFF there property believe it or not.

i'm sensing some sort of attitude that you have a right to be on peoples propertys no matter what and your gonna do it.

if your passing out flyers and there is a snarly, growling dog that can get at you, that property should be skipped. clearly the owner doens't want people on there property.


if your clients have dogs they need to be required to keep them in doors while you are there.

dogs being in a yard while working is just as dangerous as children being in the yard and i bet none of you would service a yard with a child or children playing in it.


This has to e one of the best answers! :clapping:
Posted via Mobile Device

yardguy28
09-07-2010, 09:19 PM
If you put a trimmer in my dogs face, I'll put a trimmer and your face.

Btw, you're an idiot for going in that yard while their was a dig in it and I'm sure someone will agree with me on that. Also if I was that homeowner, you wouldnt be allowed on my property!

i'm glad i'm not the only one who feels he was in the wrong in going into the backyard.

i am a dog owner and i will cut my grass with my dog in it so i know how to watch out for the dog but i would never go into a clients property with a dog in it. you either keep the dog in the house while i'm there or i don't cut that part of the lawn (which is usually the whole backyard).

bradseabridge
09-07-2010, 09:57 PM
yeah really why would you go into a yard with a tooth and gum dog? That's just ******ed. Matter of fact why go into any yard with a dog in it.

Az Gardener
09-07-2010, 10:01 PM
if you cut grass with dogs in the yard then yes you probably are.

since i don't cut yards while the dog is in the yard i don't have to worry about that.

I don't cut grass. I sure wouldn't go near a growling snarling dog. Every time I have been bitten it was while I was walking around with the homeowner asking them questions prior to generating a bid.

RussellB
09-07-2010, 10:02 PM
I agree, why enter a yard with a dog in it? Ask the owner to bring the dog in or leave a note that you will return in the morning. Also, if you open a gate.......CLOSE THE GATE!

kilgoja
09-07-2010, 10:30 PM
i've never cut a yard that had a dog in it...i do one yard that has a dog in the backyard with a wooden fence around it but they only ask me to cut the front yard lol

whosedog
09-08-2010, 10:01 AM
All dogs will bite to defend themselves ,some of the guard breeds are more aggressive,because it's the nature of the breed.The dog on the right of my avatar,chomped on my leg when he was trying to get at a husky that challenged him.I got stuck with him when his owner died and took him in rather than sending him to a shelter where he would no doubt be put down due to his aggressive nature.We are trying to retrain him(he's really a case for the dog whisperer)he has bitten 4 people prior to us getting him; but it's really hard to erase 6 years of bad handling by his prior owner.He's a yugoslavian mountain dog, bred to guard livestock from wolves,coyotes,bears etc. in the absence of livestock he guards my family,like they were a flock of sheep and will bite anyone who comes on our property.Despite large warning signs (beware of dog) one dopey (STONED)kid came into our yard,then ran out trying to outrun Jake,without latching the gate behind him.He got bit on his ass a quick chomp and release,and we caught Jake,when he went to take a leak on a pole across the street.The bite was never reported like the other 4 and we never see that stoner around anymore,which is OK with us.
I know somebody is going to say that I'm a bad owner,for not being able to stop him from biting,but it's been bred into this dog ,it's an ancient breed,and he wasn't trained well for 6 years.If anybody has suggestions on how to make him gentle,I'm all ears;in the meantime stay out of my yard!

txgrassguy
09-08-2010, 03:00 PM
Why worry about your dog as long as he is gentle with you and your family?

I have a very good friend whom raises English Mastiff's, those hugeassed dogs which while not trained very well respond well when he is around. Try to enter a gate when those dogs are there and he isn't and you've signed up to be lunch. Walk through with him and those dogs are big pussy cats. Personally I see nothing wrong with this.

When my faithful lab finally goes to her great hunting ground I am going to acquire either a German Shepherd or a Dutch Malinois from a friend of mine that rehabs dogs that failed police training for some reason or another. I will get a very well obedience trained animal for pennies on the dollar, who cares if it doesn't like concrete or slick floors but it will sure make a good guard dog/companion for me.

ajslands
09-08-2010, 03:09 PM
All dogs will bite to defend themselves ,some of the guard breeds are more aggressive,because it's the nature of the breed.The dog on the right of my avatar,chomped on my leg when he was trying to get at a husky that challenged him.I got stuck with him when his owner died and took him in rather than sending him to a shelter where he would no doubt be put down due to his aggressive nature.We are trying to retrain him(he's really a case for the dog whisperer)he has bitten 4 people prior to us getting him; but it's really hard to erase 6 years of bad handling by his prior owner.He's a yugoslavian mountain dog, bred to guard livestock from wolves,coyotes,bears etc. in the absence of livestock he guards my family,like they were a flock of sheep and will bite anyone who comes on our property.Despite large warning signs (beware of dog) one dopey (STONED)kid came into our yard,then ran out trying to outrun Jake,without latching the gate behind him.He got bit on his ass a quick chomp and release,and we caught Jake,when he went to take a leak on a pole across the street.The bite was never reported like the other 4 and we never see that stoner around anymore,which is OK with us.
I know somebody is going to say that I'm a bad owner,for not being able to stop him from biting,but it's been bred into this dog ,it's an ancient breed,and he wasn't trained well for 6 years.If anybody has suggestions on how to make him gentle,I'm all ears;in the meantime stay out of my yard!


That must have taken a realy long time to write!
But to the op, I think the dog should have bit you for getting a piece if wood or you're employee whoever it was.
Posted via Mobile Device

Mark Oomkes
09-08-2010, 03:20 PM
This really isn't rocket science folks.

Thankfully a few responded properly.

The dog was protecting its territory, plain and simple. Don't enter its territory without its master and everyone will be happy.

BTW, you kick my dog for doing what is natural and we will have issues, assuming he doesn't take care of you first.

If the dog (possible pit bull no less) was growling etc, why did you even try and do the yard? There is no way I would go into a yard if any dog was being aggressive towards me.
I would of just let owner know what happened and bill for full mow.

Some common sense, bless you.

Next time just shoot the dog and then they wont have to worry about you hitting it with a stick.

lol

Let the dog bite you then get a lawyer and sue his ass;you will make more money off the lawsuit then you will ever earn by mowing his lawn.Just in case he locks on have the helper on standby with a pry bar and thick gloves.Make sure you document the bite with a police report and go to the ER and get treated for dog bite.If you have a real sympathetic jury you could get a nice hunk of change,then buy yourself some nice equipment.
I've heard of somebody that had to pay $15,000 for his dog biting the trigger finger of a cop,plus all medical bills and lawyers fees.The cop stuck his hand between 2 dogs that were fighting,his and the guy that he sued,claimed that the other dog damaged his trigger finger.

You betcha, the American way. You do something wrong and then sue someone else.

Please tell me this post was in jest.

Also, in MI, if the dog is on the owner's property, there is little if any liability if the dog bites someone else coming on to that property. So this bit of advice may be ignorant at best and is plain old disgusting any way about it.

As other posters have said you should not have serviced the backyard with the dog there especially it growled at you behind from the fence. You should have then contacted the customer and told them you did not service the backyard because of the dog and it's temperament. If the customer makes light of it saying the dog never bit anyone before, say that may be true but no animals in the yard when I cut it is my policy. Tell them I'm sure you don't want any chance of your dog getting hurt or me or my helper getting bitten and my lawyer contacting you for damages. That will get them thinking, dog should be in the house the day you cut.

:clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping:


i don't think asking the owner to have the dog "restrained" is the correct thing to say. i just tell them to keep the dogs in the house. restrained implys the animal is vicious and muzzles and tying it to one area is needed.

You need to invest in a dictionary. Restrained does not imply that a dog is vicious in any sense. It means the dog is under control.

re·strain (r-strn)
tr.v. re·strained, re·strain·ing, re·strains
1.
a. To hold back or keep in check; control: couldn't restrain the tears.
b. To hold (a person) back; prevent: restrained them from going.
2. To deprive of freedom or liberty.
3. To limit or restrict.

also threating with a lawyer is not necessary either. keep in mind guys this happened ONCE. there's not been multipul occurrences with the same client. being a hot head and telling them to have there dog restrained or that your lawyer will contact them should something happen is not the way to handle a one time, first occurrence.

you just need to politely tell the client they need to keep there dog inside the house because it is your policy not to service yards with animals or children in them.

Agreed on the rest, though.

First of all, regardless of whatever agreement you may have had to service the owner's property - you were in the wrong when a strange dog was acting predatory - and you continued to mow the property.
At the first sign of an aggressive animal you should have packed up and gone on the next property. Simply tell the property owner the animal needs to be kept in doors/away from the property when you are scheduled for service on a particular day. Charge the client the normal rate for your service as it wasn't your fault the animal wasn't properly contained.

When, a long ways back, I was a municipal police officer I got a call about a dog bite. Show up and a LCO was lying on the ground with a bite in his calf, a dog whimpering in the back yard all torn up, and a very irate citizen.
Long story short, the LCO sued for medical bills/lost time and lost big time for continuing to try to enter a gated rear yard to mow the property despite the dog acting aggressively. Dude had to pay the vet bills as well for the dog he struck with the hand trimmer. The reason he lost was due to continually trying to enter a gated property with an aggressive dog instead of simply going on to his next property - his actions were indefensible as the service he was performing was not vital such as a firefighter or police officer responding to a distress call from the residence.

I will say I have been threatened by dogs, both domesticated and feral but never with-in the confines of a gated property. Some ran when I turned to face them, others I shot on the spot.

My company policy, which is enforced, is the same as an non-essential service provider - if my crew or I have to enter a gated property with an aggressively acting animal quite simply we don't. Property owner gets charged full price for the service call but we never, ever force an entry.

Additionally I do not judge a person for defending themselves if attacked in an open environment, however, had you entered my gated property despite an animal acting aggressively then either kicked or swung on the animal I'd fire you for a monumental lapse in judgment. Had you injured the animal in the process I'd have you arrested as well. The client was justifiably upset as you failed to exercise any sort of reasonable judgment - quite frankly I'm surprised he didn't fire you right then.

Thank goodness for common sense in the judicial system.

kilgoja
09-08-2010, 04:48 PM
spay or neuter your pets then they won't be so aggressive

dave k
09-09-2010, 07:44 PM
carry pepper spray with you or wasp spray and that will do the trick, wasp spray can shoot quite far....

yardguy28
09-09-2010, 07:59 PM
but if you make it a policy to not go into yards with dogs in them you won't need to carry either......

mmcda18
09-12-2010, 12:10 AM
Am I the only one who has been bitten by dogs that don't bite? That's the kiss of death for me. If a client says "oh don't worry she has never bitten anyone" that's the dogs cue to take a nip at my ankle, azz or one time my crotch. It never seems to fail. I'm just surprised that no one else in 4 pages has had the same experience.

A dog that has not bitten anyone is like a biker who has not crashed. Eventually biker lays it down and dog bites.

DUDE! the same thing has happened to me twice!!!! same client, same dog (stupid me)
First time i cut this guys yard he has a 6 month old mastiff that has to weigh 100 pounds (thing was massive). I ask the client to put his dog up and he says oh don't worry he's just a big baby he won't do anything to ya... Bull Sh**. I walk in the gate and as soon as i turn my back and hit the throttle on the weed-eater the dog latches onto my calf muscle. I turned around punched the dog as hard as i could square in the snout. Knocked him down he turned around to come back again and i weed-eated up his nose and hobbled out of the gate. Knocked on the door and told the client what happened (no really serious damage to me, just a couple surface breaks and terrible bruises). The client COMPLETELY took my side on my reaction to what his dog had done. I finished the yard and left.
The next week i go to the same yard and ask the guy to put his dog inside, and after the last weeks ordeal, he agrees. I finish the yard and knock on the door to his office (garage office) he opens the door and walks back to his desk to write the check (leaving the door open) the dog is laying on the floor next to him. The dog looks up, sees me, doesn't growl, snarl, or show any aggressive signs to me at all. He slowly walks up to me and i hold my ground and when he gets a couple feet away he just wraps his whole head around my waist. I saw him open his mouth this time and started my punch before he had fully sunken his teeth in me. I punched him as hard as i could and actually knocked the dog completely out. The client jumped up from his desk and started beating his dog for what he had just done. He kept yelling "he's never done that to anyone before, i'm soo sorry i'm soo sorry". I told him i wouldn't be cutting his yard anymore after that because the dog obviously had negative feelings toward me. Ended on good terms and the client actually recommended me to a couple more people who i still cut.

beegreenlandcare
09-12-2010, 01:49 AM
First of all, regardless of whatever agreement you may have had to service the owner's property - you were in the wrong when a strange dog was acting predatory - and you continued to mow the property.
At the first sign of an aggressive animal you should have packed up and gone on the next property. Simply tell the property owner the animal needs to be kept in doors/away from the property when you are scheduled for service on a particular day. Charge the client the normal rate for your service as it wasn't your fault the animal wasn't properly contained.

When, a long ways back, I was a municipal police officer I got a call about a dog bite. Show up and a LCO was lying on the ground with a bite in his calf, a dog whimpering in the back yard all torn up, and a very irate citizen.
Long story short, the LCO sued for medical bills/lost time and lost big time for continuing to try to enter a gated rear yard to mow the property despite the dog acting aggressively. Dude had to pay the vet bills as well for the dog he struck with the hand trimmer. The reason he lost was due to continually trying to enter a gated property with an aggressive dog instead of simply going on to his next property - his actions were indefensible as the service he was performing was not vital such as a firefighter or police officer responding to a distress call from the residence.

I will say I have been threatened by dogs, both domesticated and feral but never with-in the confines of a gated property. Some ran when I turned to face them, others I shot on the spot.

My company policy, which is enforced, is the same as an non-essential service provider - if my crew or I have to enter a gated property with an aggressively acting animal quite simply we don't. Property owner gets charged full price for the service call but we never, ever force an entry.

Additionally I do not judge a person for defending themselves if attacked in an open environment, however, had you entered my gated property despite an animal acting aggressively then either kicked or swung on the animal I'd fire you for a monumental lapse in judgment. Had you injured the animal in the process I'd have you arrested as well. The client was justifiably upset as you failed to exercise any sort of reasonable judgment - quite frankly I'm surprised he didn't fire you right then.

My opinion, this IS THE BEST ADVICE! Your NOT providing a emergency service for criminy sake! You guys are going into a fenced in area(the dogs territory) YOU SHOULDN'T BE THERE without the owners presence(at least). Just go away and work it out with the HO later:walking: I too would fire your azz for being mean to my dog when there are other, more intelligent ways to work it out:rolleyes: I would make arrangements(if I where the HO) to have the dog inside if/when I knew you where coming

cut level
09-12-2010, 09:13 AM
I cant believe this stupid thread is still alive muchless at the top. I think we are all tired of this thread it officially sucks now and we all agree on what we think he should have done. Lets kill it.

Yall have a good Sunday, we worked til 8 last nite mowing so I can MOVE today, they finished our house yesterday as well.

yardguy28
09-12-2010, 09:46 AM
My opinion, this IS THE BEST ADVICE! Your NOT providing a emergency service for criminy sake! You guys are going into a fenced in area(the dogs territory) YOU SHOULDN'T BE THERE without the owners presence(at least). Just go away and work it out with the HO later:walking: I too would fire your azz for being mean to my dog when there are other, more intelligent ways to work it out:rolleyes: I would make arrangements(if I where the HO) to have the dog inside if/when I knew you where coming

emergency service or not. i do NOT go into yards with animals or kids in them.

I cant believe this stupid thread is still alive muchless at the top. I think we are all tired of this thread it officially sucks now and we all agree on what we think he should have done. Lets kill it.

Yall have a good Sunday, we worked til 8 last nite mowing so I can MOVE today, they finished our house yesterday as well.

just because you have no more interest in this thread doesn't mean others don't.

if you've been so busy working and are gonna be so busy moving then how do you find the time to post in thread you no longer have interest in :dizzy:

whosedog
09-12-2010, 10:58 AM
I cant believe this stupid thread is still alive muchless at the top. I think we are all tired of this thread it officially sucks now and we all agree on what we think he should have done. Lets kill it.

Yall have a good Sunday, we worked til 8 last nite mowing so I can MOVE today, they finished our house yesterday as well.

All you have to do if you don't want to stay here is click on unsubscribe from thread bottom part of up- date and you will no longer be notified on new posts.Good bye,adios amigo,later dude,auf wiedersehen...:waving:

DA Quality Lawn & YS
09-13-2010, 05:31 PM
OP - drop this customer.

I CANNOT STAND customers that treat their pets better than you, who by the way is working hard to make their property look good.
My policy is, if I see loose dogs or even leashed ones on any part of the property I am working, sianara.

flatlander42
09-13-2010, 11:35 PM
I agree with all of you, well some of you.....I mean a few of you.


In the dogs home turf, you are probably in the wrong.

On public property I will not have a dog bite me w/o my steel toe boots moving at a rapid pace to keep the animal away from me.

I was walking down the sidewalk a few blocks away from my house and there was an old guy reading the sunday paper with his wiener dogs running around him. Those little bastards were hell bent to try and bite my ankles. Up went my boot once,*strength adjusted for small dogs* and no more bite threat. Didn't set there and beat the chit out of the little dogs but I am not letting em bite me. Actually the owner was more upset than I was.

Craig3
09-18-2010, 02:24 AM
Am I the only one who has been bitten by dogs that don't bite? That's the kiss of death for me. If a client says "oh don't worry she has never bitten anyone" that's the dogs cue to take a nip at my ankle, azz or one time my crotch. It never seems to fail. I'm just surprised that no one else in 4 pages has had the same experience.

A dog that has not bitten anyone is like a biker who has not crashed. Eventually biker lays it down and dog bites.

been there. Now baxter doesn't get to be out when I'm coming to mow that day. Little bastard nipped my calf.

newjerseylandscaping
09-28-2010, 05:26 PM
Ok i think THat i have to agree you were in the wrond in both entering the proproty at all and in kicking the dog. Im very protected of my dogs and i have neibers wich wach my proproty during the day, if they told me what happed there would be bad new bears in boh our lives the next time you came, also the statement of it looked like a pitbull is totally ignorant. pitbulls are actually a docile breed and ive personnally never had a problom. i have it written in my contract that all dogs must be tied up or they will pay double that week due to the fact i will have to come back, also if there is alot of debris and toys and so on i also have that written, they know if there is alot of stuff there getting charged for it.

2brothersyardcare
09-28-2010, 06:43 PM
he bit me would have goten my blade 2 its head

AndyTblc
09-28-2010, 07:06 PM
one of my accounts has a dog. I mow next to it's cage it barks, and wags it's tail. But if I stick my had to the fence, he gets aggressive. But when the owner lets it roam the yard, I can go right past it, and it just lays in the grass watching me, no problem. The owner isn't in site. I think it's just protective and aggressive when it's in it's cage. When when it's free roaming then it's a friendly dog.
Then another one of my accounts, has a neighbor that has a ankle biter and a golden retriever. They bark at my mower and follows me up along their fence line, then if I stop for a second, the golden retriever jumps up on the fence, I stick my hand out to it, and it sniffs and licks, then when I start going it just starts running and barking again.
Then my neighbor has a boxer/bull. This thing looks like it would kill you if you ran across it. Well when they moved in a year ago, they said it was a big baby. And that it is. They leave it tied up in their back yard to their trampoline. So I'll go in their yard and give it attention and pet it. And it just gives way and lets me rub it's stomach and wags its 3 inch tail.
At our block party the neighbors seen it and said it looks mean, so I took my neighbors, and a the neighbors 5 and 7 year old over, and the dog was great, never met them before, and the dog just laid on it's back and the kids just rubbed its stomach for a while, then the dog got up and licked and licked some more. And that was that.

Though I have had dogs come up to me before while trimming, and I just held it full throttle and they kept their distance, then I threw it in the truck and got in and left. So big deal.