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White Gardens
09-08-2010, 09:39 PM
I'd never thought that I could ever look at a landscape and have not a clue as to what to do, regardless how good or bad I am.

It's happened to me twice now in the last week. I think I'll look at the photos and work through my design program to get past it.

Has anyone had this issue before? Hopefully it's just a little phase.

AGLA
09-08-2010, 09:43 PM
When my father was training me in on-site landscape design he used to tell me to just do something to get started. If you just start the design with a throw away idea, you will get something going that will inspire you into the right direction. Then you simply revise the crap that you started with. It works every time.

44DCNF
09-08-2010, 11:01 PM
This may not be the kind of idea you're looking for, but have you ever tried fasting? A water fast will slow or stop your digestion process depending on how long you fast. That allows more blood flow to the brain that would have otherwise been used for digestion, enabling more creative thinking and mental clarity. Might be worth a try.

White Gardens
09-09-2010, 08:01 AM
When my father was training me in on-site landscape design he used to tell me to just do something to get started. If you just start the design with a throw away idea, you will get something going that will inspire you into the right direction. Then you simply revise the crap that you started with. It works every time.

I should be able to get through it that way. I love the image editor program I have just for that reason.

This may not be the kind of idea you're looking for, but have you ever tried fasting? A water fast will slow or stop your digestion process depending on how long you fast. That allows more blood flow to the brain that would have otherwise been used for digestion, enabling more creative thinking and mental clarity. Might be worth a try.

No thank you. :laugh: Got to stay hydrated when working in general. As AGLA said I can work through it just by slapping a few quick designs together and revising them.

It's just weird over-all. I've heard of creative blocks, but never really experienced one until now. Normally I look at stuff and images pop into my head and it just wasn't happening.

stuvecorp
09-09-2010, 12:53 PM
I do sometimes. Some places after they tell me their budget it really blocks the design process. :) I went out to one this spring and I just couldn't put anything together.

44DCNF
09-09-2010, 02:58 PM
That's fine, it's not for everybody, but I don't want you to misunderstand me. I had in mind a water fast in which that is all you take in...plenty of water/no food. I didn't mean fasting from water. I've done many short fasts up to seven days and have never become dehydrated during one, or felt so weak I couldn't work. It does boost brain power and that is why I thought it would help.

You'll get it sorted out. It''ll likely be when you're thinking about something altogether different, an idea will come.

AGLA
09-10-2010, 07:21 AM
I'm waiting for someone to say "smoke a coupe of bones" or "drop a hit of acid".

Seriously, designing on an image is very limited because it is 100% from one perspective. While you work in a plan view you can still look at your site photos and also develop the third dimension as you layout the plan view.

There can be so much more to a landscape design than how the plants play off of each other and the house. When you work in a media that only allows the manipulation of a limited amount of elements, you digress into only using those elements. There are so many other elements or tools to work with in a landscape, not to say that you have to use them all, but it is like having one hand tied behind your back.

Part of having a creative block is because you are forced to using only those limited design elements that work in a photo. You most likely ran into a situation where just using only those limited elements was not enough to overcome the challenges of the site.

PaperCutter
09-10-2010, 08:29 AM
That's why I start most of my designs on the drafting table, working on trace over a printed basemap. If I'm stumped I just start drawing lines off the house corners. It helps to start defining spaces and relationships, and it also gets my through the "oh god, a blank page!" problem.

White Gardens
09-10-2010, 09:09 AM
I do sometimes. Some places after they tell me their budget it really blocks the design process. :) I went out to one this spring and I just couldn't put anything together.

That was one of the issues.

I'm waiting for someone to say "smoke a coupe of bones" or "drop a hit of acid".

Seriously, designing on an image is very limited because it is 100% from one perspective. While you work in a plan view you can still look at your site photos and also develop the third dimension as you layout the plan view.

There can be so much more to a landscape design than how the plants play off of each other and the house. When you work in a media that only allows the manipulation of a limited amount of elements, you digress into only using those elements. There are so many other elements or tools to work with in a landscape, not to say that you have to use them all, but it is like having one hand tied behind your back.

Part of having a creative block is because you are forced to using only those limited design elements that work in a photo. You most likely ran into a situation where just using only those limited elements was not enough to overcome the challenges of the site.

The challenges were in the fact that they put in a hot tub, on a raised wooden platform, close to the cap for the septic tank, next to a garage where all the shallow utilities run to the house.

The issue was that they want a wall, next to the septic tank, but not too close to the hot tub. That was going to cause some issues.

With money in mind I went blank standing on-site looking at it. I just couldn't move anything in my head.

I took the initiative in my initial design photo, and just moved the the hot-tub out of the way, laid out a patio, re-set the hot-tub out of the way off all the obstacles and went from there. I gave them the design photo and they loved it, but of course it was going to blow the minimal budget they are working with.

Even from what they were asking me to do without getting elaborate, their budget wasn't going to get half of what they were initially asking.

199044

AGLA
09-10-2010, 05:57 PM
I think that you did the right thing. You showed them what they could have without being unrealistic. That either will get them to find a way to pay for it, or it forces THEM to reduce the project to make it fit their budget. More often than not, people will make the effort to get what they want. They might need to put it off for a while to save up the dough, but I think they'll move in the right direction.

Design is a sales tool. It is a lot easier to want something enough to pay for it if you see the value in it.

robtown
09-12-2010, 11:44 AM
from the rendering you look stuck. I have seen pics of your other work and this looks boring and poorly laid out in comparison.
I am not trying to offend you.
I wish there was a pic of the whole backyard.
I dont like the idea of wasting a patio for a hot tub.
You have to down the stairs to get to the patio than up stairs to get in. bahaa
Can you move the hot tub to the deck and frame around it so it is sunk in the deck?
I am not sure where the septic is but is there room to do a raised patio around the hot tub.
Dump the limestone wall and do a bench wall or a planter box wall with seating on the patio side. I dont know how close the neighbors are but it will lend itself to some privacy.
As for money, do the design you want without the consideration of money. If they feel it is something they really want or need they will find a way. If they cant and they are to poor for a decent project do you really want to put your name on something that will look hack?
Good luck
hope this helped

White Gardens
09-12-2010, 05:09 PM
from the rendering you look stuck. I have seen pics of your other work and this looks boring and poorly laid out in comparison.
I am not trying to offend you.
I wish there was a pic of the whole backyard.
I dont like the idea of wasting a patio for a hot tub.
You have to down the stairs to get to the patio than up stairs to get in. bahaa
Can you move the hot tub to the deck and frame around it so it is sunk in the deck?
I am not sure where the septic is but is there room to do a raised patio around the hot tub.
Dump the limestone wall and do a bench wall or a planter box wall with seating on the patio side. I dont know how close the neighbors are but it will lend itself to some privacy.
As for money, do the design you want without the consideration of money. If they feel it is something they really want or need they will find a way. If they cant and they are to poor for a decent project do you really want to put your name on something that will look hack?
Good luck
hope this helped

No fense taken. And Thanks for ultimately thinking I do good work.

It is boring, and I did take other photos of the area, but they didn't come out because of the sunlight. If the HO wanted to more views, then I would have gone back out there on a better cloudy day to get better shots. So ultimately I was in a rush, as they were in a rush, to put something together for them.

I could have done a better job on the rendering, but I only put so much effort into what the budget is allowing. I could have spent way more time adjusting perspectives and such to make it look cleaner, and add tall upright yews for privacy in the foreground in the view.

Ultimately, the HO was happy that I could put everything into perspective for her, so no new views were needed.

The limestone would be cut out of the equation, as for budget reasons. It's not that much more expensive than standard SRW block, but I mortar my limestone walls and that is more labor intensive, so it's more expensive.

Sure, the patio would be wasted by the hot tub, but to do a walk way around it wouldn't have worked. The HO placed the deck on those 12 x 12 decking pads and set them in sand. Eventually the whole thing is going to shift, and I don't want a void under that deck holding water in the winter.

A patio would serve the purpose, and give them an actual patio someday to use if the hot tub ever left.

Also there is a door to the basement in the right side of the image. She only wanted stairs put in to see what it would look like if they decided to do it.

robtown
09-12-2010, 06:49 PM
I hate budgets ...they ruin perfectly good landscapes.
I hate rushing my work even more...
Seems like there was alot going on this project as far as what could be done.
good luck
Hope it all works out.

FinerCutslawnCare
09-18-2010, 11:03 AM
That was one of the issues.



The challenges were in the fact that they put in a hot tub, on a raised wooden platform, close to the cap for the septic tank, next to a garage where all the shallow utilities run to the house.

The issue was that they want a wall, next to the septic tank, but not too close to the hot tub. That was going to cause some issues.

With money in mind I went blank standing on-site looking at it. I just couldn't move anything in my head.

I took the initiative in my initial design photo, and just moved the the hot-tub out of the way, laid out a patio, re-set the hot-tub out of the way off all the obstacles and went from there. I gave them the design photo and they loved it, but of course it was going to blow the minimal budget they are working with.

Even from what they were asking me to do without getting elaborate, their budget wasn't going to get half of what they were initially asking.

199044

What program is that that you are using White Gardens? Very neat!

White Gardens
09-19-2010, 08:02 PM
What program is that that you are using White Gardens? Very neat!

Pro Landscape Image Editor. I like it a lot.

http://www.lawnsite.com/showthread.php?t=77756

Or you can check out my photo albums with other design images on my FB page linked in my sig.