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View Full Version : Power equipment stores...WTF!


Surferbum21
09-26-2010, 10:50 PM
Does anyone else have this problem with their local PE stores? All 3 of my trimmers decided to take a dive on one day. 2 were getting old but thought wed make it to the end of the season sale. No time to fix while out in the field so I made calls to 3 freaking stores and not one had any shindawai trimmers in stock nor the parts I needed. How the hell do you run a business like this? I was able to borrow one from a friend who does landscape so thank goodness for that.

I know other companies are competition but I highly advise befriending at least 1 or 2. I've loaned equipment out with the favor returned right back...

rwaters
09-26-2010, 11:29 PM
were they dropping Shindawa? I know some distributors require you to have echo now as well to get Shindawa, so that could be why they are out. I can see being out of some parts but trimmers at this time of year that is kinda odd.

Keith
09-27-2010, 01:06 AM
That was the story with Shindaiwa around here for years. Dealers would have them, then ditch them, then sometime end up back with the line again. They rarely ever stocked them, or parts for them. Shindaiwa bitched about online sales, but for a lot of people like me, that was the only way I could ever own them.

But when 3 quit in one day, there isn't much you can do.

kilgoja
09-27-2010, 01:13 AM
sounds like time to switch brands...try husqvarna or honda lol

BrunoT
09-27-2010, 01:56 AM
Does anyone else have this problem with their local PE stores? All 3 of my trimmers decided to take a dive on one day. 2 were getting old but thought wed make it to the end of the season sale. No time to fix while out in the field so I made calls to 3 freaking stores and not one had any shindawai trimmers in stock nor the parts I needed. How the hell do you run a business like this? I was able to borrow one from a friend who does landscape so thank goodness for that.

I know other companies are competition but I highly advise befriending at least 1 or 2. I've loaned equipment out with the favor returned right back...

You're not alone. I went to buy a 21" mower last fall of a certain brand. The dealer closest to me carried their line as his main brand. He had zero of them in stock. Zero as demos. Zero brochures on them. Zero of ANY 21" mower of that brand. And only ONE 21" commercial mower in the entire store. But I of course was welcome to order one, sight unseen, if I wanted, for about $1400.

I also wanted to buy a grass/leaf collection system. Same story. No way to test one out, you pretty much had to just hope for the best. I had to risk about $1700 on that. Decided I wasn't up to eating the cost if it sucked (or rather didn't)

They did have a stand on there. But not in the deck size I needed. And no plans to bring one in. "not a popular size" I was informed. But I was welcome to drop about $6500 on the chance it actually worked well. I wondered to myself how they'd know it wasn't popular if nobody could see one or demo one while they were welcome to try out another size.

Meanwhile in all of this, zero offer to set up demos of anything with their regional reps. But I was free to call the manufacturer direct if I wanted and see if they would drive something out.

Drove by there last month. They've gone out of business. Apparently others were not into buying sight-unseen either.

You're either in business or you're not. If you don't stock equipment you want to sell, or at least have enough mowers to demonstrate to prospective customers, you won't sell very many. Yes, it adds to costs. But I doubt BMW or Chevrolet would sell many cars if nobody could test drive them or even look at them first.

Merkava_4
09-27-2010, 08:59 AM
There's a store in town called Jensen & Watts. A real nice large show room with waxed vinyl composition tile floor. The place is almost always empty with maybe 1 or 2 commercial Honda 21" mowers and 1 or 2 edgers. They got enough room on the floor to easily stock 200 commercial Hondas if they wanted.

punt66
09-27-2010, 09:04 AM
There's a store in town called Jensen & Watts. A real nice large show room with waxed vinyl composition tile floor. The place is almost always empty with maybe 1 or 2 commercial Honda 21" mowers and 1 or 2 edgers. They got enough room on the floor to easily stock 200 commercial Hondas if they wanted.

they have to buy them. If they dont have the money..

MOHUSTLER
09-27-2010, 09:53 AM
As far as shindy goes, we loved the product, and our distubritor was only 60 miles away from us. So if we needed parts they were here next day and if need be we could drive to them and pick stuff up.

Now with echo being in the mix, most product lines have been discontuined, or altered to where customers are looking elsewhere. We have switched almost all our customers over to redmax. And id say 99% of them are happy with the switch.

mowerbrad
09-27-2010, 10:13 AM
I am very thankful that I now go to the dealer I do. If I had a trimmer breakdown, I could easily get the parts I need, if not I could for sure just buy a new one and be back working in no time.

I've dealt with dealers with very poor service. Never again will I do that.

ucfbrian
09-27-2010, 11:10 AM
As an OPE dealer, it is hard to always carry in stock what the customer is needing. Your best time to find what you want and have the best chance for the dealer to have it in stock is the spring time. That is when the new models have just come out and the dealers are trying to have everything in stock for the lawn guys. There is nothing like starting the season off and having something break and than the dealer not having a replacement in stock. Right now, I am trying to sell off most of my remaining inventory off so I can order and have in stock all of the new models in the spring, but I am also keeping some inventory in stock so I have something to sell. As a dealer, one thing you have to be concerned with in the fall is your year end inventory tax. We have to pay tax on all of our inventory that we have in stock.

One great thing that I can tell you about Husqvarna on the dealer side as compared to some of the other brands out there, is that they give me 12 months to sell my inventory before I have to pay for it. I tend to keep more in stock because I have longer to sell it before I have to come off of my cash. A lot of other brands out there only give the dealers between 120 and 270 days depending on when they order and how much they order. That will make me able to keep more inventory in stock in the slow season because I know I will have the first part of the season to sell it before it comes due for payment.

Unless a dealer is selling a lot of collection units and the units fit multiple models, you will rarely see any dealer keeping them in stock due to the fact they are $1700+. What if the dealer did keep them in stock, sold his last model in stock that it fit, and than the manfacturer discontinued the mower and he was stuck with the collection system. Next time, ask your dealer how many obselete parts and accessories he has in stock and you can see why we are hesitant to keep many big expensive parts in stock.

rwaters
09-27-2010, 11:26 AM
You're not alone. I went to buy a 21" mower last fall of a certain brand. The dealer closest to me carried their line as his main brand. He had zero of them in stock. Zero as demos. Zero brochures on them. Zero of ANY 21" mower of that brand. And only ONE 21" commercial mower in the entire store. But I of course was welcome to order one, sight unseen, if I wanted, for about $1400.

I also wanted to buy a grass/leaf collection system. Same story. No way to test one out, you pretty much had to just hope for the best. I had to risk about $1700 on that. Decided I wasn't up to eating the cost if it sucked (or rather didn't)

They did have a stand on there. But not in the deck size I needed. And no plans to bring one in. "not a popular size" I was informed. But I was welcome to drop about $6500 on the chance it actually worked well. I wondered to myself how they'd know it wasn't popular if nobody could see one or demo one while they were welcome to try out another size.

Meanwhile in all of this, zero offer to set up demos of anything with their regional reps. But I was free to call the manufacturer direct if I wanted and see if they would drive something out.

Drove by there last month. They've gone out of business. Apparently others were not into buying sight-unseen either.

You're either in business or you're not. If you don't stock equipment you want to sell, or at least have enough mowers to demonstrate to prospective customers, you won't sell very many. Yes, it adds to costs. But I doubt BMW or Chevrolet would sell many cars if nobody could test drive them or even look at them first.


Well I am in that boat as their is no way I am bringing in a $1400 21" push mower(honestly how often do you expect most dealers to sell that). Hell my distributor does not even stock them so no way of getting a demo either(I asked just so I know). The stand ons I have tried selling them in the past with no luck so do not have them either(but also do not have a brand with them right now) I also used to have a bagger around that I have acquired until someone act liked it*lol* Some of this stuff in certain areas just does not sell often. I do not know of a single dealer in my area with a stand on, or a grass collector(other then walker) in stock. I do the best I can to have demos as to what most of my customers want, but unlike cars that people buy after they try it out mowers everyone wants at demo pricing after they cut grass. So for Dealers to have a hundred demos for you to try expect prices to go way up so we can profit enough to pay for them.

rwaters
09-27-2010, 11:27 AM
As far as shindy goes, we loved the product, and our distubritor was only 60 miles away from us. So if we needed parts they were here next day and if need be we could drive to them and pick stuff up.

Now with echo being in the mix, most product lines have been discontuined, or altered to where customers are looking elsewhere. We have switched almost all our customers over to redmax. And id say 99% of them are happy with the switch.

I wonder how long they will keep shindy as its own line myself, with them killing the offerings it is no longer viable as a lineup by itself.

hackitdown
09-27-2010, 11:42 AM
It is really up to the manufacturers to make sure that demos are available. The regional rep should be able to arrange to bring a demo for a qualified customer...if they can't get there with a machine to try out, then no one will buy one. Pretty simple.

Dealers, manufacturers, and distributors wonder why we don't but from them, why we only buy "what everyone else has", why we will pay more for "just a brand name" with fewer features. I bought Exmarks because they gave me a 2 day demo, and I liked the machine. Loads of people have Exmarks around here, and parts are available at 3 dealers, and online. I bought a Gravely because the dealer had one on the floor, and I tried it out on a lawn.

I didn't buy a Scag because the local dealer wouldn't or couldn't arrange a demo.

I buy Stihl because I like the machines, but also because of dealer support and parts. My dealer has every new machine ready to go if I need to buy one. Gas it up, and pull the string...sold.

mowerbrad
09-27-2010, 12:51 PM
You're not alone. I went to buy a 21" mower last fall of a certain brand. The dealer closest to me carried their line as his main brand. He had zero of them in stock. Zero as demos. Zero brochures on them. Zero of ANY 21" mower of that brand. And only ONE 21" commercial mower in the entire store. But I of course was welcome to order one, sight unseen, if I wanted, for about $1400.

I also wanted to buy a grass/leaf collection system. Same story. No way to test one out, you pretty much had to just hope for the best. I had to risk about $1700 on that. Decided I wasn't up to eating the cost if it sucked (or rather didn't)

They did have a stand on there. But not in the deck size I needed. And no plans to bring one in. "not a popular size" I was informed. But I was welcome to drop about $6500 on the chance it actually worked well. I wondered to myself how they'd know it wasn't popular if nobody could see one or demo one while they were welcome to try out another size.

Meanwhile in all of this, zero offer to set up demos of anything with their regional reps. But I was free to call the manufacturer direct if I wanted and see if they would drive something out.

Drove by there last month. They've gone out of business. Apparently others were not into buying sight-unseen either.

You're either in business or you're not. If you don't stock equipment you want to sell, or at least have enough mowers to demonstrate to prospective customers, you won't sell very many. Yes, it adds to costs. But I doubt BMW or Chevrolet would sell many cars if nobody could test drive them or even look at them first.


There aren't always demo's available in what you want. Typically dealers have to get demo units from their reps, and the reps may only have a certain machines for demo. They aren't going to offer one of everything as a demo. Usually they will have one size ztr available for demo, one size stand-on mower and one size walk-behind. I have never heard of a demo 21" mower.

Some dealers will buy their own mowers to use as demo/loaner mowers, but usually only larger dealers will own their own mowers.

When I demo mowers, I don't usually get the EXACT mower I'd be looking at, but something similar. For instance, I buy 52"/54" size mowers, but the usually demo mowers that I've had were 60" decks, bigger than what I would actually buy.

Roger
09-27-2010, 12:59 PM
Any dealer buying equipment or parts for inventory is money spent, and not working for them. Why do you think JIT procedures got started? It is the same thing.

As the pinch gets deeper and deeper, the likelihood of finding either equipment or parts will diminish. Some on this thread have already found that to be true. Don't look for things to change soon. Some people expect Sept 2010 to be just like Aug 2008. No, not going to be, and plenty of reasons for it not to be the same.

To extend the thoughts on the topic, I have been convinced for a few years that the business model for OPE and parts will change. Technology has enabled some changes already, the economy is dictating other changes. The point is not to expect responses and availability now, and in the future, as it was a couple of years ago. Somebody asked the question above, "Is that any way to run a business?" Good question. But, the answer is hinged on being sustainable. If a dealer cannot sustain former practices, then changes will happen (as many have learned). If no changes, then the outcome is more significant. Look to the auto industry business models for some guidance.

K/B
09-27-2010, 01:11 PM
I wonder how long they will keep shindy as its own line myself, with them killing the offerings it is no longer viable as a lineup by itself.

The only thing they've killed is the chainsaws. :confused: Which were only a tiny part of Shindaiwa's offering.

knox gsl
09-27-2010, 01:29 PM
As an OPE dealer, it is hard to always carry in stock what the customer is needing. Your best time to find what you want and have the best chance for the dealer to have it in stock is the spring time. That is when the new models have just come out and the dealers are trying to have everything in stock for the lawn guys. There is nothing like starting the season off and having something break and than the dealer not having a replacement in stock. Right now, I am trying to sell off most of my remaining inventory off so I can order and have in stock all of the new models in the spring, but I am also keeping some inventory in stock so I have something to sell. As a dealer, one thing you have to be concerned with in the fall is your year end inventory tax. We have to pay tax on all of our inventory that we have in stock.

One great thing that I can tell you about Husqvarna on the dealer side as compared to some of the other brands out there, is that they give me 12 months to sell my inventory before I have to pay for it. I tend to keep more in stock because I have longer to sell it before I have to come off of my cash. A lot of other brands out there only give the dealers between 120 and 270 days depending on when they order and how much they order. That will make me able to keep more inventory in stock in the slow season because I know I will have the first part of the season to sell it before it comes due for payment.

Unless a dealer is selling a lot of collection units and the units fit multiple models, you will rarely see any dealer keeping them in stock due to the fact they are $1700+. What if the dealer did keep them in stock, sold his last model in stock that it fit, and than the manfacturer discontinued the mower and he was stuck with the collection system. Next time, ask your dealer how many obselete parts and accessories he has in stock and you can see why we are hesitant to keep many big expensive parts in stock.

This is basicly what I was thinking as I started to read this thread. It is a hard choice the dealer has to make based on the season, brand support, and tax structure. Would you really think it would be wise for a dealer to have a showroom full of 2010 mowers right now at the end of mowing season to have to pay tax on and sell at a discount next spring when the product line changes and he has all these "old machines" sitting around . I would be willing to say any good dealer would be able to get parts overnight or have the machine that you need within a reasonable time frame. The dealer I buy most of my stuff from always has pleanty of stock year round, but it changes by the season, they have plenty of blowers, vacuums and leaf loaders on the floor, but why would they be stocked up on mowers now?

ucfbrian
09-27-2010, 02:03 PM
It is really up to the manufacturers to make sure that demos are available. The regional rep should be able to arrange to bring a demo for a qualified customer...if they can't get there with a machine to try out, then no one will buy one. Pretty simple.

Dealers, manufacturers, and distributors wonder why we don't but from them, why we only buy "what everyone else has", why we will pay more for "just a brand name" with fewer features. I bought Exmarks because they gave me a 2 day demo, and I liked the machine. Loads of people have Exmarks around here, and parts are available at 3 dealers, and online. I bought a Gravely because the dealer had one on the floor, and I tried it out on a lawn.

I didn't buy a Scag because the local dealer wouldn't or couldn't arrange a demo.

I buy Stihl because I like the machines, but also because of dealer support and parts. My dealer has every new machine ready to go if I need to buy one. Gas it up, and pull the string...sold.

Most, if not all, manfacturers do have reps with multiple machines in their demo fleet. Yes, demos do help them sell machines but you have to remember that the demos also cost them money. Are you going to want to pay retail for a demo machine? No way, the manfacturer is going to have to dump the machine when they are done with it for their actual cost, so thereotically they have not lost a dime yet. But, the sales rep has to go around demoing the machine, they have to carry extra insurance on the machine since it is a demo, gas for the machine, maintance, wear and tear damage, blades, etc, etc.

Most people look at it like it is one demo machine, but when a manfacturer brings out a new model and puts it into demo fleets, every rep gets one. Every rep is not just going to have one demo machine, they are going to have at least 2 or 3. Depending on the company, there can be 2 or more reps per state, in Florida we have 3 reps for Husqvarna, and of course there are 50 states, and almost all manfacturers are in all the states. So we have on average 2.5 machines per rep, say 2.5 reps per state, and 50 states. That puts up at 300+ demo machines at any give time at an average of say $6000 cost per machine and you are looking at millions of dollars in demo machines plus countless more millions of dollars to demo them to you.

Most manfacturers do let the dealers get a certain number of demo/loaner machines per year based on volume or order size. But on average, that only saves the dealer about $600 per machine to let the customer take it and demo it and than come back and buy a new one. Yes, we do make money selling machines, but what kind of discount would you want on the demo machine. I can bet you are going to want a lot more than $600 off on the demo. As a dealer, I am carrying at least $2,000,000 in liability insurance on any product that I am going to let go out on demo and making you sign a waiver of liability. I personally only keep 1 demo at a time in stock, it is always the newest model 52/54" zero turn, and I keep it 3 to 6 months and than sell it.

ucfbrian
09-27-2010, 02:09 PM
This is basicly what I was thinking as I started to read this thread. It is a hard choice the dealer has to make based on the season, brand support, and tax structure. Would you really think it would be wise for a dealer to have a showroom full of 2010 mowers right now at the end of mowing season to have to pay tax on and sell at a discount next spring when the product line changes and he has all these "old machines" sitting around . I would be willing to say any good dealer would be able to get parts overnight or have the machine that you need within a reasonable time frame. The dealer I buy most of my stuff from always has pleanty of stock year round, but it changes by the season, they have plenty of blowers, vacuums and leaf loaders on the floor, but why would they be stocked up on mowers now?

A smart dealer is going to know what parts he goes through the most and try to keep them in stock. For the rest of the parts, overnight is always an option but it does cost extra $$$. The only way I am buying 2010 machines right now is if I can buy them discounted from what the 2011 machines are going to cost me. Here in Florida the weather can make it hard to judge when to stop ordering. It has not been raining much around me or the lawn guys would still be out mowing every week.

Roger
09-27-2010, 02:20 PM
A smart dealer is going to know what parts he goes through the most and try to keep them in stock. For the rest of the parts, overnight is always an option but it does cost extra $$$. ....

To the first part of your post, it appears the smart dealers are thinning down on any inventory, including parts. A couple of years ago, this may have been the case, but not now. To the second part, any part I've bought from a dealer that was not in stock, I'm paying S & H costs. When the cost is passed along to the customers, there isn't much incentive for them to carry a large inventory, rather "we will have that part in two days,..." The cost is just tacked on to the product cost.

This is a catch-22 situation. As much as I would like to support the local dealer, if I am going to pay for S & H, I just as well order online. I will get the part, often faster than through dealer channels. It saves me travel and time of having to go to the dealer. The unfortunate thing is that as this happens more and more, the dealer has less reason to carry inventory, leaving me without a local supplier anyway. As dealer inventory dwindles, the reason to return to the dealer for parts is less and less. This is why my previous comments about business models changing.

mowerbrad
09-27-2010, 03:15 PM
This is a catch-22 situation. As much as I would like to support the local dealer, if I am going to pay for S & H, I just as well order online. I will get the part, often faster than through dealer channels. It saves me travel and time of having to go to the dealer. The unfortunate thing is that as this happens more and more, the dealer has less reason to carry inventory, leaving me without a local supplier anyway. As dealer inventory dwindles, the reason to return to the dealer for parts is less and less. This is why my previous comments about business models changing.

With one of my previous mowers (bob-cat) my local dealer didn't want anything to do with getting me parts or repairing my mower. So I was forced to buy online and from dealers half-way across the state. Paying the shipping costs started to get expensive, especially when I had to get my parts in mulitple orders. I absolutely hate ordering online or over the phone...I'm always worried about getting the wrong part.

With my current dealer, they do stock a very large amount of parts/supplies. If they don't have the part, they can check with one of their other 9 stores. If for some reason they don't have the part at all, they can order the part for me and have it in (guaranteed) in 2-3 days. For $10 more, I can have the part(s) overnighted.

I will continue to support my dealer by buying my parts from them. But they have always been good to me and I know if I have a problem, they will be right there to fix it for me.

ucfbrian
09-27-2010, 03:34 PM
To the first part of your post, it appears the smart dealers are thinning down on any inventory, including parts. A couple of years ago, this may have been the case, but not now. To the second part, any part I've bought from a dealer that was not in stock, I'm paying S & H costs. When the cost is passed along to the customers, there isn't much incentive for them to carry a large inventory, rather "we will have that part in two days,..." The cost is just tacked on to the product cost.

This is a catch-22 situation. As much as I would like to support the local dealer, if I am going to pay for S & H, I just as well order online. I will get the part, often faster than through dealer channels. It saves me travel and time of having to go to the dealer. The unfortunate thing is that as this happens more and more, the dealer has less reason to carry inventory, leaving me without a local supplier anyway. As dealer inventory dwindles, the reason to return to the dealer for parts is less and less. This is why my previous comments about business models changing.

A smart dealer thinning down his inventory is going to start carrying 2 of an item instead of 6, maybe only carry 10 sets of blades for one particular mower instead of 40. He wont carry as many of one part, but parts that sell he will not get rid of all together. Alot of what everybody out there is seeing is dealers that have overextended their credit lines and bought too many toys when the going was good and can no longer afford to keep parts in stock.

You are right, it is a catch-22 but it is both ways. I have minimums that I have to meet on parts orders to get special parts pricing, free shipping, etc. If I do not have enough people coming in and ordering parts, I am not meeting those minimums and am having to pass all of the shipping cost along. The more that you order online, the more you will see dealers start to close their doors and than you will not have anyone local to go to in an emergency. Also, back in 2008 when we were getting retail on machines, we were making a lot more money to be able to put a lot more parts in stock to keep for when you needed it. How many people in the last year have paid close to retail on a new machine? How many people are not afraid to ask the dealer "Is that the best that you can do" when we have already taken $500-1000 off of retail already?

mbrew
09-27-2010, 04:16 PM
A smart dealer thinning down his inventory is going to start carrying 2 of an item instead of 6, maybe only carry 10 sets of blades for one particular mower instead of 40. He wont carry as many of one part, but parts that sell he will not get rid of all together. Alot of what everybody out there is seeing is dealers that have overextended their credit lines and bought too many toys when the going was good and can no longer afford to keep parts in stock.

You are right, it is a catch-22 but it is both ways. I have minimums that I have to meet on parts orders to get special parts pricing, free shipping, etc. If I do not have enough people coming in and ordering parts, I am not meeting those minimums and am having to pass all of the shipping cost along. The more that you order online, the more you will see dealers start to close their doors and than you will not have anyone local to go to in an emergency. Also, back in 2008 when we were getting retail on machines, we were making a lot more money to be able to put a lot more parts in stock to keep for when you needed it. How many people in the last year have paid close to retail on a new machine? How many people are not afraid to ask the dealer "Is that the best that you can do" when we have already taken $500-1000 off of retail already?

I can't count on the dealers around me for emergency anything other than maybe a spark plug, so what you're describing is already happened. I also have two of the largest internet sellers of parts within driving distance of me. Recently I was in a bad way and would have driven an hour to either one of them. Even they are getting parts drop shipped from a variety of places. I don't count on dealers for anything. That includes cars, motorcycles, boats and power equipment.

pugs
09-27-2010, 04:35 PM
A smart dealer thinning down his inventory is going to start carrying 2 of an item instead of 6, maybe only carry 10 sets of blades for one particular mower instead of 40. He wont carry as many of one part, but parts that sell he will not get rid of all together. Alot of what everybody out there is seeing is dealers that have overextended their credit lines and bought too many toys when the going was good and can no longer afford to keep parts in stock.

You are right, it is a catch-22 but it is both ways. I have minimums that I have to meet on parts orders to get special parts pricing, free shipping, etc. If I do not have enough people coming in and ordering parts, I am not meeting those minimums and am having to pass all of the shipping cost along. The more that you order online, the more you will see dealers start to close their doors and than you will not have anyone local to go to in an emergency. Also, back in 2008 when we were getting retail on machines, we were making a lot more money to be able to put a lot more parts in stock to keep for when you needed it. How many people in the last year have paid close to retail on a new machine? How many people are not afraid to ask the dealer "Is that the best that you can do" when we have already taken $500-1000 off of retail already?

Apparently I missed 2008. Never heard of anyone selling a machine for retail. Would be nice to just look up retail in the list and give that out....but around here that would cause lots of laughing now, then and anytime in the past.

Rayner Lawncare
09-27-2010, 07:20 PM
Try o'connors by quail springs mall. They aren't perfect but they are the best I've found so far. Good luck.:drinkup:

oldclawn
09-27-2010, 07:33 PM
Every know it all on this site would sing a different tune about dealers if they ever had a chance to "walk in the dealers" shoes for 5 or 6 months! There are dealers on here that would certainly agree that from the comments most of you make, you do not have a clue at what a THANKLESS JOB being a dealership is, have no concept of the costs and agonies of retailing.
I say, to those of you who complain the most--see first that you deserve to be a customer!

Alan0354
09-27-2010, 08:50 PM
Every know it all on this site would sing a different tune about dealers if they ever had a chance to "walk in the dealers" shoes for 5 or 6 months! There are dealers on here that would certainly agree that from the comments most of you make, you do not have a clue at what a THANKLESS JOB being a dealership is, have no concept of the costs and agonies of retailing.
I say, to those of you who complain the most--see first that you deserve to be a customer!

That's why a lot of the customers "fired" themselves as a customer and go online. With attitute like this, no wonder people are leaving dealers.

We are consummers, we are not here to be "understandable" to the dealer and we don't want to walk in the dealer's shoe because we choose not to be a dealer!!! AND more and more people chose to walk and start buying online because of price and less headack!!!