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View Full Version : Thinking about buying a L or LN 8000 Ford


Gravel Rat
08-18-2002, 01:07 PM
Well I have been thinking about it and I was gonna buy a tandem or a F-350 and now my old man thinks I should buy a single axle 5 ton.

The truck I'am looking for will be a L-8000 12+23 axles 8v71 power and a Roadranger transmission if I get a truck with a wheelbase close to my 450 I still can get into the same places with a bigger truck. The 450 is good but a guy can't carry enough material on the truck because people usually want 3 yards and thats 9000 lbs on a 1.5 ton truck which is too heavy.

I'am not worried that this truck is over CDL because I'am already a commercial driver.

Have any of you guys driven a L-8000 Ford single axle and what are they like ? I have driven L-9000 tandems seemed tobe fine a bit rough rider.

I figure I should get more work with this truck because I can get into places where a tandem can't go or where people people only want 1 to 6 yards of material.

What do ya think my F-450 might be gone (Sold) next week so its time to look for a replacement truck.

thelawnguy
08-18-2002, 07:46 PM
I drive a 1989 L8000 with the Ford diesel (210 hp) and 5x2 transmission.

IMO the truck is woefully underpowered and/or undergeared for its weight capacity (44,000 lbs).

For a little more money I'm sure that there are better choices.

Randy J
08-19-2002, 11:40 AM
Buy a Dodge!!!

I would actually consider an equivilent size International with the the T446 engine.
Randy

Gravel Rat
08-19-2002, 08:46 PM
I though about International but the 466 doesn't have a JAKE brake available and thats needed on a truck with a 35,000 pounds gross. I would like to find a L or LN 8000 with either 290/300 Cummins power (10L engine) or a 8v71 Detroit (568 Cid) because both of these engines have JAKE heads available. I have found a International 2574 with 6v92 power 13sp Road ranger with 35,000lb gvw but from the picture it looks like shes got some cab rust.

What I'am after is a short truck that can haul more weight than my 450 and still beable to get into the places the 450 will go its just not economical to run a 450 for the jobs I get. The Louisville Fords seem to make the best single axle dumps because they have the high cab (good visability) and parts are easy to get.

I will just have to keep searching its gonna be hard to find one without the rotten Cat and 5+2 transmission.

southside
08-20-2002, 09:03 AM
Most of the LNT 8000 series had the V8 Cat motors. If you're
looking for something without those horrible 5x2 gearboxes then
you may have to look at a tandem. Over here the LNT 8000 in a
tandem is very common. Usually have the hopeless 3208 Cat
motor,but they make up for it by having a 13 speed roadranger
as standard.
If you really must have a jake brake then you may have to get
a LNT 9000 instead. Standard setup here for those is a Cummins
V903 @ 300hp with 15 speed roadranger.

Gravel Rat
08-20-2002, 11:46 AM
What I may do it find a L-9000 tandem with a 300 Cummins and take the rear tandems off and shorten the frame and put a single axle in the back. I think its the only way to make a heavy duty single axle I really don't want a 5+2 and the Cat . Doing the project shouldn't cost that much just finding all the parts needed todo the project.

One of the local excavation contractor here used to have a L-8000 tandem with a 3208 and it was a dog the truck was way underpowered he sold the truck quickly it was more of a hazzard to the road.

southside
08-21-2002, 06:31 AM
Yeah, the V8 Cats were a bit ordinary. Have you considered going to a single drive cabover like an Isuzu or Mitsubishi? Very
tough and reliable.Heaps of power and quite comfortable.

lawnjob
10-10-2002, 09:11 PM
An older Mack R model 6 wheeler with the 250hp six and 5speed w/low hole is quite a stout truck. Dynatard is their version of Jake brake. Mack trannies and rears are nearly bulletproof.

gslam88
10-11-2002, 11:47 AM
I am a little confused; you say that you want either a L/LN8000 or a F-350. The class 8 ln8000 vs. class 3 pick up for possibly doing the same work Why limit yourself if you have to? You even know the weight problem

"The 450 is good but a guy can't carry enough material on the truck because people usually want 3 yards and thats 9000 lbs on a 1.5 ton truck which is too heavy. "

And around here DMV (dept of motor Vehicles) looks for those overweight trucks, and usually at about $1 a pound it can get expensive.

Depending on the body size, a 5-7 yard body is 10 feet and can hold just about 10 yards, good body size for larger residential work.

You also don't want a v8, stay a straight 6 and stay away from the 3208. not a good choice the 3406 is a much better motor, just not easy to find in the light class trucks.

Also some of the LN models do come with disc brakes, I would opt for air.

Have you looked into the Kenworth T300 some do come with a jake brake


As far as needing a jake brake, it might be nice but not always needed. I have an International 4900 w/466 34k gvw and no jake it does just find for hauls up to 10 yards of dirt. As far as getting into places just by sheer weight alone their are times that any truck loaded at 30k plus cant get where a pu can get. And for parts and dealer availability I have never had a problem with the International.

The other thing to consider is the lightweight of the truck vs. the gross weight. My international has a lightweight of 13k and a gross of 34K. I think that some of the fords are closer to 15K and still at 34k so you might just lose 2k or more depending on how it lays out. Just food for though and my opion



Not everone will agree with what I have said, but its what I believe and what I would do in your shoes in my opion.

:D

hosejockey2002
10-11-2002, 07:29 PM
Karl- here in the states the Izuzu trucks are common, but most are box trucks. Izuzu dump trucks are pretty rare. Do you guys think a 3208 cat might be adequate in a 5 yard with a Roadranger trans? I've never driven a real truck with a 3208, just buses with automatics. They are pretty slow when loaded, but smooth and very good on fuel. I used to drive a 10 yard KW with a 3406 425hp cat with a 15 speed RR and it hauled a**!

Gravel Rat
10-12-2002, 11:59 PM
Hi guys I have decided to stick with the F-Superduty I'am gonna shoot for more P+D work so I need a flatdeck but it will dump if I was going to haul nothing but dirt I would go for a 5 ton single axle dump. There isn't quite enough work for a single axle to keep the truck busy enough if I'am going to get into dirt hauling I will buy a tandem. With a tandem there is no limitations for the work there is always hauling jobs for a tandem dump there must be a reason why there is no single axle dump truck in this area only in the next community 40miles away.

The thing is if there no work for the truck I buy I want tobe able to use it as my daily driver and a 450 can be used as a daily driver if I buy a single axle dump it sits and I need another vehical to use as a daily driver.

Alan
10-13-2002, 09:34 AM
What is so terrible about 5+2 gearing? I grew up driving stuff set up that way and never thought it was too bad to live with. Tht setup gives you both a good creeper reverse for backing in around a jobsite and still gives you a decent reverse speed for when you need to back a long distance. Particularly in plowing operations that fast reverse is handy. Only real drawback I see is that the 5 speed is only a single countershaft design and won't handle the torque loads that the currently available engines can generate. There were lots of 5-7 yard dumps with that gearing and tehy seemed to do the job pretty darn good.

thelawnguy
10-14-2002, 12:21 AM
"Have you looked into the Kenworth T300 some do come with a jake brake"

You can put an exhaust brake on just about anything; its probably not needed as long as the truck is set up properly, unless you regularly drive near GVW in hilly areas.

I occasionally drive a 87 International S2600 with the big Cummins (260hp) and 7 speed Road ranger, light weight is 25k GVW is 54k, only time I even bother flipping on the Jake is when its loaded to capacity. I'm no expert but all it seems to do is make a lot of noise and attract DMV inspectors...

Gravel Rat
10-14-2002, 12:42 AM
If you don't have a JAKE on a gravel truck here you will be looking at replacing rear brakes every 6 months or less we have hills here in B.C. Canada they range from 4 to 10% grades. I know the drivers and O/Ops will not run or have a JAKE less dump truck its too damn dangerous without one.

You can have a truck without a JAKE but your working alot harder to control the truck you will be constantly downshifting and being really aware of how much brake pressure your using. You can smoke the brakes so easy and you will have a runnaway truck if you loose concentration just for a second.

Our tandem axle dumps are usually have 350-450hp 8-13-15 or 18 spd road rangers 18,000 and 44,000lbs axles gvw 62,000lbs carrying legal load of 30,000lbs.

A heavy single axle is 250-300hp 8-9 or 10spd 12,000 and 23,000lb axles 35,000lb gvw and carry legal load of 13,000lbs.

The DOT will never bother a driver here about using a JAKE because its more of a safety item its on the truck for a purpose.

Sorry for getting on my soap box but you guys that live where the land is as flat as a kitchen table have it easy driving truck but driving truck here can make your life flash in front of your eyes real quick. You make one mistake on the hills here you might aswell hope you survive the crash and wearing a good set of depends because your gonna s*** your pants.

hosejockey2002
10-14-2002, 10:48 AM
Most of the cities around here have ordinances prohibiting use of compression (jake) brakes withing their limits. Apparently most politicians beleive that jake brakes are nothing more than noisemakers to entertain the driver and irritate the citizens instead of critical safety devices. :dizzy:

southside
10-16-2002, 03:41 AM
Yes you can fit an exhaust brake to most trucks but they are not as effective as a jake brake or dynatard for that matter. Another option here which is starting to become popular is a Voith or Telma ******er. The work on the trucks driveshaft so they will slow the truck down even with the gearbox in neutral. And remember folks,you can never have too much power or too many gears. :)

gslam88
10-16-2002, 11:54 AM
Gravel Rat,

Now that we are off the subject since you have decided to not go with the 8000 I disagree with you on something.


"A heavy single axle is 250-300hp 8-9 or 10spd 12,000 and 23,000lb axles 35,000lb gvw and carry legal load of 13,000lbs"

My International 4900 Has a GVW of 34,000, but I have a legal weight of 21,000 because my light weight is 13,000. That is the nice thing about International, their lightweight is light and they are a heavy carrier.

What truck are you thinking of with a lightweight of 22,000?

LawnGuy

Found this for you on Jake brakes
Device used to assist brakes in slowing the vehicle. The most common type of ******er on over-the-road trucks manipulates the engine's valves to create engine drag. (This type is commonly referred to as "Jake Brake" because the predominant manufacturer is Jacobs Vehicle Equipment Co.) Other types of ******ers include exhaust ******ers, transmission-mounted hydraulic ******ers and axle-mounted electromagnetic ******ers.

There are certain items on heavy trucks you don't want to skimp on, and braking is one of them. Exhaust work, just not as good as jake or some of the new types.

Also and original installed option is usually less expensive than a rework, but not always.




Pete :dizzy:

Alan
10-16-2002, 07:42 PM
I brought this back to the top, hoping to get an answer to my question about gearing. Not trying to be argumentive but I just can't see where it's such a bad thing.

Originally posted by Alan
What is so terrible about 5+2 gearing? I grew up driving stuff set up that way and never thought it was too bad to live with. Tht setup gives you both a good creeper reverse for backing in around a jobsite and still gives you a decent reverse speed for when you need to back a long distance. Particularly in plowing operations that fast reverse is handy. Only real drawback I see is that the 5 speed is only a single countershaft design and won't handle the torque loads that the currently available engines can generate. There were lots of 5-7 yard dumps with that gearing and tehy seemed to do the job pretty darn good.

Gravel Rat
10-16-2002, 09:08 PM
What are you trying to get a answer from me if so I will tell you a 5+2 is no good around here in the hills when you got 35,000 lb truck and your climbing a 10% grade and gotta try shift the two speed axle well forget it. A single speed rear axle is alot stronger less hassels your constantly fighting the electric motor on those two speed rears epecially during the rainy season. The selector in the rear axles are constantly going it doesn't take much and bam you have blown the selector.

In my mind if your stuck with buying a truck on juice brakes then you will have to buy a truck with a 5+2 but nobody in their right mind would wanna buy a 5 ton truck with juice brakes.

With a Road ranger transmission you got better speed controll alot more durable it and reliable its pretty hard to beat a 8LL in a single axle dump.

The highways dept here used to run old International single axle plow trucks they were on juice brakes and 5+2s the maintanance company got tired of fixing 2 speeds so they got rid of the trucks .

They replaced all the trucks with Western Star single axles with M-11 Cummins power 35,000 gvw and 9spd Road rangers since they bought these trucks its saved them alot of money. The trucks are easier to drive the drivers like them they plow the snow faster they carry more weight. The company has never had any driveline problems they don't have to replace 2 speeds every month no more. When we were doing ditch cleaning the Gradall operator was putting close to 8 yards of ditch muck into the Stars they handled the load just fine. The drivers could pull hills with no problems the old Internationals couldn't even dream of packing that weight.

All I have driven is trucks with road rangers and probably never drive a 2 speed axle truck why drive one when you can drive a superior transmission (Road Ranger)

Its just my opinion I want a heavier duty truck I don't want to deal with small drive train.

hosejockey2002
10-16-2002, 10:48 PM
Hey Gravel Rat, I know you said you were going to stick with your f450 but if you change your mind, down the road in Bellingham there is a 1984 Ford 9000 single axle 5-6 yard dump. The ad says low mileage, 240hp Cummins, 7 speed Spicer trans, $8500 US. Looked like a decent truck for the $$. Phone # is 360-676-5948.

Gravel Rat
10-17-2002, 12:18 AM
That is a good deal but to buy anything south of the boarder will cost me a extra 50% because our dollar value sucks so bad :( so I would have to pay 12,750 plus tax so I'am looking at a total 13,642 dollars. Then the CND gov't slaps some duty on top of that which pumps the price up even higher I don't know what the duty rate is off hand.

Oh well I'am still searching for a 450 but I'am having troubles I guess people are not buying new trucks so the used truck market is slow.