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allendehl
11-13-2010, 12:53 PM
Hi guys,

I planted my lawn myself about 5 months ago and it was doing fairly ok. As expected some weed started to grow all over the lawn and I headed to my local Home Depot to ask for advice.
They told me to use Bayer Advanced Southern Weed Killer for lawns.(pic attached)

I applied it once and consumed only a very small portion of the spray bottle, it regulated the content pretty well. Bad luck that is started to rain a couple of hours later.

After a few days, I noticed that the weeds were still there, so I decided to apply the killer again(thought that probably the rain washed it out before). This time I expected the bottle to regulate the product as good as it did it before and started to water my garden the same way.. When I took a look at the bottle, it had consumed almost half of it and I wasn't even in the first half of the lawn. I then hurried up and walked really quick to finish up the whole thing.
It looks like for some reason the regulator the bottle has inside broke and mixed too much product.

Results, after a few weeks my lawn now looks like these pics. The bottle said clearly that It Wont Harm Laws, but.... did I kill my lawn?
Is there a way I can save it?

I thought going back to HD and buy some fertilizers but I better get good advice here first.

Thanks in advance!

FYI: I leave in S.Florida and the grass is Palmetto.

Ric
11-13-2010, 01:55 PM
Allen

I call it the way I see it and never pull a punch.

I see it two ways. You can do a lot of studying and buy a lot of equipment. But that doesn't ensure you will have a nice lawn. Or you can Hire a professional who will give you the results you are looking for.

As for the hose end sprayer::

Professional injectors cost hundreds of dollar and don't always work correctly. You are using a Plastic Throw away injector and asking why it burned your lawn. That is a rhetorical question BTW.

Tim Smith
11-13-2010, 02:35 PM
Find a good sod guy. Even if it's not completely dead winter recovery will be to slow.
Posted via Mobile Device

Will P.C.
11-13-2010, 03:52 PM
It really isn't all that bad. I was expecting worse. The recovery might be slow, but it will recover. Unfortunately, you should take my opinion with a grain of salt since I know nothing about Palmetto grass.

This season, I got lazy and decided to buy something similar to that, but used the Ortho brand out of the same type of sprayer. I had some weeds coming in the back of my property. I have access to many chemicals, but didn't feel like converting and measuring, so I bought the Ortho. This product pretty much 'scorched' an entire strip in the back of my property. It took almost all season to recover.

fl-landscapes
11-13-2010, 04:11 PM
rics advice is good advice, get someone who knows how to care for your lawn. I think your biggest mistake was doing a second application only two days after the first, I think your lawn is fried!

RigglePLC
11-13-2010, 05:15 PM
Professional equipment costs more--and it does a better job. Free advice at HD...? I am from Michigan...is Palmetto a type of St Augustine?
Maybe you used more water pressure the second time. Did you say you sprayed your garden? Ric is right. An experienced applicator would have given you better results, used a better product, and better equipment. Live and learn. It will probably recover after a few months of warm weather.

sweetjetskier
11-13-2010, 06:20 PM
Biggest mistake that you and many,many people have/ continue to make is taking advice from big box store employees to heart.

I am sure a handful have a knowledge base, but 98 percent have not a clue, lawn, plumbing,electrical, hardware, paint,etc.

Find a locally owned lawn care provider, can be the best place to start your search.

My 2 cents
Posted via Mobile Device

Tim Smith
11-13-2010, 06:36 PM
If it's palmetto being stressed in the winter months will finish it off.
Posted via Mobile Device

grassman177
11-13-2010, 07:41 PM
hire a pro, it is alot more than just randomly spraying on a lawn, correct application to get results requires calibration to get a certain measured amount of the active ingredient over a certain broadcast area. it is all detailed on a label, but i am sure that bottle has clear instructions(yeah right, how could it) as to how much.

it is most likely dead, and wont be able to be reseeded well for a few weeks at least, depending on the amount of over toxicity has built up from the complete misapplication of a chemical.

fl-landscapes
11-13-2010, 10:42 PM
hire a pro, it is alot more than just randomly spraying on a lawn, correct application to get results requires calibration to get a certain measured amount of the active ingredient over a certain broadcast area. it is all detailed on a label, but i am sure that bottle has clear instructions(yeah right, how could it) as to how much.

it is most likely dead, and wont be able to be reseeded well for a few weeks at least, depending on the amount of over toxicity has built up from the complete misapplication of a chemical.

thats for sure, st augustine seeds are too small to harvest, there for unavailabe. Sod or plugs only.

Fireguy97
11-14-2010, 12:23 AM
Biggest mistake that you and many,many people have/ continue to make is taking advice from big box store employees to heart.

Exactly!

A couple of weeks ago I had to pick up a part at HD on a Sunday for an emeergency repair for a client. When I was picking up the part out of the bin, I overheard someone asked an orange apron for advice on a product. They came over, took the product from him, and read the label out loud. - That was the extent of their "advice". I told him the best way to use it and told him to use another product (also sold at HD) for a better result. Orange apron started to argue with me about application situations and results, when he clearly had never used either product, or any similar products (which he admitted) - after reading only one label.

If you get free *advice* from a box store, you get what you pay for.

Mick

Florida Gardener
11-14-2010, 12:48 AM
My question is why did you install palmetto in a full-sun area?

Landscape Poet
11-14-2010, 01:14 AM
My question is why did you install palmetto in a full-sun area?

Diamond - just because palmetto is considered shade tolerant - does not mean it must be in the shade. Even shade tolerant should be used within reason - it is still recommended that it has 6 hours of light to be heatlhy, so more sun is not going to harm it.

Landscape Poet
11-14-2010, 01:19 AM
To the OP -

You thought you had weeds before - wait until that fried St. Augustine declines more. My suggestion is call in this order

1. Lawn Company to replace the damaged areas
2. As Ric and others have said - a licensed company that handles lawn fert and pest control - but be warned all of them are not created equal and sometime there is such a thing as " a high price of paying to little" with them. Ask around for references as often you will get what you pay for!

RAlmaroad
11-14-2010, 05:16 AM
The damage is done. If you can still get St. Augustine sod, spend the time and put down half pieces (plugs) that have plenty of stolons and water it two times a week. Over the winter it will begin to fill in the other places. If you are OK with the cost--hire it re-sodded. Give it some starter fertilizer with a higher uptake of potassium and a little phosphate for the root system. Remember to keep it wet for 10 days while it is merging with the soil. No traffic would help. St. Augustine does not go truly dormant and will grow a little during the cooler months. From your photographs you didn't kill the whole yard. Stuff happen in life. Learn from it and move on. If nothing ever went wrong--nothing would ever be relearned. "There's nothing new under the sun"
I once used some Image on winter weeds along a road with centipede--Talk about a lesson relearned. Didn't hurt any homeowner but wiped out about 50' of public ditch. For those who don't know Image--It can only be used on full growing southern turf.
See, it's nothing that a little time and money can't fix.
Cheer up and re-sod--this too shall pass.

allendehl
11-14-2010, 09:24 AM
Guys,

Thanks lot for your advices. The problem here with hiring a professional at this point to re-sod the whole thing is cost. We bought the house a few months ago and for now we have to recover from the punch.
Before sodding I asked a person that does my neighbor garden about it and the price was way too high, plus I liked taking care of my lawn myself. In the other hand, I have to admit that my neighbor's lawn looks 10X nicer than mine. Can anyone of you give an idea of the average cost of planting 2 pallets of sods, so I can compare and decide? Each pallet costs around $100 in a nursery.

RAImaroad, thanks for your words, those pics are from the front(the part that took less pesticide). The back is almost 90% fried. I just noticed it has some "red-ish" grass leaves growing in different areas though, is this a good sign?.
I put down the sods myself initially bit it didn't have any grass on, it was easy. Now, how do I do this with with all the dead lawn?


Thanks again.

fl-landscapes
11-14-2010, 09:41 AM
Guys,

Thanks lot for your advices. The problem here with hiring a professional at this point to re-sod the whole thing is cost. We bought the house a few months ago and for now we have to recover from the punch.
Before sodding I asked a person that does my neighbor garden about it and the price was way too high, plus I liked taking care of my lawn myself. In the other hand, I have to admit that my neighbor's lawn looks 10X nicer than mine. Can anyone of you give an idea of the average cost of planting 2 pallets of sods, so I can compare and decide? Each pallet costs around $100 in a nursery.

RAImaroad, thanks for your words, those pics are from the front(the part that took less pesticide). The back is almost 90% fried. I just noticed it has some "red-ish" grass leaves growing in different areas though, is this a good sign?.
I put down the sods myself initially bit it didn't have any grass on, it was easy. Now, how do I do this with with all the dead lawn?


Thanks again.

if you wanted to do it yourself you could rent a sod cutter for half day $45 and lay two pallets sod yourself $190ish. Total under $250. Small job like that you may pay close to $1 a square foot for a small job like that if you hire someone.

RAlmaroad
11-14-2010, 09:48 AM
Well, you're going to have to dig up the old stuff so that the new sod will it level with any existing grass. Use a roto-tiller that you can rent or if you have a maddock or any other heavy wide blade hoe type of tool to cut the sod. I have a very old railroad aze. Sod cutters are great but unless you've used them, they can be a pain. A wheel barrow and cutting out and taking up the place where you are going to sod is slower. I'd only do one pallet at a time as it will be a little slow.
Remove just enough to let the sod make good contact. Put down a little starter fertilizer and place you sod. Two pallets of St. Augustine will cover about 1000sq. ft. But it grow together very quickly. You could plug it with half pieces. Think of a checker-board and just place the half-pieces of sod on all black or red squares. Don't cut it any smaller that roughly 1'X 1' as there are not enough stolons there to spread well. Within two growing seasons it will be completely covered. Ever visited a sod-farm. They cut out long strips with about a 4-6" strip of St. Augustine left between the harvested grass. The grass will be grown back the end of the next growing season. We have sod-farm all in SC and I visit and have made friends with them. A good key to growing it in quickly is plenty of potassium and phosphate. A healthy amount of Nitrogen every month will help as well as an abundance of water. Water, water, water. All of my lawns in SC get water every other day at 3/4-1.0". I know a lot more than what a lot of folks think. One client waters hers every other day for three hours/day. Her lawn is magnificent. Now these are on sandy with hardly no sub-soil and water goes through sand like a holes in the bottom of a bucket. Each soil is different and has got to be watered accordingly. 1" of water may work for a water retaining soil as clay, but sand--Ha...
I'd plug it, fertilize it with a good liquid fertilize that will feed both the roots and the leaves and water like crazy again and watch her grow. Be prepared to buy a new set of blades for the tractor as the stuff will wear out a set/year....Just kidding but it won't grow without food and water. Sorta like people.

Ric
11-14-2010, 11:04 AM
Allen

Given the time of year and your pocket book may I suggest.


Over Seed with Rye Grass for the winter and plan on plugging your yard in the spring just at the start of rainy season. However a month before plugging have a professional do a Total weed kill on your yard. Have a professional treat your yard once a month the first summer to get a good grow in.

When Plugging or planting anything except palm trees, use Milorganite in the hole right against the roots. Grass plugs are the one thing you want to plant deep. Growth Regulators like Primo will actually increase the speed of your grow in by cause excessive lateral growth. Of Course Water and Fertilizer are key.

Landscape Poet
11-14-2010, 02:09 PM
Guys,

Thanks lot for your advices. The problem here with hiring a professional at this point to re-sod the whole thing is cost. We bought the house a few months ago and for now we have to recover from the punch.
Before sodding I asked a person that does my neighbor garden about it and the price was way too high, plus I liked taking care of my lawn myself. In the other hand, I have to admit that my neighbor's lawn looks 10X nicer than mine. Can anyone of you give an idea of the average cost of planting 2 pallets of sods, so I can compare and decide? Each pallet costs around $100 in a nursery.

RAImaroad, thanks for your words, those pics are from the front(the part that took less pesticide). The back is almost 90% fried. I just noticed it has some "red-ish" grass leaves growing in different areas though, is this a good sign?.
I put down the sods myself initially bit it didn't have any grass on, it was easy. Now, how do I do this with with all the dead lawn?


Thanks again.


Rics suggestion is a good one depending on the pricing of plugs in your area - here they are a little on the high side to start with, especially considering cost associated with plugging like higher herbicide cost, because mother nature is going to fill in all the voids where there is not grass.

As FL said - a sod cutter is a effective way to remove you sod (old grass) and you should be able to find one for rent at lowes or home depot. They are fairly simple to operate, however they are very heavy. A couple of things to consider if you are planning on doing your sod yourself is do you have the ability to get a sod cutter to your home, meaning do you own a truck or a small trailer? Also you must figure out how will remove the old sod from your property - once you cut it , it must be disposed of, and I doubt that the city services will pick this up for you, which means you must either pay to have it hauled away or transport it do your local landfill, both of which have a cost associated with them.

I would suggest looking at the cost of each of these options and you may find that the price given to you by the neighbors landscape guy was very reasonable.

For example let say you want to do the sod yourself.

Cost of sod cutter for 4 hrs - $45 - for the day $99 including insurance in case somthing gets broken on it.
Now do you have a truck and trailer? Figure the cost of you renting a truck for sod cutter pick up as well as a trailer rental for the pallets of sod.
Cost for a pallet of sod - If you go with Palmetto again - you are looking at a higher cost than lets say Floratam. Cost for 500 square ft of Palmetto Pallet - $159 - Floratam would cost you maybe $105.
Just in case you are not getting it yourself with a trailer - I would say it would be safe to add $25 delivery charge for each pallet from the sod company.
But then again you have to still dispose of the waste - so there is more money.
I just thought I would throw that out there for your information because sometimes it seems like doing it yourself would be cheaper - but once you are into the project you start to see that it was not. Hope this is helpful in helping you out.